[PDF] Augustus International University. Catalog - Free Download PDF (2024)

Download Augustus International University. Catalog...

Augustus International University

Catalog

2015–2016

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

2

Contents MISSION STATEMENT ............................................................................................................................................ 3 MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN AND FOUNDER ........................................................................................................... 4 ABOUT AUGUSTUS INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY .................................................................................................. 6 VISION ................................................................................................................................................................... 7 GOALS.................................................................................................................................................................... 8 SOCIAL CHANGE & ECOLOGICAL AWARENESS ........................................................................................................ 9 LEARNING AT AUGUSTUS INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY ...................................................................................... 10 HOW COURSES ARE DELIVERED ........................................................................................................................... 11 FACULTY .............................................................................................................................................................. 12 COURSE REGISTRATION, COSTS, & TUITION ......................................................................................................... 13 AIU ACADEMIC & STUDENT POLICIES ................................................................................................................... 14 STUDENT LIFE & THE ONLINE ENVIRONMENT ...................................................................................................... 22 EMAIL CONTACT INFORMATION .......................................................................................................................... 23 FLORENCE COLLEGE UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS............................................................................... 24 FCLAS CORE CURRICULUM & CREDIT REQUIREMENTS ......................................................................................... 27 FCLAS PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................................................................... 30 FLCAS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ............................................................................................................................. 32 OCEAN SEMINARY COLLEGE ................................................................................................................................. 54 OSC: DEPARTMENTS & PROGRAM OVERVIEWS ................................................................................................... 57 OSC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS AT A GLANCE .................................................................................................... 61 OSC COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ................................................................................................................................ 73

Augustus International University 2015–2016 Catalog © 2015 by Dr. Katherine Batten. All Rights Reserved. For Inquiries please contact AIU at [emailprotected]

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

3

Mission Statement

With a core value of ensuring all individuals have a fundamental right for education regardless of where they live, how much they earn, or their capacity to physically attend a traditional university, Augustus International University has the threefold mission of  Providing barrier-free, comprehensive undergraduate programs in a range of popular and globally impactful majors through the Florence College of Liberal Arts and Sciences;  Supporting the building of global reconciliation, diversity, and compassion initiatives within inclusive, religiously diverse graduate studies through Ocean Seminary College;  Creating socially, ecologically, and technologically aware students capable of providing leadership in the 21st century. Augustus International University (AIU) is dedicated to creating the highest standards in education within the unique landscape of online learning, focused on fostering self-directed and cooperative learning, promoting community-centered research, and encouraging academic publishing at all levels of study.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

4

Message from the Dean and Founder

For most students, local colleges and famous universities have always been there—and for many “there” is a distant dream that is financially out of reach or simply not an option at all as education is just not part of one’s cultural experience. As a young woman, I never thought I would not go to college. It was expected of me and my parents and I went through the coming-of-age process of Middleclass, White, suburban American youth: pad your application with extracurricular activities (often requiring a great deal of parental funding), volunteer often or at least enough to make you distinct, hire tutors to ensure a high score on the SATs, and then diligently craft your personal essay that demonstrates you are definitely unique and are socially aware. Then have your parents commit to the financial responsibility of anywhere between $35,000 to upwards of and over $100,000 for your bachelor’s degree. Once all these eggs are in the basket, you can sign and date your application, tucking it in the envelope with the non-refundable filing fee. When I was 17, I never thought twice about this process—I merely shopped reputations of schools like I was going to the local mall for the latest fashion trend. And I moved through my undergraduate years with the same blissful and generally ignorant privilege that led to my initial application and also characterized my early adulthood. I would learn the hard way that my privileged youth went only so far when confronted with a disabling disease and the subsequent poverty that would follow. Education became an out-of-reach process even within the online landscape due to the requirements of “face-to-face” residencies. Unlike many, I was, however, still fortunate enough that I had already obtained most of the graduate education I wanted before becoming ill. It was during the height of my illness and anger at even the inaccessibility of online institutions that I started Ocean Seminary College—precisely because access to education was out of reach for most and I had become painfully aware of the barriers and wanted to change them. As my interactions with students increased over the years, I was repeatedly hearing how they were unable to achieve undergraduate degrees due to cost or disability or other barriers. My social life was starting to fill with friends who never had access to money for undergraduate programs and so their work options remained more limited and their own desire for education denied. The impact of denying individuals access to education reaches beyond the personal level. It is not simply about what individuals are denied, but also what is absent from the broader landscape of society through the lack of research these individuals are capable of performing and contributing to our societies. These exclusions dramatically impact what we know about the world. Academics spend their lifetimes producing information about how the world works, which play roles in determining public policy, understanding illnesses and psychological constructs, identifying fundamental principles in science, and expanding our artistic, cultural, and business frameworks. Academics sit at the core of our industrialized societies, yet when this excludes thousands and thousands of individuals we risk narrowing our understanding of human society and the world. We risk narrowing our vision to reflect the cultural experiences of those privileged enough to have access to learning. This in turn creates what might be best described as a stroke: by denying others, we deny the rich flow of blood to the brain that is the collective consciousness of human beings and it paralyzes aspects of our world and prevents new pathways of invention, skill, imagination, and knowledge. It is with the drive to ensure that all individuals have access to education that AIU has emerged. Through its two arms: Florence College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Ocean Seminary College (please

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

5

see the OSC catalog for programs within this school), AIU hopes to support scholars from all walks of life to obtain the human right to education. Katie Dr. Katherine Batten Dean of Augustus International University D.Th, PhD, MA, M.Ed, Sum, OCP, RPDP

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

6

About Augustus International University Augustus International University and Florence College of Liberal Arts and Science (FCLAS) were founded in 2015. As an outgrowth of Ocean Seminary College (founded in 2005), AIU and FCLAS were designed to maintain the mission of barrier-free education and extend the benefits of this education to students outside the field of religion. Within the guiding framework of Ocean Seminary College (OSC), AIU and FCLAS are focused towards empowering students to meet the challenges of a rapidly changing world and to be active researchers and sociopolitical participants in the identifying and developing beneficial strategies to address issues of globalization, political instability, financial-market changes, social inequities, and environmental risks. AIU meets these challenges through its two colleges. Florence College of Liberal Arts and Sciences meets these challenges in three specific ways. 1. Through core curriculum, which grounds students in all major areas of thought to ensure they are able to actively participate in their communities and countries. 2. Through publishing opportunities to communicate their ideas and discoveries. 3. Through a global student body that allows students to develop meaningful relationships as well as gain a global perspective on major areas of thought. Ocean Seminary College meets these challenges in two specific ways: 1. It is the only seminary in the US that provides a fully diverse program of study, where all faiths are represented and encouraged. Students may elect to focus on their religion of calling or to explore other faiths—yet all students are required to engage in shared dialogue and to grow in appreciation for the multiplicity of the Divine. OSC does not foster exclusionary beliefs that only one path reflects ultimate truth, but rather fosters not only tolerance but joyfulness in exploring the many revelations of the Divine. 2. In addition to creating an active spiritual and scholarly climate of diversity, OSC is also grounded upon the notion that Nature is central to any spirituality that seeks to reveal and embody the presence of the Divine. As such, all students are required to participate in coursework that grounds them in: (a) the latest scientific theories emerging in ecology, (b) ecologically minded ethics and theological frameworks revealing the Divine within Nature, and (c) self-exploration to identify how their own unique spiritual paths can facilitate ecologically responsible behavior.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

7

Vision Augustus International University has one vision: to provide equitable access to quality education regardless of ability to pay or attend. They share the view that education should be a human right rather than limited to only a few and should be global in nature. It revolves around the values of interconnectedness, which students are experience through immersion, exploration, self-reflection, nurturing, generating, openness and reception, communication, and transformation.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

8

Goals Augustus International University nine critical goals: 1. To provide students with an opportunity to learn within and connect to a global environment; 2. To encourage students to immerse themselves in their area of interest through a range of course options. 3. To provide students with a rich learning environment that enables them to make discoveries about the world around them. 4. To encourage students to develop breadth and depth of understanding of a rich array of material. 5. To foster students in developing a compassionate and responsible attitude towards others in their community as well as the natural world. 6. To encourage students to be active participants in generating future research. 7. To enable students to maintain a healthy, balanced lifestyle where students can readily pursue activities in their day-to-day lives with their loved ones without having to worry about school deadlines and academic pressure. 8. To provide students with opportunities to publish and express their ideas and positions. 9. To encourage students to explore new ideas and perspectives through the ability to take courses in all majors.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

9

Social Change & Ecological Awareness A critical element of Augustus International University and its associated colleges is the importance of empowering students to be active participants in creating an ecologically aware society and the promotion of human rights. Students are expected to recognize global incidences of human injustice and to gain specific strategies to work at changing these events within their own communities. Students are required to work towards understanding how each class may be a resource towards positive social change and the establishment of human rights. Students are also required to gain an understanding of and exhibit this understanding through action of the current state of the planet and other species.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

10

Learning at Augustus International University

Augustus International University is designed to support adult learners. Most of our students are attending college for the first time as adults. As such, we pride ourselves on creating a flexible educational environment that allows learners to maintain all of their personal and work responsibilities while working towards education. All courses are online and self-paced. With an understanding of the range of financial challenges individuals face, courses utilize a wide range of free learning material or textbooks that are relatively low-cost or easily obtained used. We encourage students out-of-the-box thinking and to express their own views, rather than regurgitate. Students are encouraged to critique the work they read and to value their perspectives, while engaging in dynamic discussions with others. Students regularly participate in what types of courses they would like to see offered and how. We’ve added whole new majors based on student demand; we also readily adjust textbooks based on student ideas. Additionally, for students with psychological or physical challenges, we work with that student to adjust their program and accessibility needs to ensure they are able to participate in the broader dialogue that they are often excluded from in traditional university settings.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

11

How Courses Are Delivered

Augustus International University offers wide range of dynamic virtual learning. Our course structures are as follows: Independent Study, whereby students are in charge of their learning goals and work with their faculty advisor on a research project throughout a semester or a year. Self-Paced Study. To ensure that students do not become only “students” at the expense of the rest of their beingness, courses are all self-paced where students may complete work at a pace that fits their life-needs. Online Course Delivery. Courses are offered at both Florence College and Ocean Seminary College and through two external open-access education sites: Saylor Academy (Courses offered here are abbreviated with SA; www.Saylor.org) and Alison (AL, www.Alison.com). Email-based courses. Some of the courses that require ongoing dialogue between students and teachers over set schedules. Live Seminars. To encourage students to interact with each other and allow opportunities to talk in depth with their professor some courses are delivered live at specific times online. These are generally scheduled to meet all student’s needs. Students taking courses at Saylor or Alison provide AIU with their final transcripts of the course, which includes final exam testing or testing throughout the course. Additionally, students will be randomly assigned writing projects within the Alison and Saylor courses to ensure they are learning the material rather than taking for the test. All results are compiled for a final grade from their program.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

12

Faculty Augustus University International, Florence College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Ocean Seminary College always welcome individuals who have specific backgrounds in the associated field they are volunteering to teach in. All positions are unpaid and voluntary. All individuals must have a Master’s degree or higher to teach at Florence College and a doctoral degree or be a doctoral candidate to teach at Ocean Seminary College (an exception is made for the department of World Shamanism and the department of Neopagan Studies, for these department relevant work experience is required. For further information and an application, please contact: [emailprotected]

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

13

Course Registration, Costs, & Tuition There are two types of cost at AIU: fall/winter tuition and spring/summer tuition; this is $50.00 billed at the start of each semester (September and March). Additionally some courses require students to purchase textbooks. Textbook requirements are noted in the course bulletin distributed at the start of each semester. Every effort is made to ensure textbooks are affordable. Students who are unable to afford textbooks for a course should contact Dr. Batten for alternatives and assistance. Registration for courses require approval of Dr. Katherine Batten to ensure that the course you are registering for would be appropriate for your degree and level of study; this includes courses registered at Saylor and Alison. As such, all students are required to email course registration choices to Dr. Batten and the registrar at [emailprotected] according at the start of each semester. A course bulletin noting which courses are open for the semester is distributed at the start of each term. OSC and FCLAS courses are not offered all the time, students must take courses noted in the bulletin. Saylor and Alison courses are open year round. Students will be required to set up an account with these online sites in order to take courses.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

14

AIU Academic & Student Policies 1 Homework Policies 1.a. All students are responsible for ensuring their homework is complete and submitted appropriately following course instructions; including on time and with appropriate attention to writing requirements. Students failing to demonstrate adequate depth of thought and clear writing style risk failing the course. 1.b. No homework may be submitted prior to deadlines unless noted in the course or permission given by instructor. In Self-Study programs, students are required to take 1 week for each lesson. 1.c. Students in any program may ask questions about their lessons or reading assignments at any time, either to the appropriate online course forum or privately to Dr. Batten at [emailprotected]. 1.d. Students may not move on to the next lesson or course until all required homework is submitted in full. No exceptions. 1.e. Students registered in semester courses are expected to participate in discussion boards with all assigned homework complete (discussions/responses) to maintain active status and receive credit. Students who fail to complete ALL weeks in a semester may face the following responses: (a) an extension for course completion; (b) an opportunity to retake the course at a later time; (c) academic probation including limits on future course registrations; (d) dismissal from AIU/FCLAS/OSC. 1.f. Students who fail to submit homework within the first week of semester-based online courses will be withdrawn from class and dismissed from OSC unless the student contacts AIU/FCLAS/OSC within the following week. 1.g. Students who fail to submit homework on time per course deadlines without permission from the instructor will be withdrawn from the course and placed on academic probation or formally dismissed from AIU/FCLAS/OSC. 1.h. Students who fail to post 2 weeks in a row during a semester with no contact to AIU/FCLAS/OSC, will be placed on Academic Probation. Students will be formally dismissed from AIU/FCLAS/OSC within a month if no contact occurs. 1.i. Students in Self-Study courses are required to complete at least half their self-study course within 90days of registering for this course unless they contact Dr. Batten for extensions or leave-of-absence. Failure to work on any registered course during this time and no contact will result in dismissal from AIU/FCLAS/OSC. 1.j. Newly admitted students to any of OSC initiatory programs must submit their second component on time. Failure to do so will result in dismissal from the training program. No contact will result in dismissal from OSC following a month of Academic Probation. 1.k. All homework is to be of original composition and not be copied from another source unless that

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

15

source is appropriately cited with the author, text/web site address, and page number. Students who fail to cite references or quote excessively will have homework points reduced. Persistent posts in this manner after feedback this will result in failure of the course and Academic Probation. 1.l. Family members taking courses together are required to submit their own homework with their own unique ideas. Persisting patterns of posting in this fashion will result in failure of the course. 1.m. Students in semester-based or 6-week intensive courses are expected to post primary discussions that reflect their own reading of the assigned texts. Posts that do not indicate reading will not receive credit and two weeks of this type of work will result in dismissal from the course and Academic Probation. 2 Community and Course Board Interactions 2.a. This is a nondiscriminatory program embracing all individuals, regardless of sexual orientation, religious background, ethnicity and race, gender, economic class status, health status, and other social identities. Students must communicate in a respectful and open manner when posting. Students expressing covert or overt forms of discrimination will be promptly terminated from this program. There are no exceptions to this policy. 2.b. Students are not permitted to advertise on any board without having first submitted information, including the post they plan on placing on the board, to K. Batten for approval. 2.c. Students are free to express their views but are reminded to avoid utilizing inflammatory, stigmatizing or discriminatory statements against groups of individuals, political entities, etc. Please preface personal opinions of this nature utilizing "I-statements" to reduce friction or prevent students with opposite views from feeling comfortable on the boards. 2.d. Students are required to maintain confidentiality of other members to ensure a climate of trust and a forum of healthy development and relationship building. 2.e. Students may volunteer to develop and run adjunct discussion boards. Students wishing to do this are required to submit a formal idea to Dr. Batten. Student-run boards will be terminated if the student fails to participate according to AIU/FCLAS/OSC guidelines in their primary courses. Students in good academic standing may retain adjunct boards. 2.f. Board access will be terminated under the following conditions: (1) termination of training or course participation either initiated by student or by AIU/FCLAS/OSC; (2) inactivity within any registered course; (3) failure to participate in a course you are registered for during the first week OR for 2 or more weeks during the semester; (4) inappropriate content or interactions with other community members on or off the community site; (5) failure to follow seminar or course cancellation guidelines; (6) failure to follow AIU/FCLAS/OSC policies. 3 General Academic Policies 3.a. Students are required to complete all components of their registered program of study in order to be permitted to move on to the next degree.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

16

3.b. Degrees are conferred only when students have met the academic and experiential requirements of their program of study. 3.c. Students needing accommodations for experiential activities due to disability should contact Dr. Batten as soon as possible to develop a comparable substitution. 3.d. Students need accommodations for course work due to learning disabilities and ADHD, Depression, Bipolar Disorder or Anxiety-based disorders should contact Dr. Batten as soon as possible to explore accessibility and learning issues. 3.e. Courses and programs with required texts are the sole responsibility of the student to obtain. Courses will not be able to be completed without an edition of the required text. Substitutions may be possible in the event students cannot locate a copy of the required texts and should be requested immediately upon registering. Every effort will be made to ensure texts are available through Amazon.com and are affordable. 3.f. Currently enrolled students may register for any course or seminar that is presently available. 3.g. Non-initiatory training courses are based on a 4-point academic system, with 4.0 reflecting an A and 0.0 reflecting an F. Experiential courses are graded on a pass/fail basis. Seminars are graded on a present/absence basis. Students are expected to demonstrate depth of thinking, integration of knowledge, application and personal experience. Students failing to make sufficient progress in their studies will transition through a period of 3-months of academic probation and support; if no progress is made during this time, students will be discontinued from studies. All students seeking a degree or ordination from AIU/FCLAS/OSC are required to maintain a B-average (3.0) in all required courses and to complete every course in full (including completion of all weeks required and submission of any project or paper). 3.h. Formal academic transcripts are available to students who request them and will be mailed and signed by K. Batten to the requesting student and/or academic institution. 3.i. Students are expected to display their credentials in a manner consistent with their State's laws. 3.j. AIU/FCLAS/OSC, its faculty, and Dr. Batten are not liable for any student engaging in a manner inconsistent with state or federal laws. 3.k. Students are not permitted to formally study and share training material with non-registered students due to copyright restrictions and the integrity of the degrees at AIU/FCLAS/OSC. 3.l. Adult family members and couples may simultaneously study together. However, preference is given to the first registered student and their level of comfort with their family member and/or partner sharing the community environment with the student. If the first student expresses discomfort, the prospective student will be denied admissions or withdrawn from the program. 3.m. All couples studying together are responsible for submitting their own work. 3.n. Students facing a medical crisis or life challenge are encouraged to contact Dr. Batten to request a

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

17

Medical Leave of Absence (MLA) or a Family Leave of Absence (FLA) to retain their student status. There are no time limits for MLA/LAs; however students must remain in contact with Dr. Batten once per each semester. Failure to remain in contact will result in dismissal. 3.o. Academic Probation (AP) is implemented under the following circ*mstances: (1) a student has participated consistently well but then stop participating; (2) a student has a medical crisis (physical/psychological) during a semester, but expresses a strong desire to complete work; (3) a student demonstrates less-than-expected academic participation, but a sincere desire to learn. 3.p. Actions determined for Academic Probation vary between students based on their needs and underlying reason for AP. The following actions may be taken: (1) Prevention from registering for following courses in a series if the prior course was not completed until that course is retaken; (2) Suspension from registering for a semester to allow time for the student to reconsider their commitment levels or stabilize their health; (3) Requirement to take a remedial academic class in writing; (4) Suspension from student-run adjunct board. 3.q. Masters and Doctoral degrees can only be legally conferred to students who have earned an undergraduate degree. Students who do not hold an undergraduate degree will receive a comparable professional degree; however they cannot utilize the title “Doctor” or place "M.Div" after their names. Students doing so violate state and federal laws and risk jeopardizing the integrity of this institution. 3.r. Students without an undergraduate degree who are complete a thesis in their Masters program or a dissertation in their doctoral work will receive an honorary degree. Students are required by law to display this degree as follows: M.Div (h.c.), D.Min (h.c.). This indicates a degree awarded as honoris causa.

4 Discontinuation of Enrollment 4.a. Students are welcome to terminate their enrollment and should email Dr. Batten of their intentions. 4.b. Students do not need to provide any explanation of why they are terminating studies, unless they so choose. 4.c. Studies may be discontinued at any time by Dr. Batten or AIU/FCLAS/OSC under the following circ*mstances: (a) inappropriate conduct on boards; (b) failure to commit to training, consistently incomplete online courses, or failure to cancel workshop/seminar attendance; (c) misrepresentation; (d) unlawful use of material and intellectual property; (e) false claims and the establishment of business ventures in a in the name of AIU/FCLAS/OSC; and (f) if further training or study is not in the best interest of the student's psychological, spiritual, and/or physical safety. 4.d. Family members or couples formally studying may be discontinued from AIU/FCLAS/OSC if one or both exhibit relational instability that disrupts the community or each other's learning process. At which time, Dr. Batten may also suggest family therapy or couple's counseling to help stabilize the family

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

18

process and reestablish healthy boundaries. 4.e. AIU/FCLAS/OSC and Dr. Batten may cease operations at any time and are under no obligation to provide continued studies should events emerge that prevent the continued operation of the AIU/FCLAS/OSC. Any closures will occur between semesters and prior to billing. 5 Scope of Practice: Teaching (related to OSC) 5.a. Students interested in teaching an OSC initiatory tradition or ordination must demonstrate the successful completion of a 4-year apprenticeship through all levels of study. 5.b. Only following completion of the above noted goals may a student be able to teach independent in these traditions. This ensures that the public is appropriately protected as the new teacher will have the appropriate shamanic skills to guide students, ensuring their psychological and psychic safety, and to have established an extensive base of experience to address a wide range of spiritual, ethical, and social circ*mstances that may arise. 5.c. Teachers of an OSC initiatory traditions are ethically bound not to charge students in forums of groups, workshops, or other meeting places or for shamanic training material and teaching designated as public domain by Dr. Batten. This does not include fees charged for healing and specific skills unique to the teacher acting as a 'Healer' that are deployed on the behalf of the individual. In these circ*mstances, the individual is considered healing rather than teaching and does not require the individual to learn any specific technique. 5.d. Teachers of the initiatory traditions may distribute material with permission of Dr. Batten, pending the meeting of training requirements. 5.e. Students receiving a M.Div or a D.Min may seek academic and vocational placements with these degrees pending full disclosure on their resume of where degrees were earned and non-fraudulent activities. Ocean Seminary College and Dr. Batten are not liable for fraudulent practices.

6 Scope of Practice: Healing (related to OSC) 6.a. Individuals who complete a M.Div in the initiatory pillar traditions may act and advertise as Healers. 6.b. In this role, individuals may seek a nominal fee for healing services. Healers are encouraged to make shamanic healing financially accessible to their community members. 6.c. Healers are not permitted to facilitate workshops where healing techniques are taught; this is considered "Teaching". 6.d. AIU/FCLAS/OSC and Dr. Batten are not responsible for any actions taken by an individual when working as a healer and individuals are strongly encouraged to know the limitations and scope of the law in the state in which they practice. Students are reminded they cannot diagnose as per federal and state laws without a medical license.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

19

6.e. Healing practices include, but are not limited to: energy/chakra work, herbal healing, crystal healing, soul retrieval, divination, and other types of healing students will learn in the course of their training. 6.f. AIU/FCLAS/OSC and Dr. Batten are not liable for any professional practice undertaken by any student with a degree. 6.g. AIU/FCLAS/OSC will not provide education on medical herbalism. Medical Herbalism requires a medical license to practice and is illegal to teach in the United States. 7 Copyright 7.a. All written material and images remains the property of Dr. Batten under International and US Copyright law. 7.b. Students/practitioners are not permitted to earn any income from any written material, image, or idea regarding the initiatory pillar tradition without express written permission from Dr. Batten and completion of at least level 3 or 4 training. 7.c. All course material, catalogues, and website information are copyright and the sole property of Dr. Batten and AIU/FCLAS/OSC. 7.d. Course reading material remains under ownership of the author and publisher. Students are not permitted to distribute ANY course material electronically or in print to a non-student of AIU/FCLAS/OSC or post to a web site. To do so jeopardizes AIU/FCLAS/OSC 's capacity to continue to offer courses at no cost for texts. Students caught distributing material will be immediately dismissed. Students are also liable for any copyright infringements for such distributions. 8 Seminar/Class Cancellation Policy 8.a. Students are required to cancel prior to scheduled start time through: (1) responding to confirmation emails with the subject line Cancellation; or (2) emailing Dr. Batten at [emailprotected] 8.b. Students who miss more than 2 online discussions and do not cancel may be barred from all services offered at the seminary and will be de-registered. 8.c. Students who are unable to cancel due to medical or family emergencies and illnesses or technical challenges will not be discontinued, providing they inform Dr. Batten as early as possible. 8.d. Students who fail to participate in online course that requires weekly participation for 2 weeks and who either (a) do not cancel participation or (b) contact Dr. Batten will be withdrawn from AIU/FCLAS/OSC and may not be permitted to reapply; students will additionally not be given a refund. 8.e. Students are required to inform Dr. Batten of any absence from work extending beyond 2 weeks or student status will be deactivated and students will be deregistered from AIU/FCLAS/OSC. 9 Gossip & External Socialization Policy

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

20

9.a. While it is human nature to gossip, please recognize that gossip can lead to misinformation that significantly jeopardizes the psychological safety of students. If you have concerns about the training process or the community, please email Dr. Batten directly at [emailprotected]. 9.b. It is likely that each of you may form external relationships with other students, pleases recognize that the seminary is not responsible for the quality of these relationships, nor can the seminary guarantee that you will find these external relationships healthy or satisfying. Please use your discretion when providing personal information about yourself or information such as your phone number or address. 9.c. All students are informed equally of all policies, learning, goals, and other material related to the operations of AIU/FCLAS/OSC. The seminary follows a policy of full and equal disclosure. 9.d. The only external social networking site affiliated with AIU/FCLAS/OSC is its associated Facebook pages and Twitter accounts. 10 Separation of Academic, Psychology, & Clergy Policies 10.a. Dr. Batten is an ordained minister and the seminary training is solely related to seminary education (academic support) and pastoral care of students involved. Pastoral care involves providing support and guidance on personal issues from the spiritual perspectives of this tradition through (1) email feedback; (2) group and community site feedback; (3) feedback through homework; and (4) live feedback associated with class discussions. 10.b. While Dr. Batten holds a doctoral degree in Health Psychology /Psychoneuroimmunology and a Master’s degree in Counseling Psychology, legal and ethical guidelines prohibit Dr. Batten from acting as a therapist when she is acting as a teacher as this is considered a Dual Role. Students experiencing psychological distress requiring formal counseling interventions are encouraged to seek a licensed counselor in their home state. Dr. Batten will assist a student locating necessary services within their state. 11 Technology, Contact, Privacy Policies 11.a. Students are responsible for maintaining a valid email address as this is the primary method of providing AIU/FCLAS/OSC communication. 11.b. Students are required to inform Dr. Batten of any email change to prevent disruption in studies. Failure to do so will result in dismissal from AIU/FCLAS/OSC after three months. 11.c. Students whose email accounts "fail" to receive for a two-week period with no student contact will be de-registered from the community site and courses, with re-registration activated upon the submission of a valid email and contact with Dr. Batten. 11.d. Students who hold a Comcast, Bellsouth, or Verizon email address may wish to establish a free of times the email provider blocks receipt due to mislabeling it as SPAM or please add the following two email addresses to your email account: [emailprotected] 11.e. Personal information will never be disclosed to any third-party individual or other student to the

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

21

best of the seminary's ability; the seminary cannot guarantee the safety of technology. Upon dismissal of a student, records are held for 1 year and then shredded. Academic records are only retained if a student attended AIU/FCLAS/OSC for at least a year and/or completed 1 course to ensure students may request academic transcript at any time. 11.f. To protect contact privacy all group emails are sent as BCC, which hides individual user accounts. 11.g. Students who send or post attachments are responsible for ensuring that no attachment sent to the seminary has a virus. Recommended programs include Norton Antivirus or McAfee Virus Protection. 11.h. AIU/FCLAS/OSC has two anti-virus programs running at all times and attachments are all screened prior to email. 11.i. Students are responsible for their own computers, software, and internet needs. 11.j. Students are not permitted to adjust their group membership on their profiles, change their email, or user name on the course board. To do so will result in inadvertent cancellation of your account and course board access. If students wish to change these profiles, they need to contact Dr. Batten at [emailprotected] 11.n. AIU/FCLAS/OSC's course board has a high security feature that prohibits guests and spammers and is secured on its server; however AIU/FCLAS/OSC cannot guarantee that hijacking and spamming may not occur despite of these features. 12 Tuition 12.a. Students are required to pay $50.00 by September 15th and March 15th of each year to retain student status. 12.b. Students who are unable to pay tuition due to financial hardship may request a lesser cost or tuition-free status. Students requesting this are receiving federal, state, or county assistance and/or are un- or under-employed, or are experiencing other social factors that have placed them at or below the US federal poverty line for individuals, couples or families. Exceptions may be made for students who are on the cusp of these limits. 12c. Students living outside of regions that utilize paypal may submit their tuition via Western Union. Students should contact Dr. Batten about this at [emailprotected]. 12.d. Students recognize that some courses taught by other professors at AIU/FCLAS/OSC may require an additional course fee. Students are required to pay that professor directly or request course-fee reduction or tuition-free status. 12.e Students those who currently live in a country that does not participate in trade with the United States, Paypal or Western Union are exempt from tuition requirements.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

22

Student Life & the Online Environment Augustus International University, Florence College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Ocean Seminary College are a fully integrated online university where students participate in specific course discussion boards and live classroom interaction held at our college chat site. Such interaction is also an integral aspect of self-study at AIU/FCLAS/OSC, whereby students can interact with other students in self-study paths and courses to retain a sense of community and connection. In addition to a fully integrated online learning environment, students have access to a wide range of support services to foster academic growth and build a sense of community. Upon acceptance, students are provided with a school email account and access to the AIU/FCLAS/OSC Student Center. This is the social hub of the university where students can connect with each other and also participate in external student-run groups and activities. Students may also join the AIU/FCLAS/OSC Facebook page or follow AIU/FCLAS/OSC on Twitter. Students also have access to the seminary bookstore, campus store for gear such as sweatshirts and other gifts, library resources, and writing center. Transcripts and course progress information remains updated regularly in a student’s personal records forum. Admitted students are also encouraged to schedule 1:1 time with. Dr. Batten to discuss their goals, course issues, and any personal challenges that emerge during the course of their studies by requesting individual advising time. All academic and personal advising time occurs via phone or skype. Dr. Batten is also readily available via email at any time students need to contact her.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

23

Email Contact Information Dr. Batten is reachable at [emailprotected] Admissions is reachable at [emailprotected] OSC Admissions is reachable at [emailprotected] Faculty Inquiries: [emailprotected] To register for courses, please utilize: [emailprotected]. Please remember to write out the full name of the course.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

24

Florence College Undergraduate Degree Programs

Florence College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers 13 majors and also encourages students to consider double majors and to take a range of courses outside their major to support overall learning:

Art History (B.A.) The undergraduate program in Art History seeks to provide students with necessary skills to examine, understand, and interpret all forms of visual arts as it emerges through all cultures and artistic mediums, whether from religious art to postmodern expression. Students are grounded in artistic styles as they have emerged and changed throughout history and how various forms of artistic expression have been used as means to communicate diverse aspects of the artist’s social milieu. Biology (B.S) The undergraduate program in Biology seeks to ground students in core concepts of life sciences with an emphasis on critical thinking, reasoning, and the capacity to apply the scientific method. Students within the Biology program will also gain foundational knowledge in other areas of science and demonstrate understanding of how biology fits among other sciences. Students will also examine the social implications of biological discoveries and information and how this is utilized within the broader social dialogue.

Business (B.S.) Concentrations: General Business, Administration, Communication, Project Management, Finance & Economics, Information Technology The undergraduate program in Business allows students to develop critical skills to succeed in the workplace, whether it is within their own business or within a company. Students are grounded in the basic principles of business within a global landscape and may opt to concentrate on specific areas as they relate to their professional goals or their current work environments.

Chemistry (B.S.) The undergraduate program in Chemistry allows students to gain foundational and general knowledge of chemistry. It is designed as a preparatory program for students who wish to move forward in their career goals, such as graduate school or to be able to work in the professional industry. It is not an ACS accredited program.

Criminal Justice (B.S) The Criminal Justice program is a pre-professional training program for students in the United States that grounds students in the theory and practice of the social control. Students gain an understanding of the impact of social contexts, beliefs, and attitudes coupled with political structures, and the emergence of law as a means of enforcing these variables. Students also gain an understanding of criminal justice from a global perspective and will be able to articulate the ethical issues that face individuals within the criminal

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

25

justice field. Students are also required to research the specific legal structures of their individual social context (local, state, and federal landscapes).

General Studies (BA) The General Studies program is designed for students to create their own major. Students work with Dr. Katherine Batten to ensure there is a comprehensive focus and to review the pros and cons of creating a non-traditional Bachelor’s degree. Students will review their career goals to ensure the degree will help them further their career. Students are required to still meet all the core curriculum. Students with diverse interest and work goals should consider duel majors.

History (B.A.) The History program blends both structured and independent study to enable students to directly study the history of their nation and it historical relationship to the world around them. With a firm foundation of their personal historical contexts, students expand their understanding to the global perspective. Students critically examine the ways in which history shapes present ideologies and contributes to major changes in human societies, from pre-history to present-day society. Students are grounded in major global events and develop an in-depth understanding of how these have led to major shifts in the broader experience of human beings and their construction of culture.

Literature (B.A) The Literature program may be engaged in two specific tracks: students may work on a broad platform of learning with exposures to a range of literature and styles from around the world OR they may create their own program that examines the literary work of their specific cultural heritage. In this fashion, a generalist major may read French literary giants such as Victor Hugo and modern Canadian author Margaret Atwood; while a culture-specific student might read only French writers. Students who are planning on working within a specific culture, must have their study goals approved by administration.

Mathematics (B.S) The program in Mathematics provides students with the technical skills to engage with major theories and concepts in mathematics. Further students may also elect to expand their conceptual and technical knowledge to examine the social impact of mathematics and its relationship to general society.

Mechanical Engineering & Physics (B.S) The Mechanical Engineering and Physics program provides students with professional technical skills to participate in the field of Mechanical Engineering or pursue graduate work within the field or adjunct fields such as Aerospace. Students gain a firm foundation in mathematics, general sciences, and specific coursework in mechanical engineering. Students gain practical knowledge through the creation of final projects that emerge from within the landscape of mechanical engineering. At the conclusion of their studies they are able to demonstrate the necessary techniques associated with the field.

Philosophy (B.A)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

26

Students who study the Philosophy program take a combination of undergraduate and graduate-level courses (through Ocean Seminary College). Students may additionally examine specific philosophical traditions of their specific country. All students are grounded in the general field of study of Philosophy and its related field of Ethics.

Political Science (B.S) A degree in Political Science provides students with grounded understanding in the central concerns of political science: power structures (formal and informal political institutions/organizations), political behavior as an extension of sociology and psychology, political processes, global economies, and the relationship between the individual and society. Due to the cross-disciplinary nature of the field of study with sociology and psychology, students are encouraged to take a range of courses within these fields. Additionally due to differences between societies, students are encouraged to create an independent course that examines political science concerns as it relates to their own nation and national identity.

Psychology (B.S) The Psychology program provides students with comprehensive preparation in psychology for those who are interested in pursuing related fields either at the entry level work environment or graduate-level education and clinical practice. Students are introduced to the central concerns of the field as well as critical theories and theorists. Additionally students are introduced to statistical analysis and the process of designing and interpreting social science studies.

Religion (B.A) The Religion program is designed to function as a precursor to entrance into Ocean Seminary College. Students are asked to take a broad level of introductory courses within the field of religion and to examine central concerns within the field, including core theological structures and interactions between religions and society, as well as specific concerns with science and religion and politics and religion. Courses taken at OSC during this program may transfer undergraduate credit to OSC should they pursue graduate education there.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

27

FCLAS Core Curriculum & Credit Requirements

Learning at FCLAS involves more than courses within a major, students are also required to become wellgrounded scholars in a range of subject areas. This is known as the Core Curriculum. Students take 14 courses (42-credit hours) above and beyond the 12 courses (36-credit hours) required for their major for a total of 78 credit hours. Core Curriculum topics are required for all students and ensure students are well-grounded. Courses that meet core curriculum components are noted under each learning domain. (Abbreviations: SA = Saylor Academy; FCLAS = Florence College of Liberal Arts and Science) International Landscape (6 credits; 2 courses from the noted list)  Analyze the degree to which forms of human difference shape a person's experiences of and perspectives on the world.  Analyze a contemporary global issue from a multidisciplinary perspective.  Analyze the relationship that science and technology have to a contemporary social issue.  Analyze issues of social justice across local and global contexts. SA Political Science 221: Introduction to Comparative Politics SA Political Science 211: Introduction to International Relations SA Environmental Studies 203: Environmental Ethics, Justice, and Worldviews Natural Sciences (6 credits; 2 courses)  Understand and apply basic principles and concepts in the physical or biological sciences.  Explain and be able to assess the relationship among assumptions, method, evidence, arguments, and theory in scientific analysis.  Identify and critically assess ethical and societal issues in science. SA Introduction to Molecular and Cell Biology 101 AND SA Introduction to Evolutionary Biology and Ecology 102 Social Sciences (3 Credits, 1 course)  Understand different theories about human culture, social identity, economic entities, political systems, and other forms of social organization.  Apply concepts about human and social behavior to particular questions or situations. SA Psychology 101: Introduction to Psychology OR

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

28

SA Sociology 101: Introduction to Sociology History (3 Credits, 1 course)  Explain the development of some aspect of a society or culture over time, including the history of ideas or history of science. Employ historical reasoning to study human endeavors. SA History 103: World History in Early Modern and Modern Eras (1600 to Present) OR FCLAS History 101: Introduction to World History Arts and Humanities (6 Credits, 2 courses)  Examine critically philosophical and other theoretical issues concerning the nature of reality, human experience, knowledge, value, and/or cultural production.  Analyze arts and/or literatures in themselves and in relation to specific histories, values, languages, cultures, and technologies.  Understand the nature of human languages and their speakers.  Engage critically in the process of creative expression. SA Art 101: Art Appreciation and Techniques SA Literature 101: Introduction to Cultural and Literary Studies SA Philosophy 101: Introduction to Philosophy SA Music 101: Introduction to Music Writing and Communication (6 credits, 2 courses)  Communicate complex ideas effectively, in standard written English, to a general audience.  Respond effectively to editorial feedback from peers, instructors, and/or supervisors through successive drafts and revision.  Communicate effectively in modes appropriate to a discipline or area of inquiry.  Evaluate and critically assess sources and use the conventions of attribution and citation correctly. Analyze and synthesize information and ideas from multiple sources to generate new insights. SA English Composition 001 SA English Composition 002 Mathematics, Information Technology, and Formal Reasoning (6 Credits, 2 courses)  Formulate, evaluate, and communicate conclusions and inferences from quantitative information.  Apply effective and efficient mathematical or other formal processes to reason and to solve problems. SA Mathematics 101: Beginning Algebra SA Computer Science 101: Introduction to Computer Science 1 SA Mathematics 121: Introduction to Statistics SA Science and Technology 101: Introduction to Science, Technology & Society FCLAS Mathematics 400 Literature in Math

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

29

FCLAS Biology 400 Literature in Biology Social Change and Responsibility (6 Credits, 2 courses)  Understand how societies work toward excluding individuals based on spurious characteristics, such as gender, sexual identity, economic status, ethnicity, ablebodiness, language, and race, etc.  Identify strategies to ameliorate such structures.  Gain understanding of the interrelationship between human beings and the environment/nonhuman world FCLAS Sociology 400: Structural Violence and Social Change (required) AND SA Environmental Studies 203: Environmental Ethics, Justice and Worldviews OR SA Environmental Studies 504: Society, Economy, and the Environment

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

30

FCLAS Program Requirements

All majors require a minimum of 12 classes or 36 credit hours in addition to completion of the Core Curriculum courses in order to be awarded a Bachelor’s degree. Major-specific required courses are noted below. Please see the FCLAS Course Description section of this catalog to learn more about each course noted. Art History SA ARTH 101, SA ARTH 110, SA ARTH 111 Biology SA BIO 101B, SA BIO 110L, SA BIO 102, SA BIO 102L, SA CHEM 101 Business Sub-concentrations—Administration, Communication, Project Management, Finance & Economics, Information Technology/Computer Science SA BUS 101 (required for all sub-concentrations); see courses available at Saylor listed under the following: SA BUS, SA COM, SA CS, SA CUST, SA ECON, SA MSTR Criminal Justice FCLAS CJ 001, FCLAS CJ 002, FCLAS CJ 003, FCLAS CJ 004, CLAS CJ 005, FCLAS CJ 006-007, FCLAS CJ 008 Chemistry SA CHEM 101, SA CHEM 102, SA CHEM 103, SA PHYS 101, SA PHYS 102, SA MA 101, SA MA 102 Computer Science Computer science courses are listed within the Business Program descriptions. To opt for a Bachelor’s in Computer Science rather than Business, please speak with Dr. Batten regarding your program requirements. General Studies Please contact Dr. Batten regarding this program to discuss what courses are necessary. History SA GEOG 101, SA HIST 101, SA HIST 104

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

Literature SA ENGL 101 Mathematics SA MA 001, SA MA 002, SA MA 003, SA MA 004, SA MA 005 Mechanical Engineering SA ME 101, SA ME 102, SA PHYS 101, SA PHYS 102 Philosophy (FCLAS Philosophy courses are offered through OSC, see OSC section of this catalog) SA PHIL 101, SA PHIL 102 Political Science SA POLSC 101 Psychology SA PSYCH 101 Religion (All religion courses are offered through OSC, see OSC section of this catalog) OSC 03.01.001

31

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

32

FLCAS Course Descriptions

Florence College of Liberal Arts and Science courses abbreviated as FCLAS Please see: www.Saylor.org for full course descriptions; abbreviated SA Please see www.Alison.com for full course descriptions, abbreviated A Please see Ocean Seminary College section for course descriptions for classes in Religion and Philosphy. Art History FCLAS courses in Art History FCLAS Art History 400 Self Study This course is self-designed by the student with permission of Dr. Katherine Batten. FCLAS Art History 401 Museum Explorations This course requires students to visit local museums within their community and write about their experiences and the art they explored. FCLAS Art History 402 The Artist This course changes during various semesters and takes an in-depth look at specific artists. Saylor courses in Art History SA ARTH101: Art Appreciation and Techniques This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history, and in-depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative thought and processes. In this course, you will learn how to develop a five-step system for understanding visual art in all forms. SA ARTH110: Introduction to Western Art History: Pre-historic to High Gothic In this course, we will study the history of Western art, beginning with the first objects created by prehistoric humans around 20,000 years ago and ending with the art and architecture of the High Gothic period in fourteenth-century Europe. SA ARTH111: Introduction to Western Art History: Proto-Renaissance to Contemporary Art In this course, we will study important movements and some influential artists in Western art history, beginning with the “Proto-Renaissance” in Italy in the thirteenth century and continue through to the late 20th century. SA ARTH201: Art of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East This course serves as an introduction to the major artistic and architectural traditions of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East. SA ARTH202: Art of Ancient Greece and Rome This course examines the stages of development in classical art in Ancient Greece and Rome from 900 BCE to the rise and growing influence of Christianity on the artistic ideas and work. SA ARTH206: The Italian Proto-Renaissance to Mannerisms This course focuses on identifying the influence of the Renaissance upon the arts of Italy. SA ARTH207: Baroque Art to Neoclassicism This course explores Western art as it developed from the 1600s to the late 1800s. SA ARTH208: Modern Art This course examines various artistic movements that emerged in the 19th and 20th centuries. Saylor ARTH209: 20th Century Art This course focuses on an in-depth examination on 20th century art within the United States and Western Europe and the emergences of unique innovations of artistic mediums. SA ARTH210: American Art This course explores American art from the colonial era through the post-war 20th century.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

33

SA ARTH301: Art Historical Methodologies This course introduces the student to major methodologies that are used by art historians. SA ARTH303: Art of the Islamic World This course introduces pre-modern Islamic artistic traditions of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Central and South Asia. SA ARTH304: African Art This course examines the art and architecture of the African Continent from the prehistoric to the present. SA ARTH305: Arts of Asia This course serves as an introduction to the major pre-Modern artistic traditions of India, China, and Japan. SA ARTH307: Arts of Latin America This course is a chronological and thematic survey of the major themes and developments in the history of Latin American art. SA ARTH401: Early Christian and Byzantine Art This course critically examines the history of Eastern Christian art and the emergence of Christianity in the Late Antique period and the formation of the Christian visual language that grew out of the Classical tradition. SA ARTH406: Buddhist Art This course examines the development of Buddhist artistic traditions in Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, China, Korea, and Japan. SA ARTH408: Contemporary Art This course examines the artistic period of the 1960s to current movements. SA ARTH409: Roman Architecture This course examines Ancient Roman architecture emerging in the 8th century BCE and through the 4th century CE.

Biology FCLAS courses in Biology FCLAS Biology 400 Literature in Biology This course explores the writing of biological material. How a range of writers from Darwin to Stephen Jay Gould have struggled to express biological research and concepts to the general public. FCLAS Biology 401 Biogeography I This course introduces students to the study of the impact of geography on the life sciences. FCLAS Biology 402 Biogeography II This course takes the study of biogeography to the landscape of islands. FLCAS Biology 403 Invertebrate Zoology This course introduces the student to the study of invertebrate zoology FCLAS Biology 404 Critical Thinkers This course looks at critical contributors to the science of biology and varies from semester to semester. FCLAS Biology 405 Self Study This course is self-designed by the student with permission of Dr. Katherine Batten. Saylor courses in Biology SA BIO101A/B: Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology This course is intended for the student interested in understanding and appreciating common biological topics in the study of the smallest unit within biology: molecules and cells. Students may choose either course section. SA BIO101L: Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology Lab To be taken in conjunction with BIO 101A/B, this course allows students to work within a virtual lab to help learn to apply concepts from the class. SA BIO102: Introduction to Evolutionary Biology and Ecology This course introduces students to the study of evolutionary biology and its interrelated science of ecology. Students are encouraged to take SA BIO 102L, the corresponding lab for no credit to help reinforce the course material.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

34

SA BIO301: Cell Biology This course looks in-depth at the structure of the cell and each of its components functions. SA BIO 101A/B is required prior to enrolling in this. SA BIO303: Neurobiology This course looks at the field of neuroscience with attention to how the brain interacts with the body through a network of billions of nerves and other cells to facilitate everyday functioning. A recommended course for students in majoring in Psychology. SA BIO305: Genetics This course will examine the process of inheritance and the structure and function of chromosomes, DNA, and genes. SA BIO306: Botany This course examines the world of plants and the science of studying them. SA BIO307: Microbiology This course introduces the student to the field of microbiology, specifically examining the study of microscopic-sized organisms. SA BIO308: Marine Biology In this course, students gain an in-depth understanding of ocean life; its plant and animal diversity and its unique ecological landscapes. SA BIO309: Zoology This course looks at the broad classification of multicellular organisms and classification of species. SA BIO310: Developmental Biology This course examines how organisms emerge and differentiate. SA BIO311: Molecular Biology This course provides a more in-depth course on cellular structures responsible for the expression and synthesis of genes, specifically nucleic acids, DNA and RNA. SA BIO312: Evolutionary Biology This course extends learning from SA BIO 102 and digs more deeply into various theories of evolution. SA BIO313: Population Ecology This course focuses on the relationship between the species and their ecosystem and how members of the species are impacted by the environment in shaping their population size. SA BIO401: Biochemistry This course examines the chemical processes and compounds that define the makeup of the cell. Students are recommended to have taken SA CHEM 101. SA BIO402: Pathobiology This course introduces the student to the study of human disease at the cellular and tissue level. SA BIO403: Biotechnology This course examines the relationship between the fields of biology and engineering and other fields of science. SA BIO404: Cancer Biology This course examines the processes responsible at the cellular level that regulate normal and abnormal cell growth, with a focused discussion on the development of various types of cancers. SA BIO406: Microscopic Anatomy This course is a deeper discussion of the components of the cell. SA BIO407: Immunology This course introduces the student to the complexity of the immune system and how it functions to aid the organism. The course also examines what happens when the immune system functions poorly. Alison Courses Some of these courses are identical subjects offered with Saylor, students may choose which class they prefer. A 101 Diploma in Human Anatomy and Physiology This course introduces students to a comprehensive understanding of the human body and how various systems function to ensure optimum health.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

A 102 Biology—Cell Division This course explores in-depth the process of cell division that occurs in all organisms. A 103 Biology—Genes and Gene Technology This course explores the technology expansion in our understanding of DNA since its discovery. A 104 Biology—Heredity This course explores in-depth the process of inheritance. A 105 Biology—Fundamentals of Cellular Respiration This course examines in-depth the process of respiration and its function for obtaining energy from nutrients and waste removal. A 106 Biology—Fundamentals of Virology This course examines in-depth the process of infectious particles as they replicate inside a cell. A 107 Biology—Introduction to Cellular Physiology This course introduces the student to the science of cellular physiology that looks at the structure and function of individual cells. A 108 Biology—Immunology This course examines the function and physiology of the immune system.

Business & Computer Science FCLAS courses in Business FCLAS Business 400 Self Study This course is self-designed by the student with permission of Dr. Katherine Batten.

Saylor courses in Business Sub-Category Business Administration SA BUS101: Introduction to Business This course introduces students to the general concepts and key terms in the field of business. SA BUS103: Introduction to Financial Accounting This course introduces students to the language of financial accounting and how to compile and analyze financial data. SA BUS105: Managerial Accounting Prerequisite SA BUS 103. Students are introduced to the process of interpreting and presenting financial data in a department-specific way to communicate critical ideas necessary for specific managers or departments versus the company at large. SA BUS202: Principles of Finance Prerequisite SA BUS 103. In this course, students learn how financial data is utilized by managers, stakeholders, and regulators. SA BUS203: Principles of Marketing This course introduces the student to the core principles of marketing and marketing decisions organizations must make to sell a product or service. SA BUS204: Business Statistics This course provides students an introduction to statistical methods and analysis as it pertains to the business field. SA BUS205: Business Law and Ethics Students are introduced to the law and ethical standards managers must abide by when engaging in business activities. SA BUS206: Management Information Systems This course introduces students to the formal discipline of Management Information Systems (MIS) that examines the relationship between technology and business fields of finances, marketing, and management. SA BUS208: Principles of Management This course explores in depth the role of the manager and how the manager shapes and is shaped by the company. SA BUS209: Organizational Behavior

35

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

36

This course introduces students to the field of organizational psychology with specific focus on understanding how individuals act upon an organization and how an organization acts upon the individual. SA BUS210: Corporate Communication This course provides students with critical information on the role of effective communication within the corporate environment. SA BUS300: Operation Management This course focuses on grounding students in the fundamental principles of operations management. SA BUS301: Human Resource Management Prerequisite: SA 208 Principles of Management. This course examines critical functions of a human resource director and more specifically about the process of accessing human resources to ensure a company reaches its maximum potential. SA BUS303: Strategic Information Technology Prerequisite: SA 206 Management Information Systems. This course extends the information from its perquisite to examine how information technology may be utilized as part of an organization’s overall strategy and business plan. SA BUS305: Small Business Management This course looks at basic functions for establishing a business, including business planning. BUS 306: Advertising and Promotion This course focuses on grounding students in the fundamentals of advertising principles and the role advertising plays in the promotional mix. SA BUS401: Management Leadership This course provides students with an in-depth understanding what defines leadership and strategies of effective decision making within the business environment. SA BUS402: Project Management This course will examine the process of project management, including understanding expectations, planning, budgeting, reporting, and maintaining quality and control. SA BUS403: Negotiations and Conflict Management This course grounds students in the conceptual framework of negotiations and its application in public and private sectors. SA BUS404: Risk Management This course will provide students with understanding of core principles of risk management. SA BUS501: Strategic Management This course should be the last course taken. This course integrates information several concepts in business and looks at how individuals develop and implement goals within their fields of business. Sub-Category Communications SA COMM001: Principles of Human Communication This course introduces students to the main principles, theories, and practices of the field of communications. SA COMM002: Media and Society This course grounds students in the theories that are utilized to examine the impact of media at the individual and group levels, including government. SA COMM101: Public Speaking This course examines the elements and factors that create effective speech. SA COMM103: Introduction to Mass Media This course examines the evolution and impact of media within the United States and the evolution of media over time. SA COMM311: Intercultural Communication Taken towards the end of a communications concentration, this course focuses on the context in which media occurs and is interpreted through diverse cultural lenses. SA COMM411: Public Relations Prerequisite COMM 101.In this course students are prepared to engage in public relations in various business contexts. Sub-Category Computer Science SA CS101: Introduction to Computer Science I This course provides an introduction to the field of computer science and the fundamentals of programing. SA CS102: Introduction to Computer Science II

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

37

Prerequisite SA CS 101. This course extends the topics of the prior course and focuses on more complex programing languages. SA CS107: C++ Programming This course introduces students to the popular programming language and provides students with a foundation in how to utilize the langue including writing basic data structures and functions. SA CS201: Elementary Data Structures Prerequisite SA CS 107. This course provides students with a deeper understanding of data structures and how to create them. SA CS202: Discrete Structures This course introduces students to discrete mathematics (students should have mathematics experience through calculus). SA CS301: Computer Architecture This course examines the interaction between hardware and software. SA CS302: Software Engineering This course examines software engineering as a body of knowledge and is designed to present concepts and principles in parallel with the software development cycle. SA CS303: Algorithms Students are introduced to basic algorithm strategies and approaches to problem solving. SA CS304: Compilers This course focuses on introducing the process of compiling for the software developer. SA CS305: Web Development This course looks at the basic fundamentals of the Internet and Web protocols and the programing languages that enable Web development. SA CS401: Operating Systems This course examines modern operating systems with a focus on UNIX-based systems, as well as Windows. SA CS402: Computer Communications and Networks This course examines what computer networks are and the protocols that they utilize. SA CS403: Introduction to Modern Database Systems This course examines modern database systems such as Structured Query Language. SA CS404: Programming Languages Prerequisite all computer science courses in the 100s. This course examines the design of program languages, such as Object-Oriented, Functional, Scripting, and Logical. SA CS405: Artificial Intelligence Students are introduced to the field of artificial intelligence, including programming, logic, gaming, learning, language, and robotics. SA CS406: Information Security This course examines the fundamentals of information security utilized to protect information stored and information travelling over computer networks. SA CS407: Network Applications Development This course examines the applications that provide the interface between the user and the Internet. SA CS408: Advanced Artificial Intelligence Prerequisite SA CS 405. This course examines the concept of the software agent and the problems the field of AI encounters. SA CS409: Cryptography This course examines the science of writing code that requires a high level of security. SA CS410: Advanced Databases Prerequisite SA CS 403. This course extends the discussion on SQL and introduces advanced topics such as query optimization, concurrency, data warehouses, object-oriented extensions of XML. SA CS412: Mobile Applications Development Prerequisite SA CS 305. This course looks at two specific issues: program design for web interface with mobile devices and program design specific for mobile devices. Sub-Category Economics

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

38

SA ECON101: Principles of Microeconomics This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of microeconomics. SA ECON102: Principles of Macroeconomics This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of macroeconomics. SA ECON200: Math for Economists Prerequisite: students should have demonstrated competency calculus. This class introduces students to specific mathematical techniques that are necessary for economists. SA ECON201: Intermediate Microeconomics Prerequisite: SA ECON 101. This course extends upon concepts examined in ECON 101, examining frameworks that enable an economist to understand economic phenomena. SA ECON202: Intermediate Macroeconomics Prerequisite SA ECON 102. This course provides students with a richer understanding of concepts such as output, unemployment, inflation, consumption and investment to better understand the dynamics of the economy. SA ECON301: History of Economic Ideas This course provides students with an introduction of the history of economics and economic thought. SA ECON302: Money, Banking, and Financial Markets This course introduces students to a basic understanding of the roles money, banking, and financial markets play in the economy. SA ECON303: Labor Economics This course specifically examines the role wages play in the economy. SA ECON304: Economic Development This course introduces students to major theories of economic development. SA ECON305: Public Finance This course examines how public economics and public choice intersect to address issues of social optimality. SA ECON306: Industrial Organization This course surveys specific topics and theories in the field of Industrial Organization as it is applied to microeconomic structure. SA ECON307: International Trade This courses provides students with frameworks for understanding and analyzing trends in international trade. Alison courses in Business Some of these courses are identical subjects offered with Saylor, students may choose which class they prefer. A 101 Diploma in Accounting: Core Practices and Theories This course examines core practices involved in ensure financial records are maintained appropriately. A 102 Diploma in Accounting: Advanced Controls and Transactions An extension of A 102, this course explores in greater depth the process of managing accounts, documentation, and requirements for sales-based transactions. A 103 Diploma in Business and Legal Studies This course examines key issues related to law within the corporate environment. A 104 Diploma in Business Management and Entrepreneurship This course provides an in-depth overview of key management issues, including: corporate, operations, accounting, human resources, and project management. It additionally examines critical skills for entrepreneurs. A 105 Diploma in Business Process Management This course introduces students to the elements of management and information systems. A 106 Diploma in Customer Service This course examines the fundamental elements of customer service and their critical application to the business environment. A 107 Diploma in E-Business This course looks at the role that online businesses are playing within the global business environment.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

39

A 108 Diploma in Human Resources This course provides an in-depth exploration of what human resources is and its central functions and concerns within the business environment. A 109 Diploma in Manufacturing and Product Design This course introduces students to the role of manufacturing and product design in business. Students learn how concepts are brought into fruition and ultimately mass produced. A 110 Diploma in Operations Management This course examines the role of operations management within diverse business environments. A 111 Diploma in Project Management This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the process of product management. A 112 Diploma in Social Media Marketing This course examines the role of social media as a means of increasing consumer awareness revenue A 113 Fundraising for the Non-Profit This course introduces students to the process of fundraising within the non-profit sector.

Chemistry FCLAS courses in Chemistry FCLAS Chemistry 400 Self Study This course is self-designed by the student with permission of Dr. Katherine Batten. FCLAS Chemistry 401 Critical Thinkers & Discoveries This course looks at critical contributors to the science of chemistry and varies from semester to semester. Saylor courses in Chemistry SA CHEM101: General Chemistry I This course introduces students to the principles and history of the field of chemistry. SA CHEM102: General Chemistry II Prerequisite SA CHEM 101. This course expands upon the first course and specific examines the tools needed to understanding chemistry at a deeper level. SA CHEM103: Organic Chemistry I Prerequisite SA CHEM 102. This course introduces students to the basic concepts of the three-dimensional structure of an organic molecule and how atoms bind within a carbon-based molecular structure. SA CHEM104: Organic Chemistry II Prerequisite SA CHEM 103. This course examines in greater depth the chemical reactions associated with organic/biological molecules. SA CHEM105: Physical Chemistry I (FCLAS final project assigned) Prerequisite SA CHEM 102. This course introduces students to thermodynamics. SA CHEM106: Physical Chemistry II Prerequisite SA CHEM 105. This course examines the principles of quantum mechanics and the interaction between matter and electromagnetic waves. SA CHEM107: Inorganic Chemistry Prerequisite SA CHEM 102. This course specifically examines metals and their components and reactivity. SA CHEM108: Analytical Chemistry Prerequisite SA CHEM 102. This course introduces students to the process of measurement and the composition of chemical samples. SA CHEM201: Advanced Organic Chemistry Prerequisite SA CHEM 104. This course builds upon concepts in Organic Chemist I and II. SA CHEM201: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Prerequisite SA CHEM 107. This course will look at various chemical properties and the practical applications these may have for various industries.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

40

SA CHEM204: Bioorganic Chemistry Do not take SA CHEM 203 as it will not count towards your major. This course examines the chemistry behind biological/physiological processes. SA CHEM205: Spectroscopy This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the theory the various spectroscopic techniques. Alison Courses Some of these courses are identical subjects offered with Saylor, students may choose which class they prefer. A 101 Chemistry—States of Matter This course examines in-depth the four states of matter: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma—and what factors lead to changes between states. A 102 Chemistry—The Nature of Substances This course examines what factors lead to molecular changes.

Criminal Justice FCLAS courses in Criminal Justice FCLAS Criminal Justice 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice Societal responses to people and organizations that violate criminal codes; police, courts, juries, prosecutors, defense and correctional agencies, and the standards and methods used to respond to crime and criminal offenders; social forces that affect the evolution of criminal laws. FCLAS Criminal Justice 102 Police The function of police in contemporary society; the problems arising between citizens and police from the enforcement and non-enforcement of laws, from social changes, and from individual and group police attitudes and practices. FCLAS Criminal Justice 103 Prison in Society: Perspectives on Incarceration & Punishment Origins and methods of revenge, coercive custody, confinement, punishment, rehabilitation, restitution, deterrence, and prisoner education programs examined. Includes emphasis on current controversies related to jail and prison overcrowding, treatment of violent juveniles and chemically dependent offenders, and AIDS risk assessment of juvenile and adult offenders. FCLAS Criminal Justice 104 Public Policy & Law Introduces students to the process by which criminal law and criminal justice policies are crafted and implemented in the American political process. Because of the nature of U.S. federalism, crime policy is a multi-layered process with distinctive features at each level. Students will learn basic concepts about public policy-making across local, state, and national governments and will focus on specific areas of criminal punishment in order to more fully understand the complex nature of the policy process as well as the unique challenge of developing effective crime control policies. FCLAS Criminal Justice 105 Procedures Description and discussion of what is commonly characterized as the "criminal justice process and public policy consideration" through which substantive criminal laws are enforced. FCLAS Criminal Justice 106-107 Forensics I & II Contributions of physical science to crime prevention, detection, and prosecution; significant forensic aspects of chemistry, biology, geology, and physics as applied to prevention planning, contraband control, preserving evidence, ballistics, optics, sound, and sampling natural materials. FCLAS Criminal Justice 108 Research Methods in Criminal Justice Underlying research concepts, methodologies, and techniques appropriate for application in the main behavioral environments of justice; application of course content to justice agencies, policies, and programs. FCLAS Criminal Justice 109 Laws in Your Backyard This course asks students to engage in research to explore the laws within their community. FCLAS Criminal Justice 210 Victimology Definitions and scope of violent crime in society. Includes a review of the issues, prevalence, myths, policies, programs, and services aimed at victims of violent crimes FCLAS Criminal Justice 211 Crimes against Women & Children The expanding role of the courts, police, battered women shelters, victim/witness assistance programs, crisis intervention units, and legislation highlighted. Survey of changing social values about sex, changing criminal codes about sex crimes, changing law enforcement policies and procedures in prosecuting sex offenders, and emerging legal doctrines about privacy and sexual rights.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

41

FCLAS Criminal Justice 212 Race and the Criminal Justice System Explores the relationship between the criminal justice system and racial minorities in the United States. Seeks to understand some of the economic, political, and sociological reasons why racial minorities, particularly African-Americans, are over-represented in the criminal justice system. Explores normative issues of justice and equity in broader social interactions that influence and are influenced by crime and the criminal process. FCLAS Criminal Justice 213-214 Political Terrorism & International Law Analysis of diverse organizations using terror, starvation, torture, and murder for political objectives. FCLAS Criminal Justice 315 Justice and Youth Offenders Examination of the recent political history of American juvenile justice; the policies, trends, and programs in juvenile justice during the past two decades. Focus on historical developments, the full range of contemporary alternatives for counseling and treatment, legal issues and functions of juvenile justice agencies, an exploration of future directions, and a reform agenda for the next two decades. FCLAS Criminal Justice 316 Crisis Intervention Focuses on the conceptual framework for crisis intervention practice, including crisis theory, crisis concepts, crisis intervention models and strategies, and guidelines for evaluating program outcomes. FCLAS Criminal Justice 317 Independent Study Students work with Dr. Batten to design an independent project and research paper within the field. Students are encouraged to think of their topic as something that may also lead to publication in an academic journal.

History FCLAS courses in History FCLAS History 101 Introduction to World History This course fulfills history requirement in core curriculum. This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to World History. FCLAS History 400 Self Study This course is self-designed by the student with permission of Dr. Katherine Batten. FCLAS History 401 Women in History I This course introduces students to women in history from antiquity to the Middle Ages and the specific sociopolitical concerns of women as well as their place in society. FCLAS History 402 Women in History II This course explores women in history from the 1600s to the contemporary era and the specific sociopolitical concerns of women as well as their place in society. FCLAS History 403 Slavery in Human History This course explores slavery in human civilizations from around the world. FCLAS History 404 Genocide This course explores the history of genocide and the political response to it. FCLAS History 405 People in History This course explores critical individuals from history and their impact; topics vary from semester to semester. FCLAS History 406 The Holocaust and Its Narrative This course examines diverse narratives from survivors of the Holocaust, examining themes, concerns, and psychological and social impacts of the narrative process.

Saylor Courses SA HIST101: Ancient Civilizations of the World This course provides an introduction of the emergence of World History beginning with the Paleolithic Era and moving through the middle ages, examining how societies emerge. SA HIST102: Early Globalizations: East Meets West (1200s–1600s) This course looks at the emerging linkages between various continents and the specific social and political events that fostered these linkages. SA HIST103: World History in the Early Modern and Modern Eras (1600-Present) This course provides and overview of world history from the 17th century to the present era.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

42

SA HIST201: History of Europe, 1000 to 1800 This course examines the early history of European societies and the emergence of European nations. SA HIST202: History of Europe, 1800 to Present Prerequisite SA HIST 201. This course will extend upon the prior courses information and move into an examination of global influences on shaping Europe, including the two World Wars. SA HIST211: Introduction to the United States History: Colonial Period to Reconstruction This course examines the early history of the formation of the United States and its emergence as a Nation through the era of the Civil War. SA HIST212: Introduction to United States History: Reconstruction to the Present Prerequisite SA HIST 211. This course explores critical sociocultural events that have emerged post-Reconstruction to the present era. Including major sociopolitical movements and global conflicts. SA HIST221: Colonial Latin and South America This course begins examining the history of Latin and South America upon the arrival of European explorers and the impact of European colonization. SA HIST222: Modern Latin America This course looks at a post-Colonial Latin American and the major sociopolitical changes that emerged following liberation movements. SA HIST231: Empire and States in the Middle East and Southwest Asia This course explores the sociopolitical landscape of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from the pre-Islamic period through the end of World War I. SA HIST232: Modern Middle East and Southwest Asia Prerequisite SA HIST 231. This course examines the region post 1919 and looks at major sociopolitical developments, nation-building and modern challenges and conflicts that have been emerging. SA HIST241: Pre-Modern Northeast Asia This course looks at the early civilizations of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. SA HIST242: Modern Northeast Asia (research project assigned by FLCAS) Prerequisite SA HIST 242. This course examines contemporary issues emerging for and within Northeast Asia beginning in the late 1800s. SA HIST251: History of Africa to 1890 This course examines the complex and rich history of the African continent beginning with the emergence of our species and through the age of colonial rule and slavery. SA HIST252: Modern Africa This course looks specifically at the colonial period, the impact of decolonization, and the post-colonial period and into the present. SA HIST301: Greece, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire This course examines the early Mediterranean civilizations and how these ultimately would come to shape European culture. SA HIST302: Medieval Europe This course looks at social and political contexts of Europe in the Middle Ages, roughly between the 4th Century to 1500. SA HIST303: The Age of Revolutions in the Atlantic World, 1776–1848 This course examines the impact of sociopolitical revolutions such as the American Revolution and the French Revolution. SA HIST311: The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500–1900 This course critically examines the social and political contexts of the slave trade as it emerged in Europe and America and its eventual cessation. SA HIST312: Capitalism and Democracy in America This course examines the complex relationship between capitalism and the American political system. SA HIST313: War and American Society This course examines the history of War in the United States and how it has shaped the social, political, economic, and technological landscapes. SA HIST321: Comparative New Worlds, 1400–1750 This course examines individual societies that faced colonization by European Settlers and the impact of these events. SA HIST351: The Silk Road and Central Eurasia This course examines two aspects of the “Silk Road” the first is the impact of trade routes from China to Europe through Eurasia and the role this played in the emergence of nomadic peoples within these regions.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

43

SA HIST362: Modern Revolutions This course contextualizes the modern world through examination of critical political revolutions that emerged between the 1600s to the present time. SA HIST363: Global Perspectives on Industrialization Students explore the emergence and development of industrial societies around the world beginning in antiquity and move up through the historical period of the Industrial Revolution. SA HIST364: Environmental History This course examines the historical and contemporary relationships humankind has had with the environment and the critical outcomes of these relationships. SA HIST365: History of Technology This course explores the emergence of technology from antiquity through the modern era and the impact technological advancements have had on societies. Alison Courses Some of these courses are identical subjects offered with Saylor, students may choose which class they prefer. A 101 World History—The Rise of Fascism This course explores the political movement of fascism and its impact on the 20th century. A 102 World History—World War I and Its Aftermath This course explores the global impact and legacy of World War I.

Literature FCLAS courses in Literature FCLAS Literature 401 Special Topics in Poetry This course explores specific poets, styles, or poems in-depth and varies from semester to semester. FCLAS Literature 402 Special Topics in British Literature This course explores specific authors, genres, or texts in-depth and varies from semester to semester. FCLAS Literature 403 Women Authors This course explores several women authors and their contributions to literature and also central thematic concerns that emerge for women writers. FCLAS Literature 404 Trauma in Literature I This course looks at the role of trauma in the emergence of written literature and its impact of story-telling. Works examined include the Odyssey and Euripedes’ Medea. FCLAS Literature 405 Trauma in Literature II This course looks at more contemporary authors’ exploration of the traumatic narrative, including work by John Steinbeck, Toni Morrison, Dorothy Allison, Siegfried Sassoon, etc. FCLAS Literature 406 African American Literature I This course introduces students to the rich landscape of literature by African-American writers in the contemporary era, including Frederick Douglas and early writers emerging during the Reconstruction period in the US (post 1865) through the 1950s. FCLAS Literature 407 African American Literature II This course looks at African-American literature as it emerged during the Civil Rights movement and into the contemporary era. FCLAS Literature 408 Special Topics in American Literature This course explores specific concerns, texts, or authors writing within the United States and varies semester to semester. FCLAS Literature 409 Special Topics in Comparative Literature This course looks at Literature outside the English language and topics vary by semester. FCLAS Literature 410 Film as Literature I Students watch critical work in early film history through to 1950 and examine them as they would works of literature, exploring themes and styles and symbolic language; as well as the cultural contexts of each film.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

44

FCLAS Literature 411 Film as Literature II As with the prior class, students explore film from the 1950s to contemporary era for specific themes, styles, symbols, and social context. FCLAS Literature 412 Dramatic Works in Antiquity Students are introduced to the earliest known plays and examine their form and style. FCLAS Literature 413 Dramatic Works in the Renaissance through Romantic Period Students examine dramatic works from the Renaissance, extending outside of Shakespeare and through to 1799. FCLAS Literature 414 Dramatic Works in Late 19th Century Students begin to explore the emergence of the modern dramatic form in the late 19th century, including works by Ibsen and Shaw. FCLAS Literature 415 Dramatic Works through World War II Students examine dramatic works shortly before World War I and continuing through to the emergence of the Existentialist period. FCLAS Literature 416 Dramatic Works: Modern and Contemporary In this course students are introduced to major works of drama from the late 1950s to the contemporary era; this includes specific discussion on the emergence of non-White, non-Male authors. FCLAS Literature 417 Playwrights This course explores a variety of writers and varies semester to semester. FCLAS Literature 418 Self Study This course is self-designed by the student with permission of Dr. Katherine Batten. Saylor Courses SA ENGL001: English Composition I This course grounds students in the process of academic writing. SA ENGL002: English Composition II Prerequisite SA ENG 001. This course builds upon the prior level of course and begins to focus on specific techniques for research. SA ENGL101: Introduction to Literary Studies Required Course for All English Majors and a prerequisite for all higher-level English courses. This course introduces the prospective English Major to the field and discipline of studying literature. SA ENGL201: Medieval English Literature and Culture This course looks at a critical point in the development of literature in Western History and the emerging works during this period from a range of locations in Europe. SA ENGL202: Cultural and Literacy Expression in the English Renaissance This course introduces the student to key works of the early Renaissance period and the historical contexts that gave rise to the literature of the Renaissance. SA ENGL203: Cultural and Literacy Expression in the 18th and 19th Centuries This course examines major works emerging within the periods of the Enlightenment, Restoration, and Romantic movements and ending with a brief look at the emergence of the Victorian novel. SA ENGL204: Cultural and Literacy Expression in Modernity This course seeks to define what the modern movement was and how the literature of the period shaped in and was in turn shaped by it. SA ENGL301: Introduction to Literary Theory This course grounds the student in formal literary theory—that is the frameworks with which we may understand literary works and engage in textual criticism. SA ENGL401: Shakespeare This course introduces and critically examines several of Shakespeare’s critical works. SA ENGL402: The Poetry of John Milton This course introduces and critically examines the work of John Milton and what factors shaped his works. SA ENGL403: The Gothic Novel This course seeks to define and critically examine what is the “Gothic Novel” through several novels written between 1760s and the 1820s. SA ENGL404: English Romantic Poetry

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

45

This course examines several poets emerging within the Romantic period (1780s-1830s) and how their work was shaped by the overall romantic artistic movement. SA ENGL405: The American Renaissance This course looks at American literature during the period of 1830–1860s, including such writers as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Walt Whitman, Emerson, Thoreau, and Melville. SA ENGL406: James Joyce This course critically examines the work of James Joyce. SA ENGL407: Medieval Women Writers This course contextualizes the middle ages for students and introduces them to surviving literary works by women and under what contexts they wrote. SA ENGL408: Modern Poetry and Poetics This course explores poetry and the changing styles of writing poetry from the late 1890s into the 1960s and what sociocultural factors shaped the changing styles. SA ENGL409: Dante This course examines the work of Dante. SA ENGL410: The Victorian Novel This course examines the cultural period between 1837 and 1901 and its impact on the novel, with specific attention to the growing influence of women writers. SA ENGL411: African–American Literature This course examines the emergence of African–American literature from the oral tradition and the impact of enslavement upon literature. Critical works are studied through the period beginning with Oral Traditions movement through Literature of Slavery to modern movements in the 20th century. SA ENGL412: Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama This course explores dramatic work written in Europe between 1660 and 1800 and the cultural factors that shaped the burgeoning theater tradition.

Mathematics FCLAS courses in Mathematics FCLAS Mathematics 400 Literature in Math This course looks at how mathematicians attempt to communicate math concepts, discoveries, and the necessity of math in the modern era to the lay reader. FCLAS Mathematic 401 Self Study This course is self-designed by the student with permission of Dr. Katherine Batten. Saylor Courses SA MA001: Beginning Algebra In this course, students are introduced to basic algebraic operations and concepts. SA MA002: Precalculus I SA MA003: Precalculus II These courses are designed for students who have not had exposure to calculus during high school and are interested in pursuing fields in the sciences and in mathematics. Students are encouraged to take these courses even if they had calculus in high school as a review. SA MA004: Intermediate Algebra This course is a preparatory course that extends the student’s knowledge of algebraic concepts. It is strongly encouraged that the prospective math and science student take all introductory courses to math as a refresher. SA MA005: Calculus 1 This course introduces students to the study of calculus. SA MA101: Single-Variable Calculus I SA MA102: Single-Variable Calculus II

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

46

SA MA103: Multivariable Calculus Prerequisites SA MA 001–005, SA MA 221. These three calculus courses form the foundation of a mathematics major’s program and are designed to foster a student’s deeper understanding of calculus. Students should take the courses in order, following completion of each one. SA MA111: Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning This course explores major concepts that emerge within mathematics, with a specific focus on propositional logic and associated proofs. It is generally recommended to be taken after algebraic courses are completed and pre-Calculus or concurrent with Calculus I. SA MA121: Introduction to Statistics This course introduces the students to the field of statistics and foundational methods for data collection, descriptive statistics, probability, graphing, and random distribution. SA MA201: Mathematical Logic and Theory of Computation (FCLAS final project assigned) This introduces students to mathematical models of computation and their limitations and examines underlying theoretical constructs within this landscape. SA MA211: Linear Algebra I Prerequisite competency in Algebra and courses up through SA MA 103. This course introduces students to linear algebra and its functions within the broader scope of applied mathematics. SA MA221: Differential Equations This course introduces the differential equations and is a prerequisite for SA MA 101–103 and SA MA 211. SA MA231: Abstract Algebra I This course introduces students to the mathematical concepts embedded within what is known as “abstract algebra”. Students should have all their foundational mathematics courses completed prior to registering for this course. SA MA241: Real Analysis I This course explores in-depth the “real number system” and the foundations of calculus. Students should have completed all calculus-based courses prior to taking this course. SA MA212: Linear Algebra II This course extends the discussion and concepts examined in SA MA 211. SA MA213: Numerical Analysis Prerequisites: SA MA 211; SA MA 221, SA CS 101 (Introduction to Computer Science). This course introduces the student to the growing field of numerical analysis and its critical role in technological fields. Specifically students examine computer arithmetic as they function within algorithms. SA MA222: Introduction to Partial Differential Equations This course introduces students to what defines partial differential equations and their methods. SA MA232: Abstract Algebra II This courses is a continuation of SA MA 231 Abstract Algebra I and digs more deeply into the methods explored in the first class. SA MA233: Elementary Number Theory This course introduces elementary number theory through experimentation and a real-world understanding of its critical function in science and technology. SA MA242: Real Analysis II This course is a continuation of SA MA 241 and builds on techniques introduced in 241 and applies them to solving complex mathematical problems. SA MA243: Complex Analysis This course introduces the theory of analytic functions associated with complex variables. SA MA251: Statistics II This course extends the statistical methods described in SA MA 121 and begins to examine experimental design and hypotheses testing, including multiple and nonlinear regressions and nonparametric statistics. SA MA252: Introduction to Probability Theory This course introduces probability theory and the concept of random processes. SA MA304: Topics in Applied Mathematics (FLCAS final project assigned) This course introduces core theories and methods within applied mathematics.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

47

Sub-category Non-Mathematics Majors SA RWM 101: Foundations of Real World Math; RWM 102: Algebra; RWM 103: Geometry These three courses are designed for non-math majors and provide foundational knowledge in core mathematical concepts as they apply to dayto-day experiences.

Mechanical Engineering & Physics FCLAS courses in Mechanical Engineering FCLAS Mechanical Engineering and Physics 400 Self Study This course is self-designed by the student with permission of Dr. Katherine Batten. Saylor Courses SA PHYS101: Introduction to Mechanics SA PHYS102: Introduction to Electromagnetism Required for Mechanical Engineering Students. These two courses provide a critical foundation in core concepts in the field of physics and how they interact with other branches of science and the challenges that emerge when physical concepts cannot be applied. SA ME101: Introduction to Mechanical Engineering This course introduces students to the field of mechanical engineering and its relationships to physics, mathematics, and other sciences that influence the study, design, and manufacture of mechanical products and systems. SA ME102: Mechanics I This provides students with an introduction to the concepts of statics, solids, bending and fractures and how these elements respond to the physics’ concept of “force”. SA ME103: Thermodynamics This course introduces the fundamentals of thermodynamics, including the First and Second Laws, thermodynamic properties, ideal gases, and equation state. SA ME104: Computer-Aided Design (CAD) This courses introduces students to CAD programs and their role in mechanical engineering. Students will be working with T-FLEX CAD software. This is provided free online. SA ME201: Fluid Mechanics This course examines the definition of “fluid” and its associated properties and examines how these properties influence how the fluid responds to pressure and velocity variations. Specifically this course focuses on the applied use of fluid mechanics as it relates to piping systems and compression. SA ME202: Mechanics II—Dynamics Prerequisite SA PHYS 101; SA NE 102. This course examines Dynamics as a sub-branch of Mechanics and the specific examination of understanding what an object is doing in movement, known as Kinematics of Particles. SA ME203: Materials and Materials Processing This course introduces students to the two fields of Materials Engineering and Materials Science. It is a general introduction to the concerns of a material engineer and the materials scientist. SA ME204: Heat Transfer This course introduces students to the concept of heat transfer and what factors influence and how to calculate the rate of transfer. Additionally students will gain an overview of what role heat transfer plays in applied mechanics engineering. SA ME205: Numerical Methods for Engineers This course introduces mathematical concepts for the engineer. Students are encouraged to have taken core mathematics courses before beginning this course if they do not have adequate skill with general math. SA ME301: Measurement & Experimentation Laboratory This course introduces students to the mechanical engineering laboratory with an introduction in the process of measuring and interpreting data. SA ME302: Mechatronics This course explores the relationship between electrical systems and mechanical engineering. SA ME303: Thermal–Fluid Systems

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

48

This course examines the how fluids undergo change in a system and why the mechanical engineer needs to grasp these concepts. SA ME304: Engineering Communication This course empowers mechanical engineers to be able to effectively communicate mechanical concepts within a diverse work environment that includes a large number of individuals without specific knowledge, but who have a vested stake. SA ME401: Dynamic Systems & Controls Students are recommended to have completed foundational mathematical courses for this course, as wll as SA MA PHYS 101 and 102. This course introduces students to mathematical modeling analysis and control of physical systems when at rest, in motion, or acted upon by force. SA ME402: Design Decisions in Engineering This course introduces students to the process of design and the decision-making that must occur to implement designs. SA ME403: Student Design Project Prerequisite SA ME 104 and 402. Students in this course will apply their knowledge of mechanical engineering through the creation of their design project. SA SSE 101: Survey of Systems Engineering Co-designed between Saylor and NASA, this course introduces students to space systems engineering. Alison Courses Some of these courses are identical subjects offered with Saylor, students may choose which class they prefer. A 101 Diploma in Electrical Studies This course examines the fundamental concepts and practices within electrical engineering. A 102 Physics—Gravity This course examines in-depth the role of gravity in life and how it works. A 103 Physics—Introduction to Motion in Two Dimensions This course explores the role of motion in the field of physics and its calculation. A 104 Physics—Kinematics through Practice Examples This course introduces the student to the concept of kinematics, or how objects move. A 105 Physics—Motion, Speed, and Time This course looks at three fundamental concepts in physics and their role as a building block for understanding life. A 106 Physics—Normal and Contact Forces This course explores in-depth how force impacts objects and in what ways.

Philosophy FCLAS courses in Philosophy Please see Ocean Seminary College portion of this catalog. Saylor Courses SA PHIL101: Introduction to Philosophy This course provides an introduction to the study of philosophy, including major topics, problems and methods, as well as critical writings. SA PHIL102: Logic and Critical Thinking This course provides an introduction to critical thinking, informal logic, and a brief overview of formal logic. SA PHIL103: Moral and Political Philosophy This course introduces students the basic concepts and methods of moral and political philosophy. SA PHIL201: The Philosophy of Death This course explores the philosophical concerns surrounding death. SA PHIL202: Philosophy of Science This course examines the philosophical concerns that emerge with the practices and concepts of modern science.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

49

SA PHIL304: Existentialism This course examines critical figures in the existentialist movement through the historical development of the movement beginning with Pascal and Kierkegaard.

Political Science FCLAS courses in Political Science FCLAS Political Science 400 Self Study This course is self-designed by the student with permission of Dr. Katherine Batten. Saylor Courses SA GEOG101: World Regional Geography Required for Political Science majors. This course introduces students to the relationship between the physical characteristics and landscapes and the development of culture. SA ENVS504: Society, Economy, and the Environment Required for Political Science majors. This course looks at the bidirectional relationship of human beings and the environment. SA POLSC101: Introduction to Politics This course introduces students to the broad field of political science. SA POLSC201: Introduction to Western Political Thought This course looks at major texts in Western history that reflect the emergence of political thought and the ways in which how we thinking about human nature shapes the design of governments. SA POLSC211: Introduction to International Relations This course introduces the fundamental principles of international relations and foreign affairs. SA POLSC221: Introduction to Comparative Politics In this course, students are introduced to the comparative method of understanding global political environments, diverse cultures, and to understand broad social issues. SA POLSC231: Introduction to American Politics This course introduces the student to the structure of the American government and the primary concerns and theoretical perspectives associated with understanding American politics at the broadest level as well as focused upon the political culture, the Constitution, and federalism. SA POLSC241: Introduction to Public Administration This courses examines the field of public administration with a specific focus on what separates management of a public organization versus private-sector organization. SA POLSC251: Research Methods in Political Science This course provides students with grounding in strategies to engage in research within the field of political science. SA POLSC301: American Political Thought This course examines United States political thought through a historical examination beginning with the early republic through the 1960s. SA POLSC302: Contemporary Political Thought This course examines major political theorists from the 1700s to the present. SA POLSC303: Feminist Politics This course examines critical issues and questions within feminist politics, including political participation, reproductive rights, medial representation of women, etc. SA POLSC311: United States Foreign Policy This course looks at the history, theory and current perspectives on foreign policy issues within the United States. SA POLSC312: International Organizations This course examines the process of governing and the institution of government in various nations and how these play roles in global affairs. SA POLSC313: US Intelligence and National Security

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

50

This course introduces to students current theory and practice of national security and threat assessment through critical examination of United States processes. SA POLSC321: Mideast Politics This course addresses the complex historical and contemporary political landscape within the diverse nations of the Middle East. SA POLSC322: Asia-Pacific Politics This course will introduce students to the international relations of the Asia–Pacific region as they interact with each other and with the broader global landscape. SA POLSC323: European Politics This course looks at contemporary European political structures and their historical antecedents. SA POLSC324: Latin American/Caribbean Politics This course introduces students to the politics of Latin and Caribbean nations. SA POLSC325: African Politics This course provides an introduction to the student about the historical and contemporary political landscapes of various nations in Africa. SA POLSC331: Congressional Politics This course introduces students to history of and ongoing challenges that emerge within the Congressional branch of the United States government. SA POLSC332: The Presidency and the Executive Branch This course looks at the United States political structure specific to the President and the functioning of the Executive Branch. SA POLSC333: Campaigns and Elections This course critically examines the United States political process as it emerges within the campaign and election domains. Students of other nations may register for this course and engage in independent research about the political processes in their own nation, utilizing the material of this course as a guiding structure of what factors to examine. SA POLSC401: Ethics and Public Policy This course examines the role of ethics, culture, religious and moral perspectives that may shape public policy. SA POLSC402: Global Justice This course examines the perspectives of human rights through a global view. SA POLSC411: International Political Economy This course provides an introduction to the field of international political economy, which is defined by the intersection between economic and political structures. SA POLSC412: International Law (FLCAS assigned final project) This course introduces the fundamental principles of international law and examines the historical development of major international laws. SA POLSC431: Public Policy Process This course introduces students to the developmental process of determining and implementing public policies. SA POLSC432: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights This course examines the history of the civil rights movements in the United States and the role of civil liberties in United States judicial system.

Psychology FCLAS courses in Psychology FCLAS Psychology 400 Self Study This course is self-designed by the student with permission of Dr. Katherine Batten. FCLAS Psychology 401 Understanding Personality Disorders I This course introduces students to the subject of personality disorders and its history and controversies. FCLAS Psychology 402 Understanding Personality Disorders II This course looks in-depth at the various classifications of disorders and their clinical application and challenges. FCLAS Psychology 405 Research Methods in Psychology

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

51

This course introduces students to research methodology protocols in psychology, with a rudimentary introduction to statistics. FCLAS Psychology 406 DSM-V This introduces students to the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association. It explores the organization of the text, the research behind the text, and its current controversies. FCLAS Psychology 402 Children with Disabilities This course introduces students to the topic of children with disabilities and specific concerns. It examines closely the underlying biopsychosocial model of development and why psychology plays such a critical role in informing strategies in working with children with disabilities. FCLAS Psychology 403 Psychodynamic Theory I This course introduces students to the early history of psychodynamic theory and its role in fundamentally shaping the field of psychology. FCLAS Psychology 404 Psychodynamic Theory II This course looks at how psychodynamic theory changed post-Freud and how it remains a strikingly different alternative to the medical model of mental disorders. This course will explore the PDM (Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual). Students are recommended to have taken the course on the DSM-V prior to taking this. FCLAS Psychology 405 Critical Thinkers This course varies by semester and explores critical researchers and thinkers within the field of psychology. FCLAS Psychology 406 Special Topics in Disorders This course varies by semester and explores in-depth specific psychological disorders, their research, key concepts and criticisms. FCLAS Psychology 406 Family Systems This course introduces students to family systems theory and methods of understanding the family unit within mental health and the clinical landscape. Saylor Courses SA PSYCH101-EXC: Introduction to Psychology This course introduces the student to the fundamental principles of psychology and the concerns associated with psychological inquiry. SA PSYCH202A: Research Methods SA PSYCH202B: Research Methods Lab This two-part course introduces students to the practical concerns of researching psychological issues. Students are provided with foundational information about conducting research and being able to interpret research conducted by other individuals within the field. SA PSYCH205: Clinical Psychology This course explores the basic concepts of clinical psychology, specifically the process of diagnosing, treating and understanding abnormal/maladaptive behavior. SA PSYCH206: Cognitive Psychology This course examines the study of the mind and how we come to “know” about the world around us. SA PSYCH301: Social Psychology This course examines the domain of social psychology, which examines the ways in which we interact with each other and “think” about social phenomena. SA PSYCH302: Lifespan Development This course examines the psychobiological chances that occur as an individual ages in their lives, from birth to death. SA PSYCH303: Educational Psychology This course examines the structure of education systems and how they impact cognitive and emotional development in students. Generally this subfield of psychology, is concerned with improving educational structures to encourage positive environments for learning. SA PSYCH304: Industrial/Organizational Psychology This course examines the subfield of psychology concerned with how individuals interact with each other within an organization/work environment and how they individual interact with the work environment. SA PSYCH305: Psychology of Learning and Behavior This course looks specifically at how individuals acquire information and how behavior is shaped within an environment. SA PSYCH306: Sensation and Perception This course examines how the brain comes to know the world through sensory and perceptive inputs. PSYCH 401: Abnormal Behavior

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

52

This course looks at what defines abnormal behavior and the current debates and theories of what causes various psychological disorders. SA PSYCH402: Neuropsychology This course examines the relationship between neuroscience and psychology and explores the underpinnings of the physiology of the brain as it relates to manifestations of behavior. SA PSYCH403: Cultural Psychology This course examines multicultural perspectives within psychology with a specific examination of assessing individuals within their sociocultural milieu. SA PSYCH404: Psychotherapy This course examines the role of counseling in ameliorating psychological disorders and introduces basic concepts and strategies of psychotherapy. SA PSYCH406: Gender and Sexuality This course examines current theories and research in how gender and sexual difference impact cognition, affect, and behavior. Alison Courses A 101 Diploma in Social Work Studies This course explores the role of the social worker and central concerns and responsibilities.

Sociology FCLAS courses in Sociology FCLAS Sociology 400 Structural Violence & Social Change I This introduces students to the concept of structural violence and the importance of its recognition. FCLAS Sociology 401 Structural Violence & Social Change II This course extends the discussion from course one and examines specific strategies to combat structural violence. FCLAS Sociology 402 Understanding Violence in Societies This course looks at how violence emerges in societies both within the domestic spheres and the national/global landscapes. FLCAS Sociology 403 Discrimination This course focuses on how discrimination emerges and what it is. FLCAS Sociology 404 Relational Aggression This course examines new research focused on aggressive behavior seen within women and communities where overt expression is prohibited. FCLAS Sociology 405 Reconciliation & Peace This course looks at strategies emerging within sociology and psychology on how to reduce conflict and promote peace within communities and societies. Further it looks at how cultures within long-standing conflicts may reconcile differences. FCLAS Sociology 406 The Individual and Society This course looks at the role of the individual within society. FCLAS Sociology 407 Social Construction This course examines the theoretical framework of social construction as postulated by Kenneth Gergen. FCLAS Sociology 407 The Saturated & Post-Modern Self This course examines the post World–War-Two and post-Nuclear individual as he/she is conceptualized in society. FCLAS Sociology 408 Farenheit 451: Modernity, Technology, and the Future This course looks at how society reflects understanding of globalization, environmental catastrophe, and potentials for global conflicts.

FCLAS Sociology 407 Self Study This course is self-designed by the student with permission of Dr. Katherine Batten.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

Saylor Courses SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology This course introduces central concepts of sociology and its focus of studying the structure of society and the interactions between individuals and culture.

53

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

54

Ocean Seminary College

Mission Statement Ocean Seminary College (OSC) is committed to providing excellence in Shamanistic, Neopagan, and traditional and contemporary faith-based education to facilitate each student’s intellectual growth; personal transformation and well-being; and a restored, ecstatic connection with the Earth and the Divine through a nondiscriminatory community of seekers. About OSC Ocean Seminary College opened its virtual doors in March 2005 under the framework that seminary education needed to meet the needs of a rapidly changing world. As our world is shrinking culturally and as our ecological stability is diminishing, seminarians and theologians play a crucial role in fostering peace, compassion, openness, and understanding between cultures and between humans and Nature. OSC seeks to support students in their spiritual and religious journeys to become key touchstones for the public to understand the divine and manifest this in their day-to-day lives and the larger political and social realities of nations. As such, OSC was founded on the notion that a spiritual integration of ecological awareness and a felt-connection to Nature coupled with respectful grounding in faiths different from one's own primary faith are critical for a seminarian and theologian in order to meet the challenges of the 21st Century. OSC meets these challenges in two specific ways. First it is the only seminary in the US that provides a fully diverse program of study, where all faiths are represented and encouraged. Students may elect to focus on their religion of calling or to explore other faiths—yet all students are required to engage in shared dialogue and to grow in appreciation for the multiplicity of the Divine. OSC does not foster exclusionary beliefs that only one path reflects ultimate truth, but rather fosters not only tolerance but joyfulness in exploring the many revelations of the Divine. In addition to creating an active spiritual and scholarly climate of diversity, OSC is also grounded upon the notion that Nature is central to any spirituality that seeks to reveal and embody the presence of the Divine. As such, all students are required to participate in coursework that grounds them in: (a) the latest scientific theories emerging in ecology, (b) ecologically minded ethics and theological frameworks revealing the Divine within Nature, and (c) self-exploration to identify how their own unique spiritual paths can facilitate ecologically responsible behavior. Vision The seminary was founded upon the goal of educating men and women to become seminarians, religious leaders, and theologians who embody inner peace, wholeness, and a profound sense of connectedness to the sacred web of life. It is a seminary that values a vision of connectedness, which students are called to experience through immersion, exploration, self-reflection, nurturing, generating, openness and reception, communication, and transformation. Goals

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

55

Ocean Seminary College has several goals: 1. To provide a sacred and religious learning environment that is open to all individuals regardless of gender, sexual orientation, faith, economic status, religion, race and ethnicity, and health status. 2. To provide an academic environment that offers depth and breadth of focus and superior scholarship through fully integrated distance-learning education. 3. To support the development of a non-competitive learning fellowship. 4. To provide students with opportunities to come together as a spiritual community during sacred calendar days and days of prayer. 5. To create an experiential and academic environment that promotes critical thinking, self-exploration, research, and divine communion. 6. To produce graduates who have a strong sense of religious and spiritual identity coupled with superior scholarship skills capable of acting as responsible healers, comforters, and religious and community leaders in their program of study. 7. To facilitate a personal connection with the Earth as a living and en-souled being. 8. To empower the religious leaders of tomorrow with the capacity to incorporate the sacred Earth as an essential part of their ministerial practices. An Online Community of Faith Connectedness is a guiding principle of this seminary and as such one of the primary modes of educational delivery occurs through seminary program and course discussion boards and community sites, as well as through live online class discussions. Yet, while groups are often rewarding, they can also elicit anxiety and in some cases can become harmful. While psychotherapy groups are often overseen by extensive ethics boards and law, spiritual groups do not have the same oversight and rather must rely on the ethics of the members involved. As such, OSC has established its core ethics as follows: 1. Compassion, openness, awareness, insight, respect, protection, and boundaries guide the college’s structure, interaction, and community. As such, you will never be asked to engage in any activity that violates your safety (psychological, physical, or spiritual) and personal boundaries (sexual solicitation, nudity, inappropriate language, threatening/abusive language/behavior, etc.). Students who violate these guidelines will be promptly dismissed from this institution. 2. Free will is of utmost importance and as such, you may continue or discontinue your studies at any time without harassment or explanations required. 3. Your spiritual beliefs are ultimately your own and as such OSC encourage you to ask questions and blend what you feel is truthful to you. You do not need to give up any religious/spiritual affiliations that you hold with other groups or systems of faith. OSC encourages you to be as discriminate about information you read or discuss.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

56

4. Confidentiality and safety within the group is very important. OSC asks that each student respect the confidentiality of each other and recognize that as a spiritual institution, some members may share painful experiences in their lives. Creating an expansive, encouraging environment is the responsibility of all students and staff; OSC will discontinue the studies of individuals who engage in harmful responses, such as discriminatory, judgmental, or degrading feedback. 5. OSC firmly believes that learning is cooperative. With that said, please never hesitate to ask questions at any time or to contribute your own thoughts. No one individual (or religion) has a corner on the spiritual market. Social Change & Religious Diversity At the time of writing this, there are no federally recognized accreditation boards that oversee seminary education in non-traditional religious paths. Further there are no accredited seminaries offering extensive and depth studies in non-traditional religious paths at any leading colleges and universities within the United States. When courses are offered in non-traditional neo-pagan based beliefs, they are typically viewed as curiosities or as an attempt of the program to illustrate religious tolerance. The widespread absence of academic studies reflects a deeper issue that persists in the United States of religious intolerance and the disenfranchisem*nt and inhibition of Earth-based practitioners to overtly express their beliefs, easily find fellowship and community, and gain access to the wider academic discourse and social structures of privilege. In this fashion, Ocean Seminary College seeks to empower women and men with non-traditional Earth-based and mystical beliefs through affiliation with a rigorous and scholarly program, the conferring of advanced degrees, a firm access to a community of like-minded individuals, and the skills to negotiate the public life and to become advocates for social change within their communities. Linked with the goal of aiding in the liberation of Earth-based religious practices from stigma and prejudice, are the related themes of equality among living beings on Earth. As such, students of this seminary are expected to actively engage in the promotion of equal rights among all. In order for any religious faith to be recognized and accepted, it must be nested within a culture that increasingly values all members without prejudicial and institutionalized fears. In this fashion the success of true equality among the stigmatized members of our society, is intimately related to the success of religious freedom and right to education and worship. Earth Consciousness As the name of the seminary suggests, the role of the Earth is central to all aspects of this school. Religious institutions and dogma, as well as spiritual frameworks and individually held beliefs, are powerful sources for shaping how we see and act toward the Earth—both as a whole and the individual living beings who share our world with us. Over the centuries of human culture-building the voice of the Earth has become muted at best and at worse extinguished. Such an absence in the daily lives of women, men, and children has created avenues of illness, disillusionment, and loss. Many individuals can feel this loss while others simply act in increasingly consuming ways to fulfill the needs left raw from separation. As such, the school sees its position as a vital source of change and advocacy on behalf of the Earth itself and on restoring the human community to the Earth. In this fashion, the education of each student is framed within a growing sense of their own reconnection to the Earth and the development of a spiritual language to articulate the value of the Earth and our relationship to it.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

57

OSC: Departments & Program Overviews As a multi-faith teaching seminary, the primary goal is to provide students with access to a wide-range of courses and degrees that support each individual’s personal spiritual identity and their professional religious one. To meet this need, Ocean Seminary College has seven main academic departments: The Department of Shamanic Studies  Program: o World Shamanism (Ordination available) The Department of Neopagan Studies  Programs: o Neopagan Theology o Women’s Spirituality/Thealogy (Ordination available) o Wiccan Philosophy (Ordination available) o Divination Studies (Professional Certifications) The Department of Traditional Religious Studies  Programs: o Interreligious Studies (Ordination available) o Christian Studies (Ordination available) o Judaism o Islam o Buddhism o Taoism o Hinduism The Department of Theological Studies  Programs: o Feminist Theology o Religious Philosophy o Theology o Mysticism The Department of Ecology & Environmental Religious Studies  Programs: o Ecotheology o Religious Naturalism (Ordination available) o Environmental Philosophy The Department of Ecopsychology & Pastoral Counseling  Programs: o Ecopsychology (Certification) o Pastoral Care (Certification)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

58

The Department of Spiritual and Religious Art  Subspecialities: o Shamanism o Goddess o Earth-based o Traditional Religious Art & Iconography o Mixed-Religious Art The Department of Contemporary Spiritualities & Professional Development  Programs: o Compassionate Lifestyle Coach Careworker (Certification) o A Course in Miracles study program and teacher certification o Contemporary Spiritualities (Ordination available) OSC offers advanced degrees depending upon a student’s education experience:  Masters of Divinity (M.Div) for students holding an undergraduate degree from an undergraduate institution;  Masters of Divinity, Honoris Causa (M.Div,[h.c]), an honorary masters degree for students who do not hold an undergraduate degree, but who complete a master’s thesis  Seminarian of Divinity (S.Div) for students who do not hold an undergraduate degree and opt not to complete a thesis;  Doctorate of Ministry (D.Min) for students who have a masters degree within their religious field of expertise;  Doctorate of Ministry, Honoris Causa (D.Min [h.c.]) for students who do not hold an undergraduate degree, but who have extensive experience in direct ministerial leadership AND who have obtained their M.Div degree at Ocean Seminary College;  Divination Studies certification (specific to modality studied; ie: tarot certification, etc.);  Compassionate Lifestyle Coach and Careworker certification;  A Course in Miracles teacher certification. OSC provides three main tracks based on career goals of: (a) university teaching/research (Scholarship Track), (b) community/ministerial work (Ministerial Track); and (c) combined teacher preparation/ministerial work (Combined Scholar-Ministerial Track). Ministerial/Ordination tracts require supervised internships; while scholarship tracks typically require engagement in research. The combined track is typically longer to achieve and requires both internship and research. Department of World Shamanism Shamanism is a general term to describe a constellation of earth-based spiritual traditions and is a lifelong learning process. At OSC students may opt for a degree in World Shamanism, which emphasizes becoming well-grounded in both the global indigenous roots of shamanism as a religious practice and its current and varied manifestations as a new religious movement. At the doctoral level, students in World Shamanism can choose to either develop their own personal initiatory path, creating a coherent and personal tradition of shamanism based on their grounding in academic knowledge and their personal spiritual vision, while

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

59

being mentored; or further develop academic exploration of a pre-existing path. Students in this department learn through a combination of independent study, self-paced directed study, live online seminars, and class/group study. Department of Neopagan Studies The seminary offers scholarly and experiential study along four broad paths typically linked with Neopaganism religious movement: (1) Neopagan Theology, (2) Goddess Thealogy/Women’s Spirituality, (3) Wiccan Philosophy, and professional training in (4) Divination studies. Students participate in independent study, self-paced directed study, online class discussion, and live class discussions, as well as those pursuing ordination or divination certification actual supervised internships. Students may elect to pursue a scholarly, ministerial, or combined degree through this department Department of Traditional Religious Studies The goal of this department is to provide individuals committed to a traditional faith with an opportunity to deepen their scholarly and religious experience through coursework and internship. Individuals may pursue a focus specifically on their religion or pursue an interreligious degree. Each tradition emphasizes an ecocentric reinterpretation, whereby Nature serves to illuminate actively the presence of the Divine. Department of Theology and Religious Philosophy The goal of this department is to provide students who are interested in learning about the underlying architecture of religion and how religions come to understand concepts of the divine. Additionally within this department is the newly reorganized program of Contemplative Studies which allows students the option of exploring mysticism and contemplation as pathways individuals have come to know god (versus “Reason-based” methods seen in philosophy and theology) with an option of working within a monastic role. Department of Ecology & Environmental Religious Studies The goal of this department is to provide those seeking education or ordination from this seminary with the necessary core skills in reconnecting to the Earth from scientific, philosophical, and theo/alogical perspectives. Several courses in this department are designed to provide working knowledge to the religious leaders of tomorrow in Earth sciences. Further, students may elect to formally study:  Religious Naturalism, an atheistic religious/philosophical system that blends science, psychology, and aesthetics into a cohesive sacred whole;  Ecotheology, a dynamic theistic re-visioning of Christianity that merges science with traditional Christian thought; and  Ecosophy & Environmental Philosophy, a rich atheistic and diverse field rich that merges spiritual wisdom with critical examinations of ethics and environmental philosophical frameworks for a deeper connection to the Natural world.

Department of Ecopsychology & Pastoral Counseling The goal of this department is two-fold: (a) to provide essential counselor training for all students pursuing ordination who wish to obtain the subspecialty certification in pastoral care and (b) to provide students

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

60

with more formal training in Ecopsychology, an ecologically and spiritually whole system of psychology. This latter degree program is designed to empower religious leaders with a formal ecocentric mode of psychology to enhance traditional pastoral counselor skills and also their critical thinking about human/Nature relationships and the underlying psychological architecture of religion and society. Department of Spiritual & Religious Art The goal of this department is to provide students who experience their spirituality through creative forms opportunities to develop these abilities. It recognizes that an essential aspect of spirituality and religious impulses down through the centuries of human evolution have been deeply situated with artistic expressions. From cave art to grand symphonies, architectural masterpieces, and epic story-telling— creativity has been an intimate partner with spiritual revelations. Students who feel called to express their spiritual beliefs through art may do so related to one of the many specific religions taught at OSC or through a more mixed/eclectic spiritual impulse. Note: this is not an artistic training program, students admitted to this program have formal education in their chosen area of art and/or bachelor’s degrees in art. Portfolio submission is required. Department of Contemporary Spiritualities and Professional Development This department is focused on two goals (1) to provide academic grounding in modern spiritualty beliefs that fall outside specific religious orientations and (2) two specific professional development programs for students. The first is the Compassionate Lifestyle Coach and Careworker certification study program. This program is a year-long study in the field of compassion and how to assist others in building a greater sense of peace and compassion in their lives without adherence to one specific religious framework. The second program is a year-long study of A Course in Miracles and related texts, followed by a second year of teacher-training for interested students.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

61

OSC Program Requirements at a Glance

01 World Shamanism Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 01.01.001 History of Shamanism 01.01.002 Anthropology of Shamanism 01.01.003 Survey of Shamanic Traditions 01.01.004 Shamanism in Psychology 01.01.005 Shamanic Ecstasy 01.01.006 The Shaman 06.02.001 Foundations in Counseling 01.01.021 Ethics & Professional Practice 01.01.022 Shamanic Counseling I 01.01.026 Elements of Ritual 01.01.032 Shamanic Practicum 01.01.033 Master’s Thesis

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0   

Track 2: Ministerial   62 3.0   

Track 3: Combined   80 3.0   

  NO

  

  

NO

NO NO NO 

   

   

01 World Shamanism Doctoral Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Master’s Core Courses Master’s Degree 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 01.01.034 World Shamanism Dissertation 01.01.023 Shamanic Counseling II 01.01.024 Shamanic Healing I 01.01.025 Shamanic Healing II 01.01.031 Defining Your Shamanic Tradition 01.01.032 Shamanic Practicum

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 59 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters 

Track 2: Ministerial   63 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters 

Track 3: Combined   81 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters 

NO

NO NO NO

  

  

NO

02.01 Neopagan Theology Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 02.01.001 Neopaganism in Contemporary Society

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0  

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

02.01.002 Neopagan Theology 02.01.003 Sociology of Neopaganism 02.01.004 Stigmatization of the Witch in History 02.01.022 Master’s Thesis

62

   

02.02 Goddess Thealogy/Women’s Spirituality Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 02.01.004 Stigmatization of the Witch in History 02.02.001 Goddess Traditions in Contemporary Society I 02.02.002 Goddess Traditions in Contemporary Society II 02.02.003 Historical Roots of Goddess Worship 02.02.004 Introduction to Thealogy 02.02.005 Matriarchal Myth I 02.02.006 Matriarchal Myth II 02.02.007 Matriarchal Myth III 02.02.011 Birth, Death, Regeneration 02.02.014 Thealogy & Deasophy 02.01.005 Sacred Groves: Covens & Neopagan Groups 02.01.006 Ethics & Professional Practice 02.01.007 Ritual & Liturgy 02.01.017 Role of Priest/Priestess 02.02.012 Goddess Wheel of the Year 02.02.019 Goddess Priestess Practicum 02.02.020 Master’s Thesis

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0            NO NO NO NO NO NO 

Track 2: Ministerial   680 3.0                  

Track 3: Combined   80 3.0                  

02.02 Goddess Thealogy/ Women’s Spirituality Doctoral Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Master’s Core Courses

02.02.021 Goddess Thealogy Dissertation 02.01.008 Crisis of Faith & Inspiration 02.01.009 Empowering Members 02.01.014 Crafting Rites for Neopagan Clergy 02.01.015 Death & Dying 02.02.013 Goddess Ritual Theory 02.02.015 Advanced Thealogical Praxis I 02.02.016 Advanced Theaological Praxis II 02.02.017 High Priestes 02.02.019 Goddess Priestess Practicum

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 59 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters  NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO

Track 2: Ministerial   63 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters          

Track 3: Combined   81 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters          

02.03 Wiccan Philosophy Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0 

Track 2: Ministerial   680 3.0 

Track 3: Combined   80 3.0 

Master’s Degree 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

63

02.01.004 Stigmatization of the Witch in History 02.03.001 Historical Roots of Wicca 02.03.003 Philosophical Themes of Wicca 02.03.004 The God & Symbols 02.03.005 The Goddess & Symbols 02.03.006 Philosophical Concepts in Wicca 02.03.007 The Charge of the Goddess 02.03.008 The Charge of the God 02.03.009 Introduction to Wicca Ritual 02.01.005 Sacred Groves: Covens & Neopagan Groups 02.01.006 Ethics & Professional Practice 02.01.017 Role of the Priest and Priestess 02.03.018 Wicca Priest/ess Practicum 02.03.019 Master’s Thesis

02.03 Wiccan Philosophy Doctoral Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Master’s Core Courses Master’s Degree 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 02.03.020 Wiccan Philosophy Dissertation 02.01.008 Crisis of Faith & Inspiration 02.01.009 Empowering Members 02.01.014 Crafting Rites for Neopagan Clergy 02.01.015 Death & Dying 02.03.010 Sabbats I 02.03.011 Sabbats II 02.03.012 Esbats 02.03.016 Crafting One’s Craft 02.03.018 Wicca Priest/ess Practicum

02.04 Divination Studies

         NO NO NO NO 

             

             

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 59 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters  NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO

Track 2: Ministerial   63 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters          

Track 3: Combined   81 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters          

Track 1: Tarot

Track 2: Rune

 40 3.0    

 40 3.0    

Professional Certification Required Credits Required GPA Mastery Courses 02.04.001 Foundations in Divination 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 02.04.030 Divination Practicum

03.01 Interreligious Studies Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 02.01.001 Neopaganism in Contemporary Society 03.01.001 Religion in Prehistory

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0   

Track 3: Astrology

 40 3.0    

Track 4: General Studies NO 40 3.0 NO   NO

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

64

      

03.01.002 Study of Religion 03.01.003 Comparative Religious Studies 03.01.004 Sociology of Religion 02.01.006 Introduction to Theology: A Global Perspective 03.01.019 Interreligious: A Religion of Integration I 03.01.020 Interreligious: A Religion of Integration II 03.01.031 Interreligious Master’s Thesis 03.01 Interreligious Doctoral Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Master’s Core Courses Master’s Degree 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 03.01.032 Interreligious Dissertation 03.01.011 Religion and War I 03.01.012 Religion and War II 03.01.013 Models of Forgiveness & Reconciliation 03.01.014 Perspectives & Practice of Loving Kindness 03.01.015 Sexual Identity & Religion 03.021 Theosophies & Ethics of Interreligious Spirituality 03.01.022 Interspiritual Narratives 03.01.009 The Afterlife: Religious Perspectives on Death & Dying 03.01.016 Faith Development in Context 03.01.023 Interreligious Homiletics I 03.01.024 Interreligious Homiletics II 03.01.026 Interreligious Liturgy I 03.01.027 Interreligious Liturgy II 03.01.030 Interreligious Practicum

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 59 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters    

Track 2: Ministerial   63 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters    

 

 

 

 NO

 

 

NO

No No NO NO NO

    

    

03.02 Christian Studies Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 03.02.001 Introduction to Biblical Studies 03.02.002 Christianity Within an Historical Context 03.02.003 A Survey of the New Testament 03.02.007 The Life of Jesus: In Context and Meaning 03.02.008 The Life of Paul & His Impact 03.02.009 Theologies & Politics of Martin Luther & the Reformation 03.02.010 Survey of Patristic Writings 03.02.012 Christian Theologies: A Survey 03.02.017 Divisions: The Plurality of Christianity in Contemporary Society 03.02.034 Master’s Thesis

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0           

Track 3: Combined   81 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters    

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

03.02 Christian Studies Doctoral Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Master’s Core Courses Master’s Degree 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 03.02.035 Christian Dissertation 03.02.014: Theologies of Disability I 03.02.015 Theologies of Disability II 03.02.016 Embodiment & Sexuality 03.02.005 Biblical Exegesis I 03.02.006 Biblical Exegesis II 03.02.026 Christian Homiletics I 03.02.037 Christian Homiletics II 03.02.029 Christian Liturgy I 03.02.030 Christian Liturgy II 03.02.031 Christian Educator 03.02.033 Christian Clergy Practicum

65

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 59 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters  NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO

Track 2: Ministerial   63 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters            

03.03 Judaism Studies Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 03.03.001 Jewish History: A Culture & a Faith 03.03.002 A Survey of the Tanakh 03.03.003 Midrash: Jewish Exegesis I 03.03.004 Midrash: Jewish Exegesis II 03.03.008 The Talmud & the Rabbinical Tradition I 03.03.009 The Talmud & the Rabbinical Tradition II 03.03.013 Jewish Theologies I 03.03.014 Jewish Theologies II 03.03.025 Master’s Thesis

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0          

03.04 Islamic Studies Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 03.04.001 Introduction to the Islamic Faith 03.04.002 Contemporary Issues in Islam 03.04.003 The Prophet Muhammad 03.04.004 Holy Qur’an I 03.04.005 Holy Qur’an II 03.04.006 Introduction to the Hadith 03.04.010 Islamic Theology I 03.04.011 Islamic Theology II 03.04.012 Islamic Theology III 03.04.021 Master’s Thesis

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0           

03.05 Buddhist Studies Master’s Degree

Track 1: Scholarship 

Track 3: Combined   81 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters            

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 03.05.001 Introduction to Buddhism 03.05.002 Siddhartha Gautama as Buddha 03.05.003 Buddhist Philosophy I 03.05.004 Buddhist Philosophy II 03.05.005 The Four Noble Truths & The Noble Eightfold Path 03.05.006 Readings in Vinaya Pitaka: The Ethics of Buddha 03.05.007 Readings in Suttanta Pitaka: The Discourses of Buddha 03.05.008 Readings in Abhidhamma Pitaka: The Metaphysics of Budda 03.05.021 Master’s Thesis

66

NO 58 3.0          

03.06 Taoism & Chinese Philosophy Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 03.05.001 Chinese Philosophy I 03.05.002 Chinese Philosophy II 03.06.004 Ancestors and Gods 03.06.005 Tao Te Ching 03.06.006 Wu-Forms: Effortless Action 03.06.007 The Inner Chapters 03.06.014 Master’s Thesis

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0        

03.07 Hindu Studies Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 03.07.001 Introduction to Hinduism & Indian History I 03.07.002 Introduction to Hinduism & Indian History II 03.07.003 Vedic Literature I 03.07.004 Vedic Literature II 03.07.005 Upanishads 03.07.006 Readings in the Ramayana and Mahabharata I 03.07.007 Readings in the Ramayana and Mahabharata II 03.07.020 Hindu Ethics 03.07.023 Hinduism Master’s Thesis

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0          

04.01 Feminist Theology Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 04.01.001 Contextualizing Women in Religion I

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0  

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

04.01.002 Contextualizing Women in Religion II 04.01.003 Feminism and World Religions I 04.01.004 Feminism and World Religions II 04.01.005 Feminist Theology I 04.01.006 Feminist Theology II 04.01.007 Feminist Theology III 04.01.008 Feminist Theology IV 04.01.009 Feminist Theology V 04.01.019 Master’s Thesis 04.01 Feminist Theology Doctoral Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Master’s Core Courses Master’s Degree 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred

67

         Track 1: Scholarship  NO 59 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters

04.02 Theology Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 03.01.006 Introduction to Theology: A Global Perspective 04.03.001 Introduction to Philosophy 04.03.002 Religious Philosophy I 04.03.003 Religious Philosophy I 04.02.001 Negative/Apophatic Theology I 04.02.002 Natural Theology I 04.02.003 Natural Theology II 04.02.004 Process Theology I 04.02.005 Process Theology II 04.02.006 Systematic Theology I 04.02.006 Systematic Theology II 04.01.019 Master’s Thesis

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0             

04.02 Theology Doctoral Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Master’s Core Courses

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 59 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters          

Master’s Degree 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 04.02.008 Liberation Theology 04.02.009 Postcolonial Theology 04.02.010 Queer Theology 04.02.011 Moral Theology I 04.02.012 Moral Theology II 04.02.013 Historical Theology 04.02.014 Radical Theology & Liberal Theologies 04.02.015 Open Theology I 04.02.016 Open Theology II 04.02.020 Theology Dissertation

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

68

04.02 Religious Philosophy Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 04.03.001 Introduction to Philosophy 04.03.002 Religious Philosophy I 04.03.003 Religious Philosophy I 04.03.004 Epistemology & Religious Experience I 04.03.005 Epistemology & Religious Experience II 04.03.006 Metaphysical Philosophy of Aristotle 04.03.007 Medieval Religious Philosophers I 04.03.008 Medieval Religious Philosophers II 04.03.009 Early Enlightenment & Religion I 04.03.010 Early Enlightenment & Religion II 04.03.011 Middle and Late Enlightenment Period & Religion I 04.03.012 Middle and Late Enlightenment Period & Religion II 04.03.019 Master’s Thesis

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0            

04.03 Religious Philosophy Doctoral Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Master’s Core Courses

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 59 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters   

Master’s Degree 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 04.03.013 Early Modern Philosophical Period & Religion I 04.03.014 Early Modern Philosophical Period & Religion II 04.03.015 Later Modern & Postmodern Period & Religion I 04.03.016 Late Modern & Postmodern Period & Religion II 04.03.017 Late Modern & Postmodern Period & Religion III 04.03.021 Religious Philosophy Dissertation

04.04 Mysticism & Contemplative Studies Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 04.04.001 Introduction to Mysticism I 04.04.002 Introduction to Mysticism II 04.04.003 Mystical Theology I 04.04.004 Mystical Theology II 04.04.017 Mysticism & Community 04.04.019 Thomas Merton: The Model for the Contemplative Life I

 

  

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0       

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

04.04.020 Thomas Merton: The Model for the Contemplative Life II 04.04.022 A Contemplative Life I 04.04.022 A Contemplative Life II 04.04.023 A Contemplative Life III 04.04.024 A Contemplative Life IV 04.04.035 Master’s Thesis

69

     

05.02 Ecotheology Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 05.02.001 Introduction to Ecotheology I 05.02.002 Introduction to Ecotheology II 05.02.003 Creaturely Theology 05.02.004 Animal Theology I 05.02.005 Animal Theology II 05.02.006 Animal Theology III 05.02.007 Animal Theology IV 05.02.008 Logical Coherency, Theodicy, & Ecotheology 05.01.002 The Way of the Earth: Microcosm I 05.01.003 The Way of the Earth Macrocosm II 05.01.009 Understanding Global Climate Change & Ecosystem Destruction 05.02.016 Master’s Thesis

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0            

05.02 Ecotheology Doctoral Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Master’s Core Courses

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 59 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters 

Master’s Degree 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 05.02.017 Ecotheology Dissertation

05.03 Religious Naturalism Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 05.03.001 Religious Naturalism: Definitions & Counterpoints I 05.03.002 Religious Naturalism: Definitions & Counterpoints II 05.03.003 Religious Naturalism: Definitions & Counterpoints III 05.03.004 Religious Naturalism: Definitions & Counterpoints IV 05.03.005 Toward and Atheology of Religious Naturalism I 05.03.005 Toward and Atheology of Religious Naturalism II

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0       

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

05.03.005 Toward and Atheology of Religious Naturalism III 05.03.008 Place I 05.03.009 Place II 05.01.002 The Way of the Earth: Microcosm I 05.01.003 The Way of the Earth Macrocosm II 05.01.009 Understanding Global Climate Change & Ecosystem Destruction 05.03.020 Master’s Thesis

05.03 Religious Naturalism Doctoral Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Master’s Core Courses

70

      

05.03.021 Religious Naturalism Dissertation

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 59 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters 

05.04 Ecosophy & Environmental Philosophy Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 05.04.001 Introduction to Environmental Philosophy 05.04.002 Ecofeminism I 05.04.004 Deep Ecology & Ecosophy I 05.04.009 Environmental Ethics I 05.04.010 Environmental Ethics II 05.04.011 Environmental Ethics III 05.03.020 Master’s Thesis

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0        

06.01 Ecopsychology Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 06.01.001 Ecopsychology Frameworks & Paradigms I 06.01.002 Ecopsychology Frameworks & Paradigms II 06.01.003 Ecopsychology Frameworks & Paradigms III 06.01.004 Ecopsychology Frameworks & Paradigms IV 06.01.005 Ecopsychology Frameworks & Paradigms V 06.01.006 Ecopsychology Frameworks & Paradigms VI 06.01.007 Ecotherapy 06.01.009 Nature, Experience, Kinship & Identity I 06.01.010 Nature, Experience, Kinship & Identity II 06.01.011 Nature, Experience, Kinship & Identity III 06.01.012 Nature, Experience, Kinship & Identity IV 06.01.017 Ecopsychology Master’s Thesis

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0             

Master’s Degree 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

06.01 Ecopsychology

Doctoral Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Master’s Core Courses Master’s Degree 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 06.01.018 Ecopsychology Dissertation 05.04.005 Deep Ecology & Ecosophy I 05.04.009 Environmental Ethics I 06.01.013 Nature Deficit Disorder: Restoring Children’s Connection to Nature 06.02.001 Foundations in Counseling 06.02.002 Counseling Theories 06.02.003 The Self-Reflective Counselor 06.02.004 Assessment 06.02.008 Crisis Assessment & Counseling 06.02.011 Boundaries, Ethics, and Professional Practice 06.02.006 Techniques of Pastoral Counseling I 06.02.007 Techniques of Pastoral Counseling II 06.01.019 Ecopsychology Practicum

06.02 Pastoral Counseling & Care Professional Certification Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Master’s Degree 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 06.02.001 Foundations in Counseling 06.02.002 Counseling Theories 06.02.003 The Self-Reflective Counselor 06.02.004 Assessment 06.02.005 Psychology of Religion 06.02.006 Techniques of Pastoral Counseling I 06.02.007 Techniques of Pastoral Counseling II 06.02.008 Crisis Assessment & Counseling 06.02.009 Pastoral Counseling Across the Lifespan 06.02.010 Group Process & Pastoral Counseling 06.02.011 Boundaries, Ethics, and Professional Practice 06.02.016 Pastoral Counseling Practicum

07.01 Spiritual & Religious Arts

71

Applied Program, if pursuing state counseling licensure please talk with Dr. Batten  YES 62 3.0 Required if no prior experience Required Required if not taken at Masters             

Track 1: Scholarship  Required for Entrance 59 3.0 Required for Entrance Required if not taken at Masters            

Applied

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

Masters of Fine Arts Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 07.01.001 Introduction to Religion, Spirituality, and Creativity Final Thesis Project

72

 NO 80 3.0   

08.01 Compassionate Lifestyle Couch & Careworker Professional Certification Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Length of Time to Complete 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 08.01.001 Twelve Steps Toward a Compassionate Life 08.01.002 Pathways to Peace I 08.01.003 Pathways to Peace II 08.01.004 Letting Go, Letting Be, Being Still I 08.01.005 Letting Go, Letting Be, Being Still II 03.01.013 Models of Forgiveness & Reconciliation 03.01.014 Perspectives & Practice of Living Kindness 06.02.001 Foundations in Counseling 08.01.006 Letting Go, Letting Be, Being Still III 08.01.007 Creating Simplicity 08.01.008 Embracing Wabi-Sabi: The Value of Imperfection 08.01.009 Compassionate Assessment 08.01.010 Supporting Change 08.01.011 Practicum

Applied  NO 68 3.0 2 years Year 1 Year 1 Year 1 Year 1 Year 1 Year 1 Year 1 Year 1 Year 2 Year 2 Year 2 Year 2

08.02 A Course in Miracles Teacher Certification Ordination Required Credits Required GPA Length of Time to Complete 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 08.02.001 A Course in Miracles 08.02.002 Readings in Miracle Studies 08.02.003 Teacher Strategies 08.02.004 Teacher Practicum

Applied  NO 68 3.0 2 years Year 1 Year 1 Year 2 Year 2 Year 2

08.03 Contemporary Spiritualities Master’s Degree Ordination Required Credits Required GPA 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred 08.03.001 Introduction to Contemporary Spirituality 08.03.002 Reading Wayne Dyer 08.03.003 Reading Eckharte Tolle 08.03.004 Reading Doreen Virtue 08.03.005 Reading Marianne Williams 08.03 Master’s Thesis

Year 2 Year 2 Year 2

Track 1: Scholarship  NO 58 3.0       

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

73

OSC Course Descriptions Courses and textbooks subject to change; do not purchase textbooks until the course has been announced and made official. Course numbers may change and not match with degree course listing, please select courses by course title. Please remember not all courses are offered each semester; please see your Course Bulletin to select courses.

01.01 World Shamanism 01.01.001 History of Shamanism in Human Culture (3 Credits) This course examines the history of shamanism as a constellation of religious and cultural practices both past and present from an interdisciplinary perspective (religious, anthropologic, psychological, and sociological). Text: Supplied 01.01.002 The Anthropology of Shamanism (3 Credits) This course examines common themes between shamanic traditions and practices, as well as looks at the specific and unique cultural contexts that separate traditions. Text: Shamanism by Mircea Eliade (Optional) The Beauty of the Primitive: Shamanism and Western Imagination by Andrei A. Znamensko 01.01.003 A Survey of Neoshamanic Traditions (3 Credits) This course looks at current perspectives on shamanistic religious structures and experiences. Text: Travelling Between the Worlds by Hillary S. Webb 01.01.004 Shamanism in Psychology (3 Credits) Readings exploring the psychological and cultural aspects of the shamanic experience will be explored. Texts: Healing States by Alberto Villodo & Stanley Krippner; Wondrous Healing by James McClenon; Green Psychology by Ralph Metzner 01.01.005 Shamanic Ecstasy & Journeying (3 Credits) Readings exploring the relationship between shamanic journeying and ecstatic religions will be explored. Text: Ecstatic Religion: A Study of Shamanism & Spirit Possession by IM Lewis; Awakening to the Spirit World: The Shamanic Path of Direct Revelation by Sandra Ingerman & Hank Wesselman. Additional readings supplied 01.01.006 The Shaman (3 Credits) This course will look at how the shaman becomes a character with a specific narrative/biographical history. We’ll specifically look at the role of the shaman and the shamanic calling within fictionalized or pseudo-biographical texts. Texts: The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge by Carlos Castaneda; Medicine Woman by Lynn V. Andrews. Additional readings supplied 01.01.007 Shamanism & Native American Culture (3 Credits) This work will explore the diverse tribal beliefs of Native American culture and their relationship to informing contemporary shamanism as well as explore the issue of Western usurpation of Native American traditions and the current drive to separate ethnic traditions from New Age practices. Text: The

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

74

Religions of American Indians by Ake Hultkrantz & Monica Setterwell; (Optional Shamanic Healing & Ritual Drama by Ake Hultkrantz). Additional readings supplied 01.01.008 Teutonic–Germanic Shamanism (3 Credits) This course will explore Teutonic European traditions of Neoshamanism. Text: Nine Worlds of Seid-Magic: Ecstasy and Neoshamanism in North European Paganism by Jenny Blain; The Well of Remembrance by Ralph Metzner 01.01.009 Mongolian Shamanism (3 Credits) This course will explore the unique history and present-day practice of Shamanism in Mongolia. Text: Riding Windhorses: A Journey into the Heart of Mongolian Shamanism by Sarangerel; Chosen by the Spirits: Following Your Shamanic Calling by Sarangerel 01.01.010 Siberian Shamanism (3 Credits) This course will explore the unique history of shamanism and the last vestiges of its practice in the Arctic Circle of Siberia. Text: The Last of the Shor Shamans by Alexander Arbachakov; The Shamans Coat: A Native History of Siberia by Anna Reid 01.01.011 African Shamanic Traditions (3 Credits) This course will explore Afro-centric Shamanic traditions, both within the contemporary and arcane context. Texts: Of Water and the Spirit: Ritual, Magic, and Initiation in the Life of an African Shaman by Malidoma Some; Finding Soul on the Path of Orisa: A West African Spiritual Tradition by Tobe Melora Correal; The Way of the Elders: West African Spirituality & Tradition by Adama Doumbia 01.01.012 Asiatic Shamanic Traditions (3 Credits) This course will explore shamanic traditions within Asiatic regions, including Korea, Japan, and Tibet. Texts: Shamanism: The Spirit World of Korea by Richard WI Guisso; The Catalpa Bow: A Study of Shamanistic Practices in Japan by Carmen Blacker (pricy buy older editions used); Shamanism and Tantra in the Himalayas by Surendra Bahadur Shahi, Claudia Mueller-Ebeling, & Christian Ratsch (Optional) 01.01.013 Celtic Shamanic Practices (3 Credits) This course will explore Celtic Shamanic traditions, including an examination of contemporary neoshamanic paths. Texts: Advanced Celtic Shamanism by DJ Conway; Fire in the Head by Tom Cowan; Mist-filled Path by Tom Cowan 01.01.014 Introduction to Druidism (3 Credits) This course will introduce the student to basic principles and practices of Druidism in contemporary Western culture. Texts: A Brief History of the Druids by Peter Ellis; Blood and Mistletoe: A History of the Druids in England by Ronald Hutton; The Druidry Handbook by John Michael Greer 01.01.015 Voodoo & Afro-Caribbean Traditions This course will introduce the student to the history and practice of Afro-Caribbean traditions in the United States and Caribbean. Texts: The Handbook of Yoruba Religious Concepts by Baba Ifa Karade; Sacred Possessions : Vodou, Santeria, Obeah, and the Caribbean by Margarite Fernandez Olmos; Vodou Shaman: The Haitian Way of Healing & Power by Ross Heaven

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

75

01.01.016 Polynesian Shamanism: Huna (3 Credits) This course will explore the Hawaiian tradition of Huna. Texts: The Sacred Power of Huna: Spirituality and Shamanism in Hawaii by Rima Morrell 01.01.017 Jewish Shamanism (3 Credits) This course explores the concept of Jewish shamanism. Texts: Magic of the Ordinary: Recovering the Shamanic in Judaism by Rabbi Gershon Winkler 01.01.018 Women in Shamanism (3 Credits) This course will look at the role of shamanism as a system of empowerment for women, as well as the historical role of the women shaman. Texts: The Woman in the Shaman’s Body: Reclaiming the Feminine Religion and Medicine by Barbara Tedlock; Shakti Woman: Feeling Our Fire, Healing Our World by Vicki Noble; Life and Times of a Korean Shaman: Of Tales and the Telling of Tales by Laurel Kendall 01.01.019 Hallucinogens in Shamanism (3 Credits) Critically examines the role of hallucinogens within global shamanic traditions. Text: Hallucinogens and Shamanism by Michael Harner 01.01.020 Readings of Neoshamanic Practitioners (3 Credits) This course series explores a wide range of contemporary neoshamanic practitioners ranging from Michael Harner, Sandra Ingerman, Miguel Ruiz, Patrice Malidoma Somé, etc. Text announced each semester 01.01.021 Ethics & Professional Practice for Shamanic Ministry Intensive (3 Credits) Open to students in World Shamanism ministerial tract or combined tract. This course will prepare students for professional practice and ensures best-practice approach with a firm ethical framework. Students registering for this course should contact Dr. Batten for further information. 01.01.022–23 Shamanic Counseling I & II (6 Credits) These courses are designed to prepare shamanic practitioners in general methods of shamanic-based counseling and interventions. Shamanic Counseling I is taken during ministerial/combined tract of the Masters; Shamanic Counseling II is only for doctoral students. Doctoral students who have not taken Shamanic Counseling I, will be required to take this course before enrolling in II. Prerequisite: 06.02.001 Foundations in Counseling. Texts: Shamanism: A Biopsychosocial Paradigm of Consciousness & Healing by Michael Winkleman; Letters to a Medicine Man by Barbara Kerr. 01.01.024-01.01.025 Shamanic Healing I & II (6 Credits) This course examines key elements of healing within the contemporary shamanic traditions. Texts: Course I Illumination: The Shamans Way of Healing by Alberto Villodo Soul Retrieval: Healing the Fragmented Self by Sandra Ingerman Course II Plant Spirit Medicine: The Healing Power of Plants by Eliot Cowan Plant Spirit Shamanism by Ross Heaven & Howard Charing 01.01.026 Elements of Ritual (3 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

76

Open only to doctoral students. This course is designed to facilitate the student in creating effective shamanic rituals for inclusion in their professional practice and skill-set. Texts: Sacred Ceremony: How to Create Ceremonies for Healing, Transitions, and Celebrations by Steven Farmer 01.01.027 Animals in Shamanism: Totems and Power Animals (3 Credits) Open only to doctoral students. This course is designed to facilitate the student in creating effective shamanic rituals for inclusion in their professional practice and skill-set. Texts: Animal Speak by Ted Andrews; Totems: The Transformative Power of Your Persona by Brand Steiger; New Paths to Animal Totems: Three Alternative Approaches to Creating Your Own Totemism by Lupa; Totem Magic: Dance of the Shapeshifter by Yasmine Galenorn 01.01.030 Independent Study in Shamanism (3-9 credits) Students may create their own course of study with the approval of the Dean; culminating in a cohesive final project. By permission only. 01.01.031 Defining Your Shamanic Tradition (3 Credit) This is a short fundamental course for students working on their dissertation that is based on a ministerial or combined path designed to create a fully organized shamanic tradition. By permission only. 01.01.032 Shamanic Practicum (10 Credits) Open to Masters and Doctoral students working within ministerial/combined tracts in World Shamanism who have completed their coursework or dissertation. Students who have successfully created their tradition will be asked to begin to apply their work professionally and utilizing real-world experiences and relationships develop their client interaction skills. No texts necessary. 01.01.033 Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) For students working within a combined or scholarship tract. Students are asked to pull together a comprehensive research project within the broad field of shamanism. By approval. Handbook provided. 01.01.034 Shamanic Dissertation (20 Credits) Open only to doctoral students in World Shamanism who have completed all prior coursework. Students craft a final research or tradition project demonstrating depth of knowledge of an area of shamanism. Handbook provided.

02 Department of Neopagan Studies

02.01 Neopagan Studies 02.01.001 Neopaganism in Contemporary Society (3 Credits) This course explores the development and diversification of Neopaganism in contemporary Western culture. Text provided: [Recommended: Between the Worlds: Readings in Contemporary Neopaganism by Sian Reid]; [Recommended: Enchanted Feminism: The Reclaiming Witches of San Francisco by Jone Salomonsen] 02.01.002 Neopagan Theology (3 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

77

This course broadly explores theological themes among diverse Neopagan traditions. Choose Either Text: The Deities are Many: A Polytheistic Theology by Jordan Paper (preferred); Pagan Theology: Paganism as World Religion by Michael York 02.01.003 Sociology of Neopaganism (3 Credits) This course examines the sociological contexts associated with contemporary Neopagan practices, with specific attention to identity theories. Text: Drawing Down the Moon by Margot Adler 02.01.004 Stigmatization of the Witch in History & Culture (3 Credits) This course will look at stigmatization of the “witch” in history and contemporary culture, with a specific look at social factors that created the climate of violence and suspicion that led to the European and American Witch Trials and genocide. Text: Witchcraze by Anne Barstow; The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe by Brian P. Levack; Additional reading supplied. 02.01.005 The Sacred Grove: Covens & Neopagan Groups (3 Credits) This course will look at the role of the coven and Neopagan religious groups, including establishing a coven, and issues specific to running and negotiating coven issues. Students are asked to complete a final coven project whereby they create a model for a coven. Text: Sacred Groves: Creating & Sustaining Neopagan Covens by Katherine MacDowell 02.01.006 Ethics & Professional Practice (3 Credits) This course will look at the ethical and professional issues associated with a Neopagan religious identity and practice and is required for both Goddess and Wicca Studies students. Text: Ethics & Professional Practice for Neopagan Clergy by Katherine MacDowell 02.01.007 Ritual & Liturgy for Neopagan Clergy (3 Credits) This course will look at developing ritual and liturgy for coven work that permits spontaneity and also purpose and identity. Required for both Goddess and Wicca students. Text provided. 02.01.008 Crisis of Faith & Inspiration (3 Credits) This course will look at strategies to help coven members experiencing crises of faith and stress cope and experience a greater sense of control and acceptance. Text: Spiritual Mentoring: A Pagan Guide by Judy Harrow; additional readings supplied. 02.01.009 Empowering Members: Coping with Stigma (3 Credits) This course will look at practical strategies to help coven members and oneself cope with stigma associated with a nontraditional religion. Texts: Pagans and the Law by Dana Eilers Stigma: How We Treat Outsiders by Gerhard Falk. 02.01.010 Principles and Practice of Magick (3 Credits) This course will look at the practice, principles and ethics of magick, including examining the different methods and selection of objects. Texts vary each semester. 02.01.013 Teaching & Caring for Children (3 Credits) This course looks at specific issues related to families and children, particularly issues associated with raising children within Neopagan traditions. Texts: Circle Round: Raising Children in Goddess Traditions by Starhawk, Anne Hill, Diane Baker; Growing Up Pagan: A Workbook for Wiccan Families by Raine Hill; [Recommended: The Elements of Witchcraft: Natural Magick for Teens by Ellen Dugan] [Recommended:

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

78

Celebrating the Great Mother: A Handbook for Earth-Honoring Activities for Parents & Children by Cait Johnson] 02.01.014 Crafting Rites for Neopagan Clergy (3 Credits) This course will look at developing hand-fasting rituals, infancy welcoming rituals, coming-of-age rituals, and other developmental milestones within the framework of diverse Neopagan traditions, with a specific emphasis on Goddess and Wiccan ministerial/combined masters-level paths. Prerequisite: 02.01.007 Ritual & Liturgy for Nepagan Clergy. Texts: Creating Circles and Ceremonies: Rituals for All Seasons and Reasons by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart; The Earth Path: Grounding Your Spirit in the Rhythms of Nature by Starhawk. [Recommended but not required Handfasting and Wedding Rituals: Welcoming Hera’s Blessing by Raven Kaldera and Tannin Schwartzstein. 02.01.015 Death & Dying (3 Credits) This course will look at providing comfort, counseling and rituals to address issues of death and dying within the framework of various Neopagan traditions. Text: Pagan Book of Living and Dying by Starhawk and M. Macha NightMare. 02.01.016 Neopagan 12-Step Addictions Treatment (3 Credits) Addictions treatment remains potently connected to religious and spiritual frameworks. In this course, we’ll look at how a 12-step program might look like in connection with diverse Neopagan paths and frameworks; course will also explore how to establish and foster a 12-step group that is Neopagan friendly. Text: The Recovery Spiral: A Pagan Path to Healing by Cynthia Jane Collins. Additional readings supplied. 02.01.017 The Role of the Priest and Priestess (3 Credits) This course will look at the role of the Priest and Priestess within Neopagan practice, with specific attention to pastoral care roles. Text provided. 02.01.018-02.01.020 Fostering Spirituality, Embracing Sexual Diversity & Identity Inclusion (9 Credits) This course specifically looks at spirituality from a framework within the Gay, Lesbian, and Transgendered community. Course I Coming out of Shame by Gershen Kaufmen and Lev Raphael Course II Gay Soul: Finding the Heart of Gay Spirit and Nature… by Mark Thompson Gay Spirit: Myth and Meaning by Mark Thompson Two Flutes Playing: A Spiritual Journeybook for Men by Andrew Ramer Course III Hermaphrodeities: The Transgender Spirituality Workbook by Raven Kaldera Lesbian Rites: Symbolic Acts and the Power of Community by Romona Faith Oswald

02.01.022 Master’s Thesis in Neopagan Theology (10 Credits) Students within the Neopagan Theology program are required to complete a thesis. Handbook provided. 02.02 Goddess Thealogy Feminist Theology courses may also be utilized to meet a degree in this area.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

79

02.02.001-02.02.002 Goddess Traditions in Contemporary Society I & II (6 Credits) This course looks at the rise of modern Goddess-based traditions within Western culture, with an emphasis on sociopolitical factors that facilitated the rediscovery of the Goddess and leading practitioners. Course I The Politics of Women’s Spirituality: Essays by Founding Mothers of the Movement by Charlene Spretnak Daughters of the Goddess by Wendy Griffin Course II Living in the Lap of the Goddess by Cynthia Eller 02.02.003 Historical Roots of Goddess Worship (3 Credits) This course looks at the archaeological and anthropological research of Goddess worship in pre-history and antiquity, competing theories will be explored. Text provided. 02.02.004 Introduction to Thealogy (3 Credits) This course will introduce students to a working framework thealogical framework—that is thinking about the Goddess. Text: Rebirth of the Goddess by Carol Christ Additional readings supplied 02.02.005 -02.02.007 Matriarchal Myth, Modern Reconstruction, & Grand Narrative (9 Credits) This course looks at how women have constructed a Goddess narrative. Course I The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering Religion of Earth by Monica Sjoo The Chalice and the Blade by Riane Eisler Course II When God Was a Woman by Merlin Stone The Living Goddess by Marija Gimbutas with Miriam Robbins Dexter Course III The Descent of Woman by Elaine Morgan The Faces of the Goddess by Lotte Motz The Myth of a Matriarchal Prehistory: Why an Invented Past Will Not Give Women a Future by Cynthia Eller [Optional: The Kurgan Culture and the Indo-Europeanization of Europe: Selected Articles from 1952 to 1992 by Marija Gimbutas (if avl)] 02.02.008 Goddess Archetype: A Psychodynamic Perspective (3 Credits) This course will look at the vision of the Goddess as archetype within psychodynamic literature. In this capacity, we will be looking at how the faces and narratives of the Goddess act as ways of understanding female psychology, as well as deflecting women an opportunity to find a spiritual mirror and power. Texts: Goddesses in Everywoman by Jean Shinoda Bolen; The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious by CG Jung [Optional: What Story Are You Living? by Carol Pearson and Hugh Marr] [Optional: Goddesses in Older Women: Archetypes for Women Over Fifty and Artemis: The Indomitable Spirit in Every Woman by Jean Shinoda Bolen] Additional readings supplied. 02.02.009 Goddess Mothers (3 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

80

The subject of this course will vary from semester to semester and explore key leaders within the establishment of actual goddess-based communities and religious groups. Featured mothers include: Shekhinah Mountainwater, Z Budapest, Phyllis Curott, Carol Christ, Patricia Monaghan, etc. Texts required, but will vary semester to semester. 02.02.010 The White Goddess (3 Credits) This course will critically examine Robert Graves’ The White Goddess, which is generally thought of as the founding text that reintroduced the Goddess to modernity. Text: The White Goddess by Robert Graves 02.02.011 Birth–Death–Regeneration: The Triple Goddess Intensive (3 Credits) This course will explore in-depth the guiding themes of Goddess tradition associated with the image of the Triple Goddess. It will look at both the thealogical implications and personal application in daily life. Text provided. 02.02.012 The Goddess Wheel of the Year (3 Credits) This will look at the traditional Pagan holidays and how they are reframed within the Goddess path, as well as look at significant holidays for goddess worship during the year to facilitate the development of a personal sacred year. Text: Goddess Wheel of the Year by Katherine MacDowell [Optional: Women’s Wheel of Life by Elizabeth Davis and Carol Leonard (if avl)] 02.02.013 Goddess Ritual Theory (3 Credits) This course will look at ritual structure within goddess worship, tools, and consecration of tools. Prerequisite: 02.01.007 Creating Ritual and Liturgy Intensive Text: To Make and Make Again: Feminist Ritual Thealogy by Charlotte Caron 02.02.014 Thealogy and Deasophy (3 Credits) This course will deepen discussions from its prerequisite 02.02.003 Introduction to Thealogy. Text: Thealogy and Embodiment by Melissa Raphael; [Recommended: Introducing Thealogy: Discourses on the Goddess by Melissa Raphael (if avl) [Recommended: Goddess as Nature by Paul Reid-Bowen (if affordable to you)] 02.02.015-02.02.016 Advanced Thealogical Praxis I & II (3 Credits Each) This is a course designed for students within the ministerial or combined tract and examines advanced topics in ritual practice within Goddesswork. Prerequisite: 02.02.011 Goddess Ritual Theory. Course I Walking an Ancient Path: Rebirthing the Goddess on Planet Earth by Karen Tate The Holy Book of Women’s Mysteries by Z Budapest Women’s Rites, Women’s Mysteries: Creating Ritual in the Dianic Wiccan Tradition by Ruth Barrett Course II Sacred Woman, Sacred Dance: Awakening Spirituality Through Movement & Ritual by Iris Stewart The Body Sacred by Dianne Sylvan [Recommended: I Am Woman By Rite by Nancy Brady Cunningham (if avl)] [Recommended: Celebrating Ourselves: A Crone Ritual Book by Edna M. Ward (if avl)] 02.02.017 High Priestess (3 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

81

This course will look at the specific role and function of the High Priestess within the coven. Text: Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece by Joan Breton Connelly; Priestess: Woman as Sacred Celebrant by Pamela Eakins [Recommended: In Search of the Priestess: Female Leadership in Alternative Spiritualities by Joanne Pearson (if avl. & affordable)] 02.02.018 Independent Goddess Study (3-9 Credits) Students may opt to develop a specific research/area of study that culminates in a final paper/project and requires their investment in research and/or practice. By approval. 02.02.019 Goddess Priestess Practicum (10 Credits) Students seeking ordination must successfully complete a 6-month internship at leading rituals and providing pastoral care and mentorship. Handbook provided. 02.02.020 Goddess Thesis (10 Credits) Students working in the scholar/combined path are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided 02.02.021 Goddess Thealogy Dissertation (20 Credits) Students in the doctoral program must complete a dissertation. Handbook provided

02.03 Wicca 02.03.001 Historical Roots of Wicca (3 Credits) This course will look at various theories of the origin and emergence of Wicca through history and current traditions within contemporary society. Text: Triumph of the Moon: History of Modern Pagan Witchcraft by Ronald Hutton 02.03.002 Foundational Thinkers (3 Credits) This course changes each semester to explore a critical work or practitioner in Wicca/Witchcraft traditions. Authors to be explored include: Gerald Gardner and Doreen Valiente, Starhawk, Scott Cunningham, Ann Moura, Laurie Cabot, Ted Andrews, and many more. 02.03.003 Philosophical Themes of Wicca (3 Credits) This course will look at the connecting religious and philosophical themes of Wicca. Text: The Philosophy of Wicca by Amber Laine Fisher (if avl.) 02.03.004 The God & Symbols (3 Credits) This course will look at the role of the God in Wicca and the associated symbols within religious practice. Text provided. 02.03.005 The Goddess & Symbols (3 Credits) This course will look at the role of the Goddess in Wicca and the associated symbols within religious practice. Text provided. 02.03.006 Philosophical Concepts in Wicca (3 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

82

This course explores in-depth the philosophical implications of the “Witch’s Pyramid” in the spiritual philosophy of Wicca to personal practice and wider religious structure and the “Wiccan Rede.” Text provided. 02.03.007 (I) The Charge of the Goddess Intensive (3 Credits) This course will explore in-depth the commonly utilized liturgy “Charge of the Goddess” and its use in personal practice and its religious and philosophical implications. Text provided. 02.03.008 The Charge of the God Intensive (3 Credits) This course will explore in-depth the less commonly used liturgy “Charge of the God” and its implications in personal practice and in the philosophical identity of Wicca. Text provided. 02.03.009 Introduction to Wicca Ritual (3 Credits) This course will look at the symbolic and religious meaning of Wicca ritual structure and tools and explore the practical use of each as well as the overall structure of ritual. Texts: Elements of Ritual by Deborah Lipp 02.03.010–02.03.011 Sabbats I & II (6 Credits) This course will explore in-depth the historical, symbolic and philosophical meanings of all eight Sabbats in Wicca. Course follows a full-year cycle to carry students through all 8 celebrations. Students attend online worship services and also craft their own celebrations. Texts: Sabbats: A Witch’s Approach to Living the Old Ways by Edain McCoy A Year of Ritual: Sabbats & Esbats for Solitaries and Covens by Sandra Kyne Sabbatt Entertaining: Celebrating the Wiccan Holidays with Style by Willow Polson 02.03.012 Esbats (3 Credits) This course explores the role of Moon celebrations within Wicca; students attend at least 2 online Esbats during the semester of study and also are provided with practical experience in crafting Esbat rituals. Texts: Grandmother Moon: Lunar Magic in Our Lives by Z Budapest Moon Lore: Lunar Tales of Wisdom and Magic by Elizabeth Pepper Llewellyn’s Magical Almanac (year appropriate) [Recommended: Year of Moons, Seasons of Trees by Pattalee Glass-Koentop (if avl)] Additional readings supplied. 02.03.013 Wiccan Traditions (3 Credits) Courses in this subject vary from semester-to-semester and focus on critical traditions that have developed within Wicca, their major philosophical themes, and present-day activities. Including: the Alexandrian and Gardnerian Traditions in Wicca; Celtic and Faery Wicca; Seax and Asatru; Green, Kitchen, and Pictish; and Strega. 02.03.014 Introduction to GreenCraft (3 Credits) In this course you will learn how to walk the path of the green witch, working in harmony with nature. as well as how to create sacred spaces that will help you make your home a protected, powerful place. Text: The Way of the Green Witch by Arin Murphy-Hisco*ck 02.01.015 Introduction to HedgeCraft

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

83

In this course you will learn how to walk the path of the hedge witch, working in harmony with nature as well as how to create sacred spaces that will help you make your home a protected, powerful place. Text: The Way of the Hedge Witch by Arin Murphy-Hisco*ck 02.03.016 Crafting One’s Craft (3 Credits) Individuals will develop their own personal definition of the Craft and elements of tradition. This specific course will look at the process of creating and function of a Book of Shadows. Text: Your Book of Shadows by Patricia Telesco 02.03.017 Independent Study (3-9 Credits) Students working in this degree program may select an independent project to explore and research, culminating in a substantial final project or paper. Registration by permission. 02.03.018 Wicca Priest/ess Practicum (10 Credits) Students seeking ordination must successfully complete a 6-month internship at leading rituals and providing pastoral care and mentorship. Handbook provided. 02.03.019 Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students within the master’s scholarship/combined path must complete a thesis. Handbook provided. 02.03.020 Dissertation (20 Credits) Students within the doctoral program must complete a dissertation. Handbook provided. 02.04 Divination Note: Only 1 divination course may be counted as an elective toward a degreed program. The bulk of your courses in a degreed program must come from elsewhere. 02.04.001 Foundations in Divination: The Purpose, Function, & Systems of Divination Intensive (3 Credits) This course will explore various types of divination systems. Text provided. 02.04.003-02.04.005 The I-Ching Mastery (9 Credits) Year-long course introduces and provides students opportunity to practice and begin to the master the IChing. Texts for all courses: The I-Ching translated by Wilhelm/Baynes The Complete I-Ching: Definitive Translation by Master Huang Traditional YARROW sticks—no COINS [Recommended: The I-Ching Workbook by RL Wing (if avl)] Additional readings supplied. 02.04.006-02.04.008 Runes Mastery (9 Credits) Takes a year-and-a-half to complete course. The first aspect of this course introduces students to a Norse grounded-interpretation of the three Aetts of the Elder Futhark: Freyr’s Aett, Hagal’s Aett, and Tyr’s Aett. Students learn myth, linguistic, and psychological meanings of each rune within each Aett. As students complete their first level of study they move into the divination level of work that allows them to actively read for others and themselves. The final element of the year is examining the runes within their magical

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

84

context. Text provided (students may additionally utilize external texts as they see fit). Elder Futhark rune set is required. 02.04.009-02.04.0011 Numerology Mastery (9 Credits) Takes a year-and-a-half to complete course. First course, introduces students to the basic fundamentals of numerology and its place in the modern era. The second course introduces how to do numerology through three mainstay texts. The final course looks at specific ways to apply numerology to specific issues. Students have an opportunity to practice their skills within the course. Course I Numerology for the New Age by Lynn Buess Course II The Complete Book of Numerology by David Phillips Numerology, the Complete Guide Volumes I and II by Matthew Goodwin Course III Numerology for Healing: Your Personal Numbers as the Key to Healthier Life by Michael Brill Numerology and the Divine Triangle by Faith Javane Numerology: The Romance in Your Name by Juno Jordan 02.04.012-02.04.020 Astrology Mastery (27 Credits) This is a three-year intense training program. The first course introduces students to the history and context of astrology, as well as provide students with key references. The second course is designed to provide students with direct instruction on how to do astrology as a mode of birth chart creation and horoscope creation. The third thru sixth courses look at advanced interpretative topics of specific aspects of the chart. The seventh looks at critical texts on broader issues related to astrology and the final two courses introduce students to Eastern astrological methods and functions. Course I Astrologer’s Handbook by Sakoian & Acker The Contemporary Astrologer’s Handbook by Sue Tompkins The Story of Astrology by Manly Palmer Hall Cosmos and the Psyche by Richard Tarnas Course II The Only Way to Learn Astrology Volumes 2-3 by Marion D. March and Joan McEvers Course III Planets in Houses by Pelletier The Twelve Houses by Sasportas Planets in Transit by Hand Course IV Aspects in Astrology by Sue Tompkins Aspects and Personality by Karen Hamaker-Zondag Aspects: A New Approach to Understanding the Planetary Relationships by Robin Antepara Aspect Patterns: What They Reveal & How They are Triggered by Stephanie Clement Course V Lunar Nodes: Discover Your Souls Karmic Mission by Celeste Teal North Node Astrology by Elizabeth Spring Midpoints by Don McBroom Course VI Saturn: A New Look at an Old Planet by Liz Greene The Luminaries: The Psychology of the Sun and Moon in Horoscope by Liz Greene

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

Saturn in Transit by Erin Sullivan Chiron: The Bridge Between the Inner and Outer Planets by Barbara Hand Clow Course VII The Knot of Time: Astrology and Female Experience by Lindsay River & Sally Gillespie Astrology, Karma, & Transformation by Stephen Arroyo Planets in Composite by Robert Hand Relating by Liz Greene Course VIII Light on Life: An Introduction to the Astrology of India by Hart de Fouw & Robert Scoboda Fundamentals of Vedic Astrology: Vedic Astrology Handbook Volume I by Bepin Behari Course IX Fundamentals of Vedic Astrology: Vedic Astrology Handbook Volume II by Bepin Behari Taoist Astrology: A Handbook of the Authentic Chinese Tradition by Susan Levitt & Jean Tank 02.04.021-02.04.027 Tarot Mastery (18 Credits) Each of these courses addresses specific issues with learning to utilize Tarot. Courses must be taken in order. Students are recommended to have a Rider-Waite tarot deck, but may utilize any deck they feel comfortable with. The first course looks at history and introduces students to the basics of tarot. The second thru fourth courses look at richer interpretative contexts and introduce the function of reading and creating spreads. Course five extends the interpretative learning to one self and for others for personal growth. Course six looks at a richer implication for the tarot as an actual psychological tool and will additionally address business issues. Course I A Cultural History of the Tarot: From Entertainment to Esotericism (if affordable) The Tarot: History, Symbolism, & Divination by Robert Place Absolute Beginner’s Guide to the Tarot by Mark Elroy Course II Understanding the Tarot Court by Mary K. Greer Tarot Decoded: Understanding and Using Dignities & Correspondences by Elizabeth Hazel Course III The Complete Book of Tarot Reversals by Mary K. Greer Learning Tarot Spreads by Joan Bunning Course IV Seventy-Eight Degrees of Wisdom by Rachel Pollack 21 Ways to Read a Tarot Card by Mary K. Greer Course V Tarot for Yourself: A Workbook of Personal Transformation by Mary K. Greer Tarot for Life: Reading the Cards for Everyday Guidance & Growth by Rachel Pollack Course VI Tarot and Psychology: Spectrum of Possibilities by Arthur Rosengarten [Recommended: Professional Tarot: The Business of Reading & Consulting by Christine Jette (if avl)] 02.04.028 (S) Pendulum Work Seminar (1 Credit) This course explores the use of the pendulum within divination work through a short live seminar. Students must have a pendulum. 02.04.029 Special Topics in Divination (3 Credits)

85

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

86

The topics of this course will vary from semester to semester and may include discussions on history, application, business, or new methodologies. 02.04.030 Divination Practicum (10 Credits) Students who have completed their coursework for a mastery in one area may register to begin their practicum. These are supervised, mentored programs whereby the student works directly with the public.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

87

03 Department of Traditional Religions 03.01 Foundational & Interreligious Courses 03.01.001 Religion in Prehistory (3 Credits) This course will look at religion and theories within early archaeology record prior to historical documentation. Text provided. 03.01.002 The Study of Religion (3 Credits) This course introduces students to the study of religion and major theories of religion. Texts: Studying Religion: An Introduction through Case Studies by Gary E Kessler Eight Theories of Religion by Daniel L. Pals Additional readings supplied. 03.01.003 Comparative Religious Studies (3 Credits) This course will introduce students to the major religious traditions worldwide and the process of examining them in relation to each other. Texts: The World’s Religions by Huston Smith Spirituality and World Religions: A Comparative Introduction by George E Saint-Laurent (pricey, but older, used editions affordable) Additional readings supplied. 03.01.004 The Sociology of Religion (3 Credits) This course will look at world religions from their social/contextual perspectives and theories. Text: The Sociology of Religion (2nd Ed) by Malcolm Hamilton (older editions are fine) Additional readings supplied. 03.01.005 The Psychology of Religion (3 Credits) This course will look at psychological perspectives in religion and spirituality, including neurological, psychodynamic, and cognitive views. Text Varieties of Religious Experience by William James Psychology of Religion: A Short Introduction by Kate Loewenthal [Recommended: Handbook of the Psychology of Religion by Paloutzin & Park (this is pricey)] Additional readings provided 03.01.006 Introduction to Theology: A Global Perspective (3 Credits) In this course students are introduced to the subject of theology through a global context rather than through a traditional Christian one. Text: Introducing Theologies of World Religions by Paul F. Kittner Comparative Theology: Deep Learning Across Religious Borders by Francis X. Clooney Essential Theological Terms by Justo Gonzalez Additional readings supplied.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

88

03.01.007 Science and Religion: Intersections & Debates (3 Credits) This course examines the complex relationship between Western scientific tradition and religion, including exploration of historical and contemporary issues of conflict. Texts: Science and Religion by Gary Ferngren Religion and Science by Bertrand Russell Contemplative Science: Where Buddhism and Neuroscience Converge by B. Alan Wallace Additional readings supplied 03.01.008 The Human Condition & World Religions (3 Credits) This course looks comparatively at multiple religions’ views of the human condition and the experience of suffering. Text: Problems of Suffering in Religions of the World by John Bowker The Human Condition by Robert Cummings Neville Additional readings supplied 03.01.009 The Afterlife: Religious Perspectives on Death & Dying (3 Credits) This course looks at how the major religions and individuals conceptualize dying, death, and the afterlife. Texts: Death and the Afterlife: Perspectives of World Religions by Hiroshi Obayashi Beyond the Threshold: Afterlife Beliefs and Experiences in World Religions by Christopher Moreman Additional readings supplied 03.01.010 Religion, Morality and Justice (3 Credits) This course explores the architecture of morality within religions and examines whether religion is a viable source for social justice. Texts: Religion and Morality by William J. Wainwright Living Faith: How Faith Inspires Social Justice by Curtiss Paul DeYong Additional readings supplied 03.01.011-03.01.012 Religion and War I & II (6 Credits) This is a complex course that will explore the role of religion in war/genocide and diverse views of war held by religions; as well as the role of religion in meaning-making after violence. Texts: Course I War and Peace in World Religions by Perry Schmidt-Leukal The Gods of War: Is Religion the Primary Cause of Violent Conflict by Meic Pearse Course II Religion, Violence, Memory, and Place by Oren Stier and J. Shawn Landres Ghandi’s Hope: Learning from World Religions as a Path to Peace by Jay McDaniel Additional readings supplied 03.01.013 Models of Forgiveness & Reconciliation (3 Credits) This course looks at the role of forgiveness through diverse religions to create a comprehensive model. Texts: Exclusion & Embrace: A Theological Exploration of Identity, Otherness, and Reconciliation by Miroslav Volf The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness by Simon Wiesenthal

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

89

The Wisdom of Forgiveness by the Dalai Lama Additional readings supplied 03.01.014 Perspectives & Practice of Loving Kindness: Love of Others , Loved by Divinity (3 Credits) This course will explore the universal theme of Loving Kindness as it manifests within scriptures, practice, and philosophy. Texts: Practice of Loving Kindness: A Guide to Spiritual Fulfillment and Social Harmony by Vincent Ruggiero The Sacred Art of Lovingkindness: Preparing to Practice by Rami Shapiro Grace in a Tree Stump: Old Testament Stories of God’s Love by J. Ellsworth Kalas Additional readings supplied 03.01.015 Sexual Identity and Religion (3 Credits) This course will critically examine aspects of stigmatization associated with sexual orientation within major religions and the spiritual lives of the LBGT community. Texts: Reclaiming the Spirit: Gay Men and Lesbians Come to Terms with Their Religion by David Shallenberger Gay Perspectives: Things Our hom*osexuality Tells Us About the Nature of God and the Universe by Toby Johnson Heterosexism in Contemporary World Religions: Problem and Prospect by Marvin Ellison 03.01.016 Faith Development in Context (3 Credits) This course looks at how individual’s faith develops over the course of their life within a contextualized model of human development. Texts: Human Development and Faith: Life-Cycle Stages of Body, Mind, and Soul by Felicity Kelcourse Stages of Faith: The Psychology of Human Development by James Fowler Additional readings supplied 03.01.017 Spirituality and Aging (3 Credits) This course explores spirituality and religion as individual’s age and implications for ministry. Texts: Aging, Spirituality & Religion: A Handbook (Volumes I & II) by Kimble, McFadden, & Ellor 03.01.018 Nurturing Spirituality & Teaching Religion in Childhood & Adolescence (3 Credits) This course looks at practical ways for religious professionals to support the spiritual growth of their younger members. Texts: Teaching Religious Education: Primary and Early Years by Elaine McCreery Nurturing Child and Adolescent Spirituality: Perspectives from the World’s Religious Traditions by Aostra Johnson [Recommended: Starbright: Meditations for Children by Maureen Garth] [Recommended: Sensational Meditation for Children by Sarah Wood Valley] [Recommended: Nurturing Spirituality in Children: Simple Hands-on Activities by Peggy Jo Jenkins] [Recommended: The Soul of Adolescence: In Their Own Words by Patricia Lyons] 03.01.019-03.01.020 Interreligious: A Religion of Integration (6 Credits) This course looks at interreligious spirituality and the growing presence of interfaith communities. Course I

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

90

Oneness: Great Principles Shared by All Religions by Jeffrey Moses Emerging Heart: Global Spirituality and the Sacred by Beverly Lanzetta Interactive Faith: The Essential Interreligious Community-Building Handbook by Hekman & Neiss Course II Spirituality: A Postmodern and Interfaith Approach to Cultivating a Relationship with God by Carl McColman Claiming the Earth as Common Ground: The Ecological Crisis through the Lens of Faith by Andrea CohenKeiner 03.01.021 Theosophies & Ethics of Interreligious Spirituality (3 Credits) This course looks at the underlying theosophical and theological architecture of interspirituality. Texts: Sourcebook of World’s Religions: An Interfaith Guide to Religion & Spirituality by Joel Beverslius The Otherside of Nothingness: Toward of Theology of Radical Openness by Beverly Lanzetta Transformation by Integration by Perry Schmidt-Leukel 03.01.022 Interspiritual Narratives (3 Credits) This course looks at the experiences of individuals cultivating an interspiritual life and acting as a model for interfaith ministerial work. Texts: Awakening the Spirit, Inspiring the Soul by Wayne Teasdale et al. Interfaith Dialogue and Peacebuilding by David Smock Hearing the Call Across Traditions: Readings on Faith and Service by Adam Davis Additional readings supplied. 03.01.023–03.01.024 Interreligious Homiletics (6 Credits) This course is designed for students working on an interreligious ministerial/combined tract; during the course students learn how to craft inspiring and effective interreligious sermons. Course I Thematic Preaching: An Introduction by Jane Rzepka and Ken Sawyer Preaching Parables: A Metaphorical Interfaith Approach by Steven Voris Course II For Praying Out Loud: Interfaith Prayers for Public Occasions by L. Annie Foerster Additional readings supplied. 03.01.025 Interreligious Counseling (3 Credits) This course is designed for students in the ministerial/combined interreligious studies path to provide them necessary skills to mentor and aid their religiously diverse community. Text: Noticing the Divine: An Introduction to Interfaith Spiritual Guidance by John Mabry Additional readings supplied. 03.01.026–03.01.027 Interreligious Liturgy (6 Credits) This course is designed for students in the ministerial/combined interreligious studies path in developing competency in creating interreligious rituals for key events in parishioner’s lives, including birth, marriage, and funeral rites. Texts: Joining Hands and Hearts: Interfaith, Intercultural Wedding Celebrations by Susanna Macomb Feast of the Universe: An Interfaith Sourcebook of Ecological Spirituality from the World’s Cultures and Religions by Anne Rowthorn

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

91

Routledge Encyclopedia of Religious Rites, Rituals, and Festivals by Frank Salamone Additional readings supplied 03.01.028 Interreligious Independent Study (3-9 Credits) Students within the interreligious studies program may opt to study a topic in-depth with a final paper/project. By permission. 03.01.029 General Religious Independent Study (3-9 Credits) Students from any program may elect to engage in a general religious studies topic, culminating in a final paper or project. By permission. 03.01.030 Interreligious Practicum (10 Credits) Students working on a ministerial/combined tract in interreligious studies are required to complete a supervised and mentored ministerial internship program. Handbook provided. 03.01.031 Interreligious Masters Thesis (10 Credits) Students working on the scholar/combined tract in interreligious studies are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided. 03.01.032 Interreligious Dissertation (20 Credits) Students at the doctoral level of interreligious studies are required to complete a dissertation. Handbook provided. 03.01.033 Twelve Steps Toward a Compassionate Life (9 Credits) This course students spend the year actively working toward manifesting a compassionate life and bringing to bear in their own lives the “Charter for Compassion”. Text: Twelve Steps to a Compassionate Life by Karen Armstrong. Additional readings supplied. 03.02 Christian Studies 03.02.001 Introduction to Biblical Studies (3 Credits) This course introduces the student to the field of biblical studies within a Christian context. Texts: Introduction to Biblical Studies by Steven Moyise Biblical Studies Alternatively: An Introductory Reader by Susanne Sholz (buy used) The Green Bible by Harper Bibles (NRSV) 03.02.002 Christianity within an Historical Context (3 Credits) This course looks at the historical contexts and influences that shaped/shape the unfolding of the Christian faith. Text: Christianity: The First 3,000 Years by Diarmaid MacCulloch 03.02.003 A Survey of the New Testament (3 Credits) This course provides a specific background into the history and writings of the major texts of the New Testament. Text: The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings by Bart Ehrman

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

92

Additional readings supplied 03.02.004 Books of the New Testament (3 Credits) This course varies from semester to semester and includes specific examination in-depth of the various writings of the New Testament. 03.02.005-03.02.006 Biblical Exegesis I & II (6 Credits) This course introduces the students to the major literary form of the New Testament and the methods in which we may interpret the text and apply them within a ministerial context. Texts: Course I & II The Hermeneutical Spiral: A Comprehensive Introduction to Biblical Interpretation by Grant Osborne Biblical Exegesis: A Beginner’s Handbook by John Hayes Course I Literary Forms in the New Testament by James Bailey & Lyle Vander Broeck Narrative Criticism of the New Testament: An Introduction by James L. Resseguie Course II New Testament Exegesis: A Handbook for Students & Pastors by Gordon Fee Old Testament Exegesis: A Handbook for Students & Pastors by Douglas Stuart 03.02.007 The Life of Jesus: In Context & Meaning (3 Credits) This course examines the historical and religious meanings of Jesus. Texts: The Historical Figure of Jesus by EP Sanders The Meaning of Jesus: Two Visions by Marcus Borg and NT Wright 03.02.008 The Life of Paul & His Impact (3 Credits) This course examines the historical and Christian perspectives on Paul; as well as introduces critical elements of his theology. Texts: Paul: A Very Short Introduction by EP Sanders The Letters of Paul (5th Ed): Conversations in Context by Calvin Roetzal Paul Among Jews & Gentile by Krister Stendahl Paul: The Man & the Myth by Calbin Roetzal 03.02.009 Theologies & Politics of Martin Luther & the Reformation (3 Credits) This course introduces the student to the Protestant Reformation and specifically to the life and theology of Martin Luther. Text: The Reformation: How a Monk & a Mallet Changed the World by Stephen Nicols Martin Luther: Selections from His Writings by Martin Luther, Edited by John Dillenberger Martin Luther: A Life by Martin E. Marty 03.02.010 Survey of Patristic Writings (3 Credits) This course introduces the students to the early Christian writers and “fathers” and their theological impacts. Text: Fathers of the Church: A Comprehensive Introduction by Hubertus Drobner (Schatzmann Translation) Additional readings supplied.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

93

03.02.011 Special Topics in Patrology (3 Credits) The topics of this course vary semester-to-semester and are structured around specific texts of early church fathers and their theological and historical impacts to biographical impacts. 03.02.012 Christian Theologies: A Survey (3 Credits) This course introduces students to the field of Christian Theology and what it means to “do” theology. Texts: Christian Theology: An Introduction (4th Ed) by Alister McGrath A Christian Theology Reader by Alister McGrath 03.02.013 Special Topics in Christian Theology (3 Credits) This course varies semester-to-semester and examines specific types of theology that have emerged, such as Systematic/Constructive, Process, Metaphorical, Postcolonial, Liberation, etc. as well as specific topics of theology, such as Eschatology, Christology, Pneumatology, Soteriology, Theodicy, etc. 03.02.014-03.02.015 Theologies of Disability, Heterosexism, and Cultural Otherness (6 Credits) This course looks at several issues that may be broadly viewed as “other” from the traditional fatheroriented, all-abled, heterosexual theologies of Christianity. Students examine issues of gender, sexuality, race, non-Christian status, and disability. Course I Exclusion & Embrace: A Theological Exploration of Identity, Otherness, & Reconciliation by Miroslav Volf Just Hospitality: God’s Welcome in a World of Difference by Letty Russell The Disabled God: Toward a Liberatory Theology of Disability by Nancy Eisland Course II hom*osexuality and Christian Faith: Questions of Conscience for the Churches by Walter Wink Gifted by Otherness: Gay and Lesbian Christians in the Church by L. William Countryman & MR Ritley 03.02.016 Embodiment & Sexuality (3 Credits) This course looks at the theological struggle of the body and examines how the body itself becomes sacred within Christianity. Texts: Embodiment: An Approach to Sexuality and Christian Theology by James Nelson The Embrace of Eros: Bodies, Desires, and Sexuality in Christianity by Margaret Kamitsuka Sexuality and the Black Church: A Womanist Perspective by Kelly Brown Douglas 03.02.017 Divisions: The Plurality of Christianity in Contemporary Society (3 Credits) This course looks at the diversity within Christian communities and their beliefs in the contemporary society. Texts: Christianity’s Family Tree Participant’s Guide: What Other Christians Believe and Why by Adam Hamilton Choosing Your Religion: The Book of Denominations by Philip Koehn Additional readings supplied. 03.02.018-03.02.019 Fundamentalism & Evangelicalism: A Complex Sociopolitical & Religious Encounter (6 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

94

This course looks at the history of Christian Fundamentalism and Evangelicalism in the US and its current impact on modern US society, as well as the underlying theology from within Evangelical theological perspective. Course I Understanding Fundamentalism & Evangelicalism by George Marsden Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism by Michelle Goldberg Course II New Perspectives for Evangelical Theology: Engaging with God, Scripture, and the World by Tom Greggs The Kingdom of Christ: The New Evangelical Perspective by Russell Moore 03.02.020-03.02.021 Women within Biblical Tradition (6 Credits) This course examines women within the Hebrew Scriptures and the New Testament and their meaning for Christians and particularly for women. Additionally, this course will look at the important role women played within Christianity and its meaning to women in antiquity. Course I Reading the Women of the Bible: A New Interpretation of Their Stories by Tikva Frymer-Kensky Women in the New Testament: Questions and Commentaries by Bonnie Thurston Course II A Woman’s Place: House Churches in Earliest Christianity by Carolyn Osiek et al. Gospel of Mary of Magdala: Jesus and the First Women Apostles by Karen King 03.02.022-03.02.023 Readings in the Gnostic Gospels I & II (6 Credits) This extensive course examines the historical impact of the Gnostic (the “other”) sects in the formation of Christianity and examines in-depth the specific scriptures left behind and their theological significance. Course I & II The Nag Hammadi Scriptures: The Revised & Updated Translation..in 1 vol. by Meyer & Robinson Course I The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels Course II Reading Judas: The Gospel of Judas and the Shaping of Christianity by Elaine Pagels & Karen King Additional reading supplied. 03.02.024 Reading the Pistis Sophia (3 Credits) This course looks at the Gnostic text the Pistis Sophia and its implications for Christianity and a tradition of Mary Magdalen. Text: Pistis Sophia (any affordable translation) 03.02.025 The Greening of Christianity (3 Credits) This course looks at the growing trend within Christianity toward an environmentally friendly ethic. Texts: Green Sisters: A Spiritual Ecology by Sarah McFarland Taylor A New Climate for Theology: God, the World, & Global Warming Sallie Mcfa*gue Our Father’s World: Mobilizing the Church to Care for Creation by Edward R. Brown 03.02.026 Christian Ethics (3 Credits) This course looks at the field of Christian Ethics and also will address applied ethics for the minister. Text: The Cambridge Companion to Christian Ethics by Robin Gill Additional readings supplied 03.02.027-03.02.028 Christian Homiletics I & II (6 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

This course introduces the student to and shepherds them through more advance skills with Christian sermon writing, its purpose, and the associated art of preaching. Course I Homiletic Moves and Structures by David Buttrick The Homiletical Plot: The Sermon as Narrative Art Form by Eugene Lowry Course II Inductive Preaching: Helping People Listen by Ralph Lewis & Greg Lewis Twelve Essential Skills for Preaching by Wayne McDill 03.02.029-03.02.030 Christian Liturgy (6 Credits) This course looks at the role and function of ritual and the liturgical calendar within the Christian year. Course I The Study of Liturgy by Cheslyn Jones et al. Introduction to Christian Worship James White Course II Symbols of Christian Faith by Alca William Stefflar Living the Christian Year: Time to Inhabit the Story of God by Bobby Gross Additional readings supplied 03.02.031 Christian Educator (3 Credits) This course looks at best practices for teaching Christian youth about their faith. Text: Joining Children on the Spiritual Journey: Nurturing a Life of Faith by Catherine Stonehouse Additional readings supplied. 03.02.032 Independent Christian Study (3-9 Credits) This course is designed for students to craft their own specific research in a topic within Christianity, culminating in a final paper/project. 03.02.033 Christian Practicum (10 Credits) Students working along the ministerial/combined tracts must participate in a supervised, mentored internship whereby they lead religious services. 03.02.034 Christian Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students working on their masters work in Christianity are required to complete a thesis. By permission. Handbook provided. 03.02.035 Christian Dissertation (20 Credits) Students working on their doctoral work in Christianity are required to complete a dissertation. By permission. Handbook provided. 03.03 Judaic Studies 03.03.001 Jewish History: A Culture & a Faith (3 Credits) This course examines the history and modern experiences of the Jewish people and the relationship between history, experience, and the rise and expression of Judaism. Text: History of the Jews in Modern Times by Lloyd Gartner 03.03.002 A Survey of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) (3 Credits)

95

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

96

This course introduces the student to the Hebrew Bible and major themes within the text. Texts: The Old Testament: An Introduction to the Hebrew Bible by Stephen L. Harris & Robert Platzner The Jewish Bible: The Tanakh by the Jewish Publication Society 03.03.003-03.03.004: Midrash: Jewish Exegesis (6 Credits) This course looks at the process of Jewish Rabbinical interpretation. Texts: God’s Echo: Exploring Scripture with Midrash by Sandy Sasso Learning to Read Midrash by Simi Peters Song and Story in Biblical Narrative: The History of Literary Convention in Ancient Israel by Steven Weitzman [Recommended: Midrashic Women by Judith Baskin] 03.03.005 The Torah: The Five Books of Moses (3 Credits) This course explores in greater depths diverse interpretations of the Torah as a sacred text. Texts: Seventy Faces of Torah: The Jewish Way of Reading the Sacred Scriptures by Stephen Wylen For the Love of God: The Bible as an Open Book by Alicia Ostrikier Revision: Seeing the Torah through a Feminist Lens by Elyse Goldstein 03.03.006 Nevi’im: The Writings of the Prophets (3 Credits) This course explores in greater depth the collected literature of the Neviim or the “Prophets”. Text: Reading Prophetic Narratives by Uriel Simon Additional readings provided 03.03.007 Ketuvim: The Wisdom Writings (3 Credits) This course explore in greater depth the collected literature of the Ketuvim, known as the “Wisdom Literature”. Text: Shir Hashirim; Kohelet; Mishlei; Ruth (all textual commentaries with original Hebrew) by Kravitz & Olitzky Additional reading provided. 03.03.008-03.03.009: The Talmud and the Rabbinical Tradition (6 Credits) This course explores the rich heritage of Rabbinical thought and writing. Texts: The Talmud: A Selection by Normon Solomon Rabbinic Stories by Jeffrey Rubenstein Hasidic Tales: Annotated & Explained by Rabbi Rami Shapiro Additional readings provided. 03.03.010 Rabbinical Ethics (3 Credits) This course examines historical and contemporary perspectives of Jewish Ethics. Texts: Ethics of the Sages: Pirke Avot by Rami Shapiro Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader by Elliot Dorff 03.03.011-03.03.012 Jewish Mysticism & Kabbalah (6 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

97

This course explores and introduces the student to Kabbalah and Jewish Mysticism. Texts: Kabbalah for the Student by Rav Yehuda Ashlag The Kabbalistic Tradition by Alan Unterman Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism by Gershom Scholem Additional texts provided 03.03.013-03.03.014 Jewish Theologies (6 Credits) This course examines Jewish theological discourse and conceptions. Course I God in Search of Man by Abraham Heschel Sacred Attunement: A Jewish Theology by Michael Fishbane Course II Engendering Judaism: An Inclusive Theology and Ethics by Rachel Adler Jewish Theology in Our Time by Elliot Cosgrove 03.03.015 The Shoah & Faith (3 Credits) This course examines the impact of the Shoah (Holocaust) on Jewish faith and theology. Texts: Wrestling with God: Jewish Theological Responses During and After the Holocaust by Steven Katz The Era of Witness by Annette Wieviorka 03.03.016-03.03.017 Gender, Sexuality, and Otherness in Judaism (6 Credits) This course examines the interpretative and engagement of otherness, that is a non-male, nonheterosexual interpretative location within Judaism, including the rise of “queer” scriptural interpretation and women’s experience within Judaism. Course I Lesbian Rabbis: The First Generation by Rebecca T. Alpert, Sue Levi Elwell and Shirley Idelson Torah Queeries by Joshua Lesser A Gay Synagogue in New York by Moshe Shokeid Course II Reading Ruth: Contemporary Women Reclaim a Sacred Story by Judith Kates On Women and Judaism by Blu Greenberg Standing Again at Sinai: Judaism from a Feminist Perspective by Judith Plaskow Yentl’s Revenge: Next Wave of Jewish Feminism by Danya Ruttenberg 03.03.018-03.03.019 Jewish Liturgy & Homiletics (6 Credits) This course explores Jewish liturgy (sacred days and rites) and the structure of the Jewish sermon. Course I Jewish Liturgy: A Comprehensive History by Ismar Elbogen Judaism & Hebrew Prayer: New Perspectives on Jewish Liturgical History by Reif Stefan Seasons of Our Joy by Arthur Waskow Course II A Treasury of Favorite Sermons by Leading American Rabbis by Sidney Greenberg Jewish Preaching, 1200-1800: An Anthology by Marc Saperstein Additional readings supplied. 03.03.020 Special Topics in Jewish Prayer (3 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

98

This course varies throughout semesters and examines specific aspects related to the role, function, and manifestation of prayer within Jewish liturgical and private devotional practice. 03.03.021 Judaism and the Environment (3 Credits) This course examines the ways in which Judaism may theologized to promote environmentally responsible behavior and orientation.Text: Judaism and Ecology: Created World and Revealed Word by Tirosh-Samuelson et. al 03.03.022 Judaism in Contemporary Society (3 Credits) This course looks at the diversity within modern-day Jewish practice. Text: Judaism Today by Dan CohnSherbok 03.03.023 Middle East Conflict (3 Credits) This course examines the ongoing social, religious, and political conflict of the Middle East. Texts: The Lemon Tree: An Arab, a Jew, and the Heart of the Middle East by Sandy Tolen The Israel-Arab Reader: A Documentary History of the Middle East Conflict (7th Ed) by Walter Laquer & Barry Rubin 03.03.024 Independent Study in Judaism (3-9 Credits) Students working toward their masters in Judaism may elect to develop a specific course of study that culminates in a final paper or project. By permission. 03.03.025 Judaism Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students working toward their master are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided. 03.04 Islamic Studies 03.04.001 Introduction to the Islamic Faith (3 Credits) This course will look at the emergence of the Islamic faith in history, providing an overview of major theological and social practices. This course will also look at the relationship between cultural identity and religion. Text: The Oxford History of Islam by John Esposito Additional readings supplied 03.04.002 Contemporary Issues in Islam (3 Credits) This course will look at contemporary issues associated with Islam, specifically with a focus on the tensions between Western–Monotheistic cultures and Islam. This course will look at the historical roots of tension and current sources of conflict. Additional focus will look to contemporary Islamic societies and their preset-day struggles. Texts: Islam, the West and the Challenges of Modernity by Tariq Ramadan Peace Be Upon You by Zachary Karabell 03.04.003 The Prophet Muhammad (3 Credits) This course will explore the life of Muhammad and his role in creating a unified faith and culture. Texts: In the Footsteps of the Prophet: Lessons from the Life of Muhammad by Tariq Ramadan

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

99

Muhammad: His Life Based on Earliest Sources by Marin Lings 03.04.004–005 Holy Qur’an (6 Credits) This course will explore in-depth the Qur’an and its central role as the final and revealed word of God. Texts: The Story of the Qur’an by Ingrid Mattson A Thematic Commentary on the Quran by Shaykh Muohammad Ghazzaalai The Holy Qur’an (any translation) 03.04.006 Introduction to the Hadith (3 Credits) This course will explore the Hadith as the collection of Muhammad’s ethical, political, religious, and legal discourses that shape historic and contemporary Muslim life and Mid-Eastern society. Texts: The Hadith by Jonathan Brown Sexual Ethics and Islam by Kecia Ali Hadith translations (avl online) 03.04.007 An Introduction Islamic Mysticism (3 Credits) This course will explore the rise of Islamic mysticism with specific attention to Sufism. Texts: Early Islamic Mysticism by Michael Anthony Sells Essential Sufism by Roger Frager The Garden of Truth by Seyyed Nasr 03.04.008 The Life of Rumi (3 Credits) This course will look at the life and writings of the Sufi poet, Rumi. Prerequisite 03.04.007 Texts: Rumi: Past and Present, East and West: The Life, Teachings, and Poetry of Jalal al-Din Rumi by Franklin Lewis Reading Mystical Lyric by Fatemah Kesharvarz Masnavi books 1 and 2 by Jalal al-Din Rumi (Oxford World Classics Ed) 03.04.009 The Conference of the Birds (3 Credits) This course will explore the poetical mystic text The Conference of the Birds and its implication to Islamic theology. Prerequisite 03.04.007 Text: The Conference of the Birds by Attar, translated by Dick Davis 03.04.010 -03.04.012 Islamic Theology (9 Credits) This course will look at Islamic Theology in both historical and contemporary thought. Course I Introduction to Islamic Theology and Law by Ignaz Goldzihar The Cambridge Companion to Classical Islamic Theology by Tim Winter A History of Islamic Philosophy by Majid Fakhry Course II The Elixir of the Gnostics by Mulla Sudra Milestones by Seyyid Qutb Course III Defenders of Reason in Islam by Richard Martin A Guide to Conclusive Proofs for the Principles of Belief by Imam Al-Juwayni

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

100

Additional reading supplied 03.04.013 Islamic Celebrations, Rites, & Practices (3 Credits) This course explores the rich liturgical structure of Islam, as well as personal practices. Texts: The Islamic Year by Noorah Al-Gailini (for parents and children) Fasting In Islam by Ali Budak Charity in Islam by Omar Senturk Pilgrimage in Islam by Huseyin Yamur The Islamic Prayer from A to Z by Mamdouh Mohamed 03.04.014 Islamic Homiletics (3 Credits) This course examines the practice and craft of sermon writing. Texts: Speaking for a Change by Wael Alkhairo Orations of the Fatimid Caliphs: Festival Sermons of Ismaili Imams by Paul Walker 03.04.015-03.04.017 Gender, Sexuality, and Otherness in Islam and Being Islamic (9 Credits) This course examines issues of gender and sexuality within Islamic thought, experience, and culture. Course I Qur’an and Woman by Amina Wadud Women in the Qur’an, Traditions, and Interpretations by Barbara Stowasser Women and Gender in Islam: Historical Roots of a Modern Debate by Leila Ahmed Course II hom*osexuality in Islam: Islamic Reflection on Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Muslims by Scott Kugle Hijab: Unveiling Queer Muslim Lives by Pepe Hendricks Islam and Aids: Between Scorn, Pity, and Justice by Farid Esack Course III The Muslim Next Door by Sumbal Ali-Karamali A Suitable Enemy: Racism, Migration, and Islamophobia in Europe by Liz Fekete Islamophobia: The Ideological Campaign Against Muslims by Stephen Sheehi (if avl) [Recommended: American Crescent by Hassan Qazwini (if avl)] 03.04.018 Nature & Islamic Faith (3 Credits) This course will look at the role of Nature within the Islamic faith and its location with the scriptures. It will explore the relationship between its position and human behavior toward Nature. Text: Islam and Ecology: A Bestowed Trust by Richard C Foltz 03.04.019 Special Topics (3 Credits) This course is designed to amplify other areas of the Islamic faith, its practice and its history through intensive focus on specific topics that vary from semester-to-semester. 03.04.020 Independent Study in Islam (3-9 Credits) Students working toward their masters in Islam may elect to develop a specific course of study that culminates in a final paper or project. By permission. 03.04.021 Islam Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students working toward their master are required to complete a master’s thesis.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

101

Handbook provided. 03.05 Buddhist Studies 03.05.001 Introduction to Buddhism (3 Credits) This course will look at the historical rise of Buddhism, its religious structure and sects, and contemporary issues. Discussions will include an exploration of major themes and philosophies that underscore Buddhism. Text: Buddhism: A Concise Introduction by Huston Smith Additional readings supplied 03.05.002 Siddhartha Gautama as Buddha (3 Credits) This course will look at the historical, religious, and mythic Buddha, as well as the role of Buddha as an attainable state of awareness rather than a specific person. Text: Buddha by Karen Armstrong Additional readings supplied 03.05.003-03.05.004 Buddhist Philosophy (6 Credits) This course examines the rich history of Buddhist philosophy and religious thought. Course I An Introduction to Buddhist Philosophy by Stephan Laumakis Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings by William Edgelglass Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism by John Powers Course II Manual of Zen Buddhism by DT Sazuki Toward a Philosophy of Zen Buddhism by Toshihiko Izutsu Gateless Gate by Kuon Yamada 03.05.005 The Four Noble Truths & The Noble Eightfold Path (3 Credits) This course will look in-depth at the guiding principles of Buddhism. The Four Noble Truths by Ven. Lobsang Gyatso Additional readings supplied 03.05.006 Readings in Vinaya Pitaka: The Ethics of Buddha (3 Credits) This course will explore scriptural writing associated with the Vinaya Pitake, one of the baskets of the canonical Tipitaka. Texts available online 03.05.007 Readings in Suttanta Pitaka: The Discourses of Buddha (3 Credits) This course will explore scriptural writing associated with the Suttanta Pitake, the second basket of the canonical Tipitaka. Texts available online 03.05.008 Readings Abhidhamma Pitaka: The Metaphysics of Buddha (3 Credits) This course will explore scriptural writing associated with the Abhidhamma Pitake, the third basket of the canonical Tipitaka. Texts available online 03.05.009 The Lotus Sutra (3 Credits) This course will explore in-depth the meaning and role of the Lotus Sutra in Buddhism.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

102

Text available online 03.05.010 The Heart Sutra (3 Credits) This course will explore in-depth the meaning and role of the Heart Sutra in Buddhism. Text: The Heart Sutra trans by Bill Porter 03.05.011 The Diamond Sutra (3 Credits) This course will explore in-depth the meaning and role of the Diamond Sutra in Buddhism. Text: Diamond Sutra trans. Red Pine 03.05.012-03.05.013 Meditation, Prayer, Daily Devotion, & Liturgy (6 Credits) This course will look at mindfulness meditation, the role of prayer and activities of daily devotion within the Buddhist religious life. Course I Chanting from the Heart by Thich Nhat Hanh The Heart of Buddhist Meditation by Thera Nyanponika Course II The Wheel of Great Compassion by Rinpoche The Energy of Prayer by Thich Nhat Hanh The Buddhist Fasting Practice by Rinpoche The Handbook of Tibetan Buddhist Symbols by Robert Beer 03.05.014 Buddhist Teachers (3 Credits) This course will explore select writings of various historical and contemporary Buddhist teachers, including the Dalai Lama. 03.05.015-03.05.016 Contemporary Issues in Buddhism (6 Credits) This course explores current historical issues impacting Buddhism. Course I Soaring and Settling: Buddhist Perspectives on Contemporary Social & Religious Issues by Rita Gross Course II The Snow Lion and the Dragon by Melvyn Goldstein Buddhism in America by Richard Seager 03.05.017 Nature & Buddhism (3 Credits) This course will explore the relationship and location of Nature within Buddhist religious life and scripture and the relationship of this location to environmental behavior. Texts: Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology by Allan Badiner The World We Have: A Buddhist Approach to Peace & Ecology by Thich Nhat Hanh 03.05.018 Buddhist Ethics (3 Credits) This course examines ethical frameworks according to Buddhist teachings. Text: Buddhist Ethics by Hammalawa Saddhatissa 03.05.019 Special Topics (3 Credits) This course is designed to amplify other areas of the Buddhism, its practice and its history through intensive focus on specific topics that vary from semester-to-semester.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

103

03.05.020 Independent Study in Buddhism (3-9 Credits) Students working toward their masters in Buddhism may elect to develop a specific course of study that culminates in a final paper or project. By permission. 03.05.021 Buddhist Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students working toward their master are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided. 03.06 Taoism & Chinese Religious Traditions 03.06.001-03.06.002 Chinese Philosophy (6 Credits) This course provides an introduction to the emergence of Taoism and Chinese traditional religious practices. The course will look at the historical and cultural influences and contemporary manifestations of such traditions. Course I Introduction to Chinese Philosophy: From Ancient Philosophy to Chinese Buddhism by Jeeloo Liu Course II Disputers of Tao: Philosophical Argument in Ancient China by AC Graham Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy by Philip Ivanhoe & Bryan W van Norden Additional readings supplied 03.06.003 Nature in Taoism (3 Credits) This course will look at the role of Nature within Taoist and tradition Chinese religious thought and its impact on adherent’s behavior and Chinese culture. Texts: Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought by J Baird Calicott and Roger T. Ames Daoism and Ecology by NJ Giradot Additional readings supplied 03.06.004 Ancestors and Gods: An Introduction to Religion in Chinese History (3 Credits) This course will look at the polytheistic aspects of Taoism and traditional Chinise folk and religious systems. Specifically this course will look at the role of ancestral spirits in the day-to-day life, health and function of the worshipers. Texts: Chinese Gods: An Introduction to Chinese Folk Religion by Jonathan Chamberlain Chinese Religion: An Anthology of Sources by Deborah Sommer Additional readings supplied 03.06.005 Tao Te Ching (3 Credits) This course will critically explore the Tao Te Ching; its historical, philosophical, and religious functions. Text: Daodejing: A Philosophical Translation by Roger Ames & David Hall [this is a must translation] 03.06.006 Wu-Forms: Effortless Action (3 Credits) This course explores in greater depth the concept of Wu-forms that are introduced as critical philosophical themes within the Tao Te Ching. Text: Effortless Action: Wu-Wei as a Conceptual Metaphor & Spiritual Ideal in Early China by Edward Slingerland Additional readings supplied

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

104

03.06.007 The Inner Chapters (3 Credits) This course will explore the other main text of Taoism and its role in shaping the philosophy and orientation of the Way. Texts: Wandering at Ease in the Zuangzi by Roger T Ames Inner Chapters trans. AC Graham 03.06.008 Select Readings in Taoism: Historical (3 Credits) This course will explore more minor historical writings in Taoism and their function in shaping the philosophy. Texts will vary semester to semester. 03.06.009 Select Readings in Taoism: Contemporary (3 Credits) This course will look at contemporary writers and practitioners as they apply the tenets of the historical texts to everyday experiences. Texts will vary semester to semester. 03.06.010 Confucius This course examines the Confucius’ key texts and explores their relationship in giving rise to and counterpointing Taosim. Students are required to have taking courses 03.06.001-03.06.002 and 30.06.005. Texts: Thinking through Confucius by Roger T Ames and David Hall The Analects of Confucius by Roger T Ames and Henry Rosemont 03.06.011 Select Readings in Chinese Folk Traditions & Storytelling (3 Credits) This course will vary semester to semester and will explore the deeper trends of Chinese Folk practices and traditions through storytelling, myth, and ritual. Texts will vary. 03.06.012 Special Topics (3 Credits) This course is designed to amplify other areas of the Taoism and Chinese philosophy, its practice and its history through intensive focus on specific topics that vary from semester-to-semester. 03.06.013 Independent Study in Taoism and Chinese Religious Traditions (3-9 Credits) Students working toward their masters in Taoism and Chinese Religious Traditions may elect to develop a specific course of study that culminates in a final paper or project. By permission. 03.06.014 Taoism and Chinese Religious Traditions Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students working toward their master are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided. 03.07 Hinduism 03.07.001-03.07.002 Introduction to Hinduism & Indian History (6 Credits) This course will introduce the religion of Hinduism and its historical and cultural emergence, as well as its current implications in modern-day societies. Course I India: The Definitive History by DR SarDesai Course II

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

105

An Introduction to Hinduism by Gavin Flood The Artful Universe: An Introduction to the Vedic Religious Imagination by William Mahoney 03.07.003–03.07.004 Vedic Literature (6 Credits) These two courses will critically explore the four Vedas within Hinduism and their religious and social meaning. Texts available online. 03.07.005 Upanishads (3 Credits) This course will explore the role of the Upanishads in religious life and theology. Text available online. 03.07.006-03.07.007 Readings in the Ramayana and Mahabharata (6 Credits) This course will read selections from the mythic texts and their role in shaping Hinduism; including a specific focus on the Bhagavadgita. Course I The Ramayana: A Shortened Modern Prose Version of the Indian Epic by RK Narayan Course II The Mahabharata trans John D. Smith 03.07.008-02.07.009 Ayurveda Medicine (6 Credits) This course will look at Ayurvedic Medicine as a system of healing that integrates religious and physical systems of knowing. Course I Textbook of Ayurveda Medicine (Vol 1) by Vasant Lad Course II Textbook of Ayurveda Medicine (Vol 2) by Vasant Lad 03.07.010 Special Topics in Ayurveda Medicine (3 Credits) This course explores specific topics in Ayurveda Medicine in greater depth. Topics and texts vary from semester to semester. 03.07.011-03.07.012 The Life and Teachings of Mahatma Ghandi (6 Credits) This course will look at the life of Gandhi and the relationship between his religious life and social philosophy. This course will explore his writings on non-violence resistance. Course I Non-Violent Resistance by Gandhi The Essential Gandhi edited by Louis Fischer Course II India after Gandhi: The History of the World’s Largest Democracy by Ramachandra Guha 03.07.013 Nature in Hinduism (3 Credits) This course will look at the role of Nature within the Hindu faith and its implications in human behavior and environmental relatedness. Texts: River of Love in the Age of Pollution by David Haberman Hinduism and Ecology by Christopher Key Chapple 03.07.014 An Introduction to Hindu Rituals (3 Credits) This course examines rites and rituals within the broader Hindu tradition. Text:

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

106

Hindu Rites, Rituals, Customs, and Traditions by Prem Bhalla Additional reading supplied 03.07.015 Hindu Goddesses & Ritual Practice (3 Credits) This course examines the role of the Goddess within Hindu practice. Texts: Hindu Goddesses: Beliefs and Practices by Lynn Foulston & Stuart Abbott Victory of the Mother: The Hindu Goddesses of Northwest India in Myth, Ritual & Symbol by Kathleen Erndl 03.07.016-03.07.017 Women in Hinduism (6 Credits) This course looks at the role of women within contemporary Hindu practice. Course I Women’s Lives and Women’s Rituals in Hindu Tradition by Tracy Pintchman Course II The Graceful Guru: Hindu Female Gurus in India & the United States by Karen Pechilis Dharma’s Daughters: Contemporary Indian Women and Indian Culture by Sara S Mitter 03.07.018-03.07-019 Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender in Hinduism (6 Credits) This course examines the role of Hinduism as a viable spirituality for gay men, lesbian women and transgendered individuals. Course I Tritiya-Prakriti: People of the Third Sex: Understanding hom*osexuality, Transgender Identity, and Intersex Conditions through Hinduism by Amara Das Wilhem Course II The Man Who Was a Woman and Other Queer Tales of Hindu Lore by Devdutt Pattanaik Same-sex Love in India: Readings from Literature and History by Ruth Vanita 03.07.020 Hindu Ethics (3 Credits) This course examines ethical frameworks within Hinduism. Texts: Hindu Ethics by Harold Coward, Julius Lipner, & Katherine Young Ethics in the Mahabharata: A Philosophical Inquiry for Today by Sitansu Chakravati 03.07.021 Special Topics (3 Credits) This course is designed to amplify other areas of Hinduism, its practice and its history through intensive focus on specific topics that vary from semester-to-semester. 03.07.022 Independent Study in Hinduism (3-9 Credits) Students working toward their masters in Hinduism may elect to develop a specific course of study that culminates in a final paper or project. By permission. 03.07.023 Hinduism Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students working toward their master are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided. 04 Department of Theology & Religious Philosophy

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

107

04.01 Feminist Theology 04.01.001–04.01.002 Contextualizing Women in Religion (6 Credits) This course examines the experience and locations of women in the world’s religions. Course I Women and World Religions by Lucinda Joy Peach Women in Religion by Mary Pat Fisher Course II Unspoken Worlds: Women’s Religious Lives by Nancy Auer Falk 04.01.003–04.01.004 Feminism at World Religion (6 Credits) This course examines the impact and location of feminist discourse and social orientation within reconceptualizing women in the global religious contexts Course I Feminism & Religion by Rita Gross Postructuralism, Feminism, and Religion: Triangulating Positions by Carol Wayne White Women’s Studies in Religion: A Multicultural Reader by Kate Bagley and Kathleen McIntosh Course II After Patriarchy: Feminist Transformations of World Religions by Paula M. Cooley Good Sex: Feminist Perspectives from the World’s Religions by Radhika Balakrishan Religious Feminism & the Future of the Planet by Rita Gross and Rosemary Radford Ruether 04.01.005–009 Introduction to Feminist Theology I, II, III, IV, V (15 Credits) This course explores key themes in Feminist Theology. I: General Course I Introducing Feminist Theology by Anne M. Clifford Cambridge Companion to Feminist Theology by Parsons Susan Franks Feminist Theology and the Challenge of Difference by Margaret Kamitsuka [Recommended: WomanSpirit Rising by Carol Christ & Judith Plaskow Weaving the Visions by Carol Christ & Judith Plaskow] II-III: Judeo/Christian Feminist Perspectives Course II Freeing Theology: The Essentials of Theology in Feminist Perspective by Catherine Lacugna Feminism and Theology by Janet Martin Soskice and Diana Lipton Course III She Who Is by Elizabeth Johnson Bread Not Stone: The Challenge of Feminist Biblical Interpretation by Elisabeth Fiorenza IV-V: Advanced Concepts & Multicultural/Inclusion Perspectives Course IV Controversies in Feminist Theology by Lisa Isherwood Controversies in Body Theology by Marcella Althaus-Reid Course V From Feminist Theology to Indecent Theology: Readings on Poverty, Sexual Identity, and God by Marcella Althaus-Reid

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

Postcolonial Imagination & Feminist Theology by Kwok Pui-la A Reader in Latina Feminist Theology: Religion and Justice by Maria Pilar Aquino et. al. 04.01.010 Religion and Sexism (3 Credits) This course explores current discussions on elements of patriarchy within religious systems. Texts: Sexism and God-Talk by Rosemary Radford Ruether Beyond God the Father by Mary Daly The Church and the Second Sex by Mary Daly 04.01.011-04.01.012 Womanist Theology (6 Credits) This course examines the Womanist Christian theological movement, its sociopolitical contexts and its core features. Course I Deeper Shades of Purple: Womanism in Religion and Society by Stacey Floyd-Thomas Making a Way Out of No Way: A Womanist Theology by Monica Coleman Course II Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenges of Womanist God-Talk by Delores Williams 04.01.013 Feminist Theology, Ecofeminism, and Nature (3 Credits) This course examines how feminist theology encounters and examines the natural environment. Women Healing Earth: Third World Women on Ecology, Feminism, & Religion by Rosemary Radford Ruether Gaia and God: An Ecofeminist Theology of Earth Healing by Rosemary Radford Ruether Additional readings supplied. 04.01.014 Women’s Religious History Through Sacred Texts (3 Credits) This course explores a rich and often unknown history of women’s writing within diverse religious traditions. Texts: Sacred Texts by and about Women by Serinity Young Wise Women: Over 2000 Years of Spiritual Writing by Women by Susan Cahill 04.01.015 Introduction Feminist Theory (3 Credits) This course explores the emergence and diversity of the broader field of feminist theory. Text: Feminist Theory: A Reader by Wendy Kolmar and Frances Bartkowski 04.01.016 Feminist Theological Ethics (3 Credits) This course explores ethical frameworks from a feminist perspective. Text: Feminist Theological Ethics by Lois K. Daly 04.01.017 Readings in Feminist Theology (3 Credits) This course will vary semester to semester and will examine critical thinkers, texts, or theories that amplify an area of Feminist Theology. 04.01.018 Independent Study in Feminist Theology (3-9 Credits) Students working toward their masters in Feminist Theology may elect to develop a specific course of study that culminates in a final paper or project. By permission.

108

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

04.01.019 Feminist Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students working toward their master are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided. 04.01.020 Feminist Theology Dissertation (20 Credits) Students working toward their doctorate are required to complete a dissertation. Handbook provided.

04.02 Theology Note Prerequisite for all Theology Courses: 03.01.006 Introduction to Theology - A Global Perspective 04.02.001 Negative/Apophatic Theology (3 Credits) This course explores perspectives on the theological lens of negative/apophatic theology. Texts: Apophatic Body: Negative Theology, Incarnation, and Relationality by Chris Boesel & Catherine Keller Being with God: Trinity, Aphophaticism, and Divine-Human Communion by Aristotle Papanikolaou [Recommended: Flight of the Gods: Philosophical on Negative Theology by Ilse Bulhof and Laurens ten Kate, if avl] 04.02.002 -04.02.003 Natural Theology I & II (6 Credits) This course examines frameworks of Natural Theology. Course I Natural Theology by William Paley In Defense of Natural Theology by Jammes Sennett and Douglas Groothius Belief in God in the Age of Science by John Polkinghorne Course II Deciphering the Signs of God by Annemarie Schimmal A Christian Natural Theology by John B. Cobb [Recommended: Religion in the Age of Science by Ian Barbour if avl] Additional readings supplied. 04.02.004 -04.02.005 Process Theology I & II (6 Credits) This course examines the framework and concerns of Process Theology. Course I Process and Reality by Alfred North Whitehead Omnipotence and Other Theological Mistakes by Charles Hartshorne Process Theology by John Cobb & David Ray Griffin Course II On the Mystery: Discerning Divinity in Process by Catherine Keller Handbook of Jewish Theology & Process Thought by Jay McDaniel & Donna Bowman Hidden Circles in the Web: Feminist Wicca & Process Thought by Constance Wise 04.02.006 -04.02.007 Systematic Theology (6 Credits) This course examines the framework of Systematic Theology and related Constructive and Dogmatic Theologies.

109

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

110

Course I Systematic Theology Vols 1-3 by Paul Tillich Course II The Face of the Deep: A Theology of Becoming by Catherine Keller Essays in Constructive Theology a Process Perspective by Bernard Meland Orthodox Dogmatic Theology: A Concise Exposition by Michael Pomazanzky, trans: Seraphim Rose 04.02.008 Liberation Theology (3 Credits) This course explores the framework of Liberation Theology from within Latino and African American perspectives. Texts: A Theology of Liberation by Gustav Gutiérrez Risks of Faith: The Emergence of a Black Theology of Liberation by James Cone God of the Oppressed by James Cone 04.02.009 Postcolonial Theology (3 Credits) This course explores the framework of postcolonial theology. Texts: The Touch of Transcendence: A Postcolonial Theology of God by Mayra Rivera Postcolonial Theologies: Divinity & Empire by Catherine Keller, Michael Nausner, Mayra Rivera 04.02.010 Queer Theology (3 Credits) This course looks at a relatively new theological framework critically encountering issues of sexual orientation and otherness. Texts: Queer Theology: Rethinking the Western Body by Gerard Loughlin et al. Indecent Theology by Marcella Althaus-Reid 04.02.011 -04.02.012 Moral Theology I & II (6 Credits) This course examines the framework of Moral Theology. Course I Introducing Moral Theology: True Happiness & the Virtues by William Mattison Course II The God Who Commands by Richard Mouw Moral Theology: New Directions and Fundamental Issues by John Keating 04.02.013 Historical Theology (3 Credits) This course examines the lens of historical framing in theology. Text: Historical Theology: An Introduction by Geoffrey Bromiley 04.02.014 Radical Theology & Liberal Theologies (3 Credits) This course examines three interrelated minor theological lens that have emerged within the postmodern era to address the growing rise of secularism, fundamentalism, and pluralism. Texts: Radical Theology by Don Cupitt Liberal Theology by Peter Hodgson 04.02.015 -04.02.016 Open Theology I & II (6 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

111

This course examines a theological framework that emerged within American Evangelicalism to answer internal contradictions of the nature of God and to highlight God’s similarity to human beings. Course I God of the Possible by Gregory Boyd The God Who Risks by John Sanders Course II Most Moved Mover by Clark Pinnock The Openness of God by Richard Rice et al. God’s Lesser Glory by Bruce Ware 04.02.017 Readings in Theology (3 Credits) This course will vary semester to semester and will examine critical thinkers, texts, or theories that amplify an areas of religious philosophy and theology. 04.02.018 Independent Study in Theology (3-9 Credits) Students working toward their masters in Religious Philosophy or Theology may elect to develop a specific course of study that culminates in a final paper or project. By permission. 04.02.019 Theology Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students working toward their master are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided. 04.02.020 Theology Doctoral Dissertation (20 Credits) Students working toward their dissertation are required to complete a dissertation. Handbook provided. 04.03 Religious Philosophy 04.03.001 Introduction to Philosophy (3 Credits) This course provides a critical introduction to the broader field of philosophy and critical texts to prepare students for greater study within the field of religious philosophy and theology. Text: An Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings by Perry and Bratman (any edition) 04.03.002-04.03.003 Religious Philosophy I & II (6 Credits) This course introduces the student to the broad field of religious philosophy Texts: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion by Brian Davies Philosophy of Religion by Brian Davies 04.03.004-04.03.005 Epistemology & Religious Experience (6 Credits) This course examines religious experience through the philosophical branch of epistemology framework; in other words how do we know what we know. Course I Problems of Knowledge: A Critical Introduction to Epistemology by Michael Williams Course II Perceiving God: The Epistemology of Religious Experience by Willam Alston

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

112

04.03.006 Metaphysical Philosophy through Aristotle’s Metaphysics (3 Credits) This course examines Aristotle’s seminal text Metaphysics, which would shape unfolding theological discourses and the broader field of religious philosophy. Text available online. Additional readings provided 04.03.007-04.03.008 Medieval Religious Philosophers (6 Credits) This course provides an introduction to critical medieval religious philosophers within diverse traditions, including Thomas Aquinas, Maimodes, Ibn-Sina, St. Augustine and others. Texts: Philosophy of the Middle Ages by Arthur Hyman & James Walsh Knowing the Unknowable God by David Burrell Additional readings supplied 04.03.009-04.03.010 Early Enlightenment & Religion (6 Credits) This course explores seminal philosophers’ explorations of religion through the age of reason with a specific focus on Hume, Descartes, and Pascal. Course I Discourse on Method by Rene Descartes Meditations on the First Philosophy by Rene Descartes Pensées by Blaise Pascal Course II Dialogue Concerning Natural Religion by David Hume Miracles by David Hume Any translation is fine; additional reading supplied 04.03.011-04.03.012 Middle and Late Enlightenment Period & Religion (6 Credits) This course examines philosophical themes and their relationship to religion in the middle to late enlightenment period. Course I The Reasonableness of Christianity as Delivered in the Scriptures by John Locke Christianity Not Mysterious by John Toland Course II Théodicée by Gottfriend Liebniz Critique of Practical Reason by Immanuel Kant The Christian Religion: Lectures on Philosophy of Religion Part 3 by George Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel Any translation affordable/avl; additional readings supplied. 04.03.013-04.03.014 Early Modern Philosophical Period & Religion (6 Credits) This course examines philosophical perspectives on religion within the modern period. Course I Christ and Culture by Richard Neibuhr The Protestant Ethic & the Spirit of Capitalism by Max Weber The Essence of Christianity by Ludwig Feuerbach Fear and Trembling by Søren Kierkegaard Course II The Anti-Christ by Friedrich Nietzche Thus Spoke Zarathustra by Friedrich Nietzche A Common Faith by John Dewey

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

113

04.03.015-04.03.017 Late Modern & Postmodern Period & Religion (9 Credits) This course examines key philosophical works within the late modern and early postmodern period and the merging with theology: including the rise of secular humanism, skepticism, and a return to conservatism. Course I: Secular Humanism & Response Why I Am Not a Christian, and Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects by Bertrand Russell. In Defense of Secular Humanism by Paul Kurtz Dynamics of Faith by Paul Tillich Course II: Modern Conservatism & Apologetics God and Other Minds by Alvin Plantinga The Coherence of Theism by Richard Swinburne The Existence of God by Richard Swinburne Faith and Reason by Richard Swinburne Course III: Postmodernism & Response The Cambridge Companion to Postmodern Theology by Kevin Vanhoozer The Experience of God: A Postmodern Response by Kevin Hart and Barbara Wall Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism? Taking Derrida, Lyotard, and Foucault to Church by James KA Smith Live to Tell: Evangelism in the Postmodern Age by Brad Kallenberg 04.03.018 Readings in Philosophy (3 Credits) This course will vary semester to semester and will examine critical thinkers, texts, or theories that amplify an areas of religious philosophy and theology. 04.03.019 Independent Study in Philosophy (3-9 Credits) Students working toward their masters in Religious Philosophy or Theology may elect to develop a specific course of study that culminates in a final paper or project. By permission. 04.03.020 Religious Theology Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students working toward their master are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided. 04.03.021 Religious Philosophy Doctoral Dissertation (20 Credits) Students working toward their dissertation are required to complete a dissertation. Handbook provided.

04.04 Mysticism & Contemplative Studies 04.04.001-04.04.002 Introduction to Mysticism (6 Credits) This course introduces the students to the history of mysticism and provides a cross cultural examination of mystical writing. Course I Mystics by William Harmless Course II Mysticism: Holiness East and West by Denise Lardner Carmody & John Tully Carmody The Essential Mystics by Andrew Harvey

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

114

04.04.003-04.04.004 Mystical Theology: The Union of Spirituality & Dogma (6 Credits) While this course looks primarily at Judaism and Christianity as frameworks for applying a mystical theological perspective, we will expand our discussion to consider the elements of mystical theology toward other paths. Course I Mystical Theology by Mark McIntosh The Darkness of God: Negativity in Christian Mysticism by Denys Turner A Handbook of a Mystical Theology by Scarameli, trans Nicholson Course II Seek My Face: A Jewish Mystical Theology by Arthur Green These Are Words: A Vocabulary of Jewish Spiritual Life by Arthur Green Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism by Gershom Scholem (also required for Kabbalah courses) [Optional: Jewish Mysticism and the Spiritual Life: Classical Texts, Contemporary Reflections by Fine, Fishbane, Rose) 04.04.005 Mystical Experience & the Brain This course examines the relationship between our biological beings and our mystical states of experience. Texts: Rational Mysticism by John Horgan Mystical Mind by Eugene D’Aquili 04.04.006 Mysticism from an Evangelical Perspective (3 Credits) Rarely viewed as linked to the line of Christian Mysticism, American Evangelical traditions have begun to explore the possibilities of merging a stricter interpretation of the Christian faith, its apostolic creed, and an experience of indwelling; largely shaped by the increasingly popular writer and thinker Elaine Heath. Texts: Longing for Spring: A New Vision for Wesleyen Community by Elaine Heath The Mystic Way of Evangelism: A Contemplative Vision for Christian Outreach by Elaine Heath Naked Faith the Mystical Theology of Phoebe Palmer by Elaine Heath 04.04.007 Women & Mysticism (3 Credits) Women have long played a critical role in the emergence of mystical writing globally; this course takes a special focus on both contemporary and historical women mystics and the value of mysticism for women today. Texts: Radical Wisdom by Beverly J. Lanzetta Women Mystics by Carol Flinders Mystics, Visionaries, and Prophets: A Historical Anthology of Women’s Spiritual Writings by Shawn Madigan 04.04.008 Buddhist Mysticism (3 Credits) Long associated with a mystical core, this course examines stories of mysticism within Buddhism moving beyond the story of Buddha himself. Texts: Foundations of Tibetan Mysticism by Anagarika Govinda Buddhist Masters of Enchantment: The Lives & Legends of the Mahasiddhas by Robert Beer The Lotus-Born: The Life Story of Padmasambhava by Yeshe Tsogyal, et. al.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

115

04.04.009 Islamic Mysticism (3 Credits) An inner aspect of Islam is the emergence of Sufism and mystical comtemplation; this course provides students with a rich examination of this indwelling aspect of Islam. Texts: The Mysticism of Music and Sound by Hazrat Inayat Khan Early Islamic Mysticism: Sufi, Qur’an, Mi’raj, Poetic & Theological Writings by Michael Anthony Sells Grand Masters of Sufism by Shaykh Taner Ansari, et al. 04.04.010-04.04.012 Jewish Mysticism (9 Credits) This course examines the rich heritage of Jewish mysticism. Text: Jewish Mysticism Vol 1-3 by Joseph Dan (each course is a different volume) 04.04.013 Chinese & Taoist Mysticism (3 Credits) This course explores mysticism in pre-Taoist China as well as the emergence of mysticism within Taoism. Texts: Early Chinese Mysticism by Livia Kohn Alchemists, Mediums, and Magicians: Stories of Taoist Mystics by Thomas Cleary 04.04.014 Hindu Mysticism (3 Credits) This course explores the location of mysticism and its stories within Hinduism. Texts: Teachings of Hindu Mystics by Andrew Harvey Hindu Mysticism by SN Dasqupta 04.04.015-04.04.016 The Social Impact of Mysticism (6 Credits) Mysticism has long been associated as a religious impulse fostering social justice and change. This course examines this history. Course I Mysticism & Social Transformation by Janet Ruffing The Silent Cry: Mysticism & Resistance by Dorothea Soelle et al. Course II Power, Gender, & Christian Mysticism by Grace Jantzen 04.04.017 Mysticism & Community (3 Credits) This course explores how mysticism is a path for community building and enriching community participation. Text: The Participatory Turn: Spirituality, Mysticism, & Religious Studies by Ferrer & Sherman 04.04.018 Writings of Mystics (3 Credits) This course varies from semester-to-semester and features a key work by mystics worldwide. 04.04.019-04.04.020 Thomas Merton: The Model for the Contemplative Life (6 Credits) Thomas Merton is viewed by most as the critical writer and thinker of living a contemplative life; blending both mysticism and self-examination in his work. This course examines his critical works on contemplation, prayer and a fulfilling life. Texts: New Seeds of Contemplation by Thomas Merton (intro: Sue Monk Kidd)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

116

Contemplative Prayer by Thomas Merton (intro: Thich Nhat Hanh) New Man Is an Island by Thomas Merton 04.04.022-04.04.025 A Contemplative Life (12 Credits) Most work on living a contemplative life has its origins within Christian monastic writing. In this course we examine the structure of a contemplative life through these lens and begin to extrapolate this outward toward an interreligious framework. Course I: Christian Historical The Contemplative Life by Thomas Phillippe, et al. Essential Monastic Wisdom: Writings on the Contemplative Life by Hugh Feiss Course II: Christian Contemporary The Contemplative Life by John Goldsmith Into the Silent Land: A Guide to Christian Practice of Contemplation by Martin Laid Course III: Global Modern Spiritual Masters: Writings on Contemplation & Compassion by Robert Ellsberg Naked Now: Learning to See as the Mystics See by Richard Rohr Everything Belongs: The Gift of Contemplative Prayer by Richard Rohr Course IV: Spiritual Beauty by John O’Donahue To Bless the Space Between Us by John O’Donahue Anam Cara by John O’Donahue 04.04.026 The Quaker Life of Simplicity (3 Credits) Most individuals know little about this Christian tradition that embodies simplicity, peace, and grace. In this course we examine some of the key and popular modern books on this tradition as sources of model for a contemplative life. Texts: Mind the Light: Learning to See with Spiritual Eyes by J. Brent Bill Plain Living: A Quaker Path to Simplicity by Catherine Whitmire Practicing Peace: A Devotional Walk through the Quaker Tradition by Catherine Whitmire 04.04.027-04.04.028 Prayer: the Heart of Contemplation (6 Credits) Prayer is the cornerstone for contemplation In this two-part course we begin with looking at the how-to of prayer and then begin an in-depth exploration of interreligious prayers. Course I The Energy of Prayer: How to Deepen Your Spiritual Practice by Thich Nhat Hanh Prayer: How to Pray Effectively from the Science of Mind by Ernest Holmes Course II An Inquiring Life: Weekly Contemplations by Laura Duggan Peace Prayers from the World’s Faiths by Robert Grainger Prayers for Hope and Comfort by Maggie Oman Shannon Life Prayers from Around the World by Elizabeth Roberts Prayers for a Thousand Years by Elizabeth Roberts 04.04.029-04.04.030 The Contemporary Monastic Life (6 Credits) This course examines living a monastic life within non-isolated settings. The course is divided into two sections: Christian and Buddhist perspectives. We extrapolate from these to carve out a monastic definition within Ocean Seminary College’s Grotto of Sacred Naturalism.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

117

Course I Finding Sanctuary: Monastic Steps for Everyday Life by Christopher Jamison How to be Monastic and Not Leave Your Day Job by Benet Tvedtan Grace in the Desert: Awakening to the Gifts of Monastic Life by Dennis Patrick Slattery Course II Freedom Wherever You Go: A Buddhist Monastic Code Thich Nhat Hanh Stepping in to Freedom: An Introduction to Buddhist Monastic Training by Thich Nhat Hanh Joyfully Together: The Art of Building a Harmonious Community by Thich Nhat Hanh 04.04.031 Readings in Monasticism and Contemplation (3 Credits) This course will vary semester to semester and will examine critical writers, frameworks, and historical and contemporary examples of monasticism and contemplation. 04.04.032 Independent Study in Contemplative Studies (3-9 Credits) Students working toward their masters in Contemplative Studies may elect to develop a specific course of study that culminates in a final paper or project. By permission. 04.04.035 Contemplative Studies Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students working toward their master are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided.

05 Department of Ecology & Environmental Religious Studies 05.01 Environmental Science 05.01.001 Ecology & the Sacred (3 Credits) This course is required for all degrees at Ocean Seminary. It introduces the students to foundational principles in the science of ecology and explores the role of Nature to one’s spiritual identity. Text provided. 05.01.002-05.01.003 The Way of the Earth: Microcosm (6 Credits) This course will explore the science and wonder of the Earth at the smallest level of life, ranging from a look at bacteria and quantum physics. Course I Microcosmos by Lynn Margulis Course II The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene 05.01.004-05.01.005 The Way of the Earth: Middle Earth (6 Credits) This course will explore physical sciences of biology and its subfield of evolution. Course I Biology Made Simple by Rita King Course II An Introduction to Biological Evolution by Kenneth Kardang Evolution by Mark Ridley Environmental Evolution by Lynn Margulis

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

118

05.01.006-05.01.007 The Way of the Earth: Macrocosm (6 Credits) This course will explore the science and wonder of the Earth situated within the Cosmos, including an introduction to astrophysics, geology, and larger shaping processes. Course I Reading the Rocks by Marcia Bjornerud Course II Before the Big Bang by Brian Clegg Cosmology: A Very Short Introduction by Peter Coles 05.01.008 Advanced Topics in Ecology (3 Credits) This course provides a more in-depth examination of the science of ecology to increase a student’s understanding of the natural processes of the Earth. The course will further extend these discussions to spiritual and religious applications. This course will vary from semester to semester. 05.01.009 Understanding Global Climate Change & Ecosystem Destruction (3 Credits) This course provides students with current science behind global climate change and ecosystem destruction; additionally this course will look at the issue from a multifaceted ethical standpoint. Text: The Science & Politics of Global Climate Change by Andrew Dessler & Edward Parsons 05.01.010 Independent Research in Earth Studies (3-9 Credits) Students may elect to create their own individual research program under the supervision and with the permission of instructor. 05.02 Ecotheology Note: Courses from other religious traditions that focus on their specific ecological/environmental theologies are utilized to ensure a comprehensive interreligious ecotheological lens in your degree. Students working toward ordination should take homiletics and liturgy courses within above courses based on their dominant religious framework (Jewish, Christian, Buddhist, Interreligious etc.) 05.02.001-05.02.002 Introduction to Ecotheology (6 Credits) This course introduces students to the foundational principles of ecotheology as a re-envisioning of Christian thought within an ecological age. Texts: Eco-Theology by Celia Deane-Drummond [Recommended: Ecotheology: Voices from the South & North by David Hallman] 05.02.003 Creaturely Theology This course introduces a theological subset of ecotheology coined by Deane-Drummond as “Creaturely Theology”. Text: Creaturely Theology by Celia Deane-Drummond 05.02.004-05.02.007 Animal Theology (12 Credits) This course examines the relatively new direction of theology that explores the subjectivity and ethical equality of other-than-human species within a cosmological framework. Course I: Theology Animal Theology by Andrew Linzey Creatures of the Same God by Andrew Linzey The Bible According to Noah: Theology as if Animals Mattered by Gary Kowalski

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

119

Course II: Western Ethics Why Animal Suffering Matters by Andrew Linzey God, Humans, & Animals: An Invitation to Enlarge Our Moral Universe by Robert Wennberg Course III: Theodicy—Suffering Nature Red in Tooth and Claw: Theism and the Problem of Animal Suffering by Michael Murray Course IV: Eastern Theology & Ethics Nonviolence to Animals, Earth, and Self in Asian Traditions by Christopher Chapple The Great Compassion: Buddhism & Animal Rights by Norm Phelps 05.02.008 Logical Coherency, Theodicy & Ecotheology (3 Credits) This course looks at the challenge of creating a coherent framework for ecotheology that addresses issues of suffering inherent within life as a biological organism. Text: Environmental Ethics, Ecological Theology, and Natural Selection by Lisa H Sideris 05.02.009 Ecotheology of St. Francis of Assisi (3 Credits) This course explores at length the work of St. Frances of Assisi as a model of applied ecotheology. Text provided. 05.02.010 Ecotheology of Thomas Berry (3 Credits) This course explores the seminal text, The Dream of the Earth, and Thomas Berry’s defining impact within ecotheological and ecospiritual frameworks. Texts: The Dream of the Earth Thomas Berry A Theology for the Earth by Anne Marie Dalton 05.02.011 Ecotheology of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (3 Credits) This course explores a foundational thinker within the emergence of ecothology and antecedent ecospiritual frameworks. Texts: The Phenomenon of Man by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin Hymn to the Universe by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin 05.02.012 Profiles of Ecotheologians (3 Credits) The individuals featured in this course will vary from semester to semester and focuses on specific ecotheologians and their writing. This course will also include re-reading religious material through an ecotheological framework to help provide practice for students developing their own ecotheological framework. 05.02.013 Readings in Ecotheology (3 Credits) This course will vary from semester to semester and examine the broader field of ecotheology, both within and outside Christian frameworks. 05.02.014 Independent Study in Ecotheology (3-9 Credits) Students may explore a research project of their own inclination that culminates in a final paper. By permission. 05.02.015 Ecotheology Ministerial Practicum (10 Credits) Students seeking ordination are required to participate in a supervised internship.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

120

05.02.016 Ecotheology Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students working toward their master are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided. 05.02.017 Ecotheology Doctoral Dissertation (20 Credits) Students working toward their dissertation are required to complete a dissertation. Handbook provided. 05.03 Religious Naturalism 05.03.001-05.03.004 Religious Naturalism Definitions and Counterpoints (12 Credits) This course will introduce students to the fundamental philosophical and religious principles of Sacred/Religious Naturalism. Course I: Philsophical Explorations—Religion & Science Religion and Scientific Naturalism: Overcoming Conflicts by David Ray Griffin Between Naturalism & Religion by Jurgen Habermas Course II & III: A Religious Naturalism—Synthesizing Religion & Science Course II Encountering Naturalism: A Worldview and Its Uses by Thomas Clark A Religion of Nature by Donald Crosby Course III New Essays in Religious Naturalism by W Creighton Peden & Larry E Axel Course IV: Counterpoint—Theism Is Necessary Naturalism by Stewart Goetz & Charles Taliaferro Additional Readings supplied 05.03.005-05.03.007 Toward an Atheology of Religious Naturalism (9 Credits) This course examines core atheological perspectives linked to religious naturalism and how these may be applied within a ministerial or personal context. Course I: The Absenting of God When God Is Gone, Everything Is Holy by Chet Ramyo The Sacred Depths of Nature by Ursula Goodenough Course II: Community & Kinship The Reenchanted World: The Quest for Kinship with Nature by James W. Gibson Holdfast by Kathleen Dean Moore Course III: Atheodicy—Questions of Suffering Living with Ambiguity: Religious Naturalism and the Menace of Evil by Donald Crosby Additional readings supplied 05.03.008-05.03.009 Place (6 Credits) At the heart of contemporary writing within religious naturalism is the concept of self-in-connection-toplace. In religious naturalism, place is the source for spiritual insight as well as the source of an immediate sense of spiritual connectivity. Course I The Sacred Place by W. Scott Olsen & Scott Cairns Course II At Home on the Earth: Becoming Native to Our Place by David Barnhil

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

121

05.03.010 Works of Religious Naturalists (3 Credits) This course explores a diverse range of writers who are considered religious naturalists and what we may gain from their work in informing a spiritual orientation. 05.03.011-05.03.016 Religious Naturalist Ministry (18 Credits) This is a complex series of courses for students preparing for ordination within Religious Naturalism. All reading is provided. Students must have completed all prior courses in religious naturalism before enrolling. Course I: Cultivating Naturalist Liturgy I & II Course 2: Homiletics for the Religious Naturalist I & II Course 3: Creating Community, Responding to Crisis Course 4: Ethics for the Religious Naturalist Minister 05.03.017 Special Topics in Religious Naturalism (3 Credits) This course varies from semester to semester to highlight and amplify issues in religious naturalism. 05.03.018 Independent Study in Religious Naturalism (3-9 Credits) Students may opt to select a topic of their choice to explore in greater depth culminating in a final research paper. By Permission only. 05.03.019 Religious Naturalism Ministerial Practicum (10 Credits) Students seeking ordination are required to participate in a supervised internship following the completion of all coursework. 05.03.020 Religious Naturalism Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students seeking a master’s degree are required to complete a thesis. Handbook provided. 05.03.021 Religious Naturalism Doctoral Dissertation (20 Credits) Students seeking a doctoral degree are required to complete a dissertation. Handbook provided. 05.04 Ecosophy & Environmental Ethics Note: Students are strongly encouraged to take Introduction to Philosophy within the Religious Philosophy program to ensure a firm general foundation to the field of philosophy and its concerns. 05.04.001 Introduction to Environmental Philosophy This course provides students with a general foundation in environmental philosophy. Texts: Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology by Zimmerman et al. [Recommended: What Is Nature by Kate Soper] 05.04.002-05.04.004 Ecofeminism (9 Credits) This course explores the principles of ecofeminism through critical thinkers and perspectives. Course I Reweaving the World by Diamond & Orenstein Ecofeminist Philosophy by Karen Warren Course II Feminism and the Mastery of Nature by Val Plumwood

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

122

Environmental Culture by Val Plumwood Course III Woman & Nature by Susan Grifin Ecofeminist Ethics by Marti Kheel 05.04.005-04.04.007 Deep Ecology & Ecosophy (9 Credits) This course explores the philosophical principles of Deep Ecology, with specific attention to Arne Naess. Course I: Roots Ecology, Community & Lifestyle by Arne Naess Life’s Possibilities by Arne Naes Course II: Movement The Deep Ecology Movement by Alan Drengson & Yuichi Inoue Deep Ecology by Devall and Sessions Course III: Advanced Applications Ecological Identity by Mitchell Thomashow Toward a Transpersonal Ecology by Warwick Fox 05.04.009 Radical Ecology (3 Credits) This course examines a specific movement in environmental philosophy largely speared by Carolyn Merchant. Texts: Radical Ecology by Carolyn Merchant The End of Nature by Bill McKibben Additional readings provided. 05.04.009-05.04.011 Environmental Ethics (9 Credits) This course explores the emergent field of environmental ethics from key thinkers. Course I: Land Ethics—Beginnings A Sand County Almanac by Aldo Leopold The writings of John Muir (avl online) Course II The Rights of Nature by Roderick Nash Course III A Theory of General Ethics by Warwick Fox 05.04.012 Nature in the Media (3 Credits) Course utilizes a variety of television programs and other media sources to critically explore human– nature relationship, as well as promote greater knowledge of nature. Texts: Shooting in the Wild by Chris Palmer Picturing the Beast by Steve Baker 05.04.013-05.04.014 Toward an Environmental Theory of Literature (6 Credits) This course introduces the student to ecocriticism, a way of reading texts from an environmental lens. Course I Ecocriticism by Greg Garrard Course II The Comedy of Survival: Literary Ecology and a Play Ethic by Joseph Meeker

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

123

Sustainable Poetry by Leornard M. Scigaj 05.04.015 The Joyful Naturalist (3 Credits) This course looks at specific nature-writers or nature anthologies through a multi-lens framework of ecocriticism, environmental philosophy, and ecospiritality. Texts vary from semester to semester. Students are encouraged to have taking Introduction to Environmental Philosophy and the first course of Toward an Environmental Theory of Literature. 05.04.016 Independent Research in Environmental Philosophy (3-9 Credits) Students may elect to create their own individual research program under the supervision and with the permission of instructor. 05.04.017 Special Topics in Environmental Philosophy (3 Credits) The subjects and material will vary from semester to semester to amplify a critical area in environmental philosophical thought. 05.04.018 Environmental Philosophy Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students within the master’s program are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided. 06 Department of Pastoral Counseling & Ecopsychology It is important to note that achieving a degree in ecopsychology or a certification in pastoral counseling does not enable students to advertise themselves as “counselors”, “psychologists”, or “psychotherapists”. These latter titles require appropriate state licensing. Students are reminded to check with their state for any restrictions on religious counseling practice. 06.01 Ecopsychology Note: Students within ecopsychology are required to take Introduction to Environmental Philosophy and all courses within the Deep Ecology series as these are critical foundations to Ecopsychology 06.01.001-06.01.006 Ecopsychology Frameworks & Paradigms (18 Credits) This course series will introduce the student to the burgeoning interdisciplinary field of Ecopsychology, which explores the ecological location of the human being within Nature, and its main principles, problems, and practice. Ideally these courses are taken in order as this will provide a historical timeline for the development of the field and the various frameworks that define it. Course I: A Beginning Questions Nature & Madness by Paul Shephard We’ve Had a Hundred Years of Psychotherapy and the World’s Getting Worse by James Hillman Course II: Popular Ecopsychology A Voice of the Earth by Theodore Roszak Radical Ecopsychology by Andy Fisher Course III: Ecological Psychology The Psychology of Environmental Problems by Deborah Winter Course IV: Green Psychology & Terrapsychology Green Psychology by Ralph Metzner Terrapsychology by Craig Chalquist Rebearths: Conversations with a World Ensouled by Craig Chalquist Course V: Depth Psychology

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

124

Depth Psychology: Meditations in the Field by Slattery & Corbett Course VI: Mainstream Psychology Conservation Psychology by Gene Meyers & Susan Clayton Additional readings supplied 06.01.007 Readings in Ecopsychology (3 Credits) This course will deepen one’s understanding of Ecopsychology through selected readings in the field. Text: Ecopsychology by Roszak, Gomes, and Kanner 06.01.008 Ecotherapy (3 Credits) This course explores the principles and practice of Ecotherapy, a nature-based counseling intervention. Texts: Ecotherapy by Clinebell Ecotherapy by Buzell & Chalquist Despair and Personal Power in the Nuclear Age by Joanna Macy The Love of Nature and the End of the World by Shierry Nicholson 06.01.009-06.01.012 Nature, Experience, Kinship and Identity (12 Credits) This course explores how our identity and our beingness is impacted by the Natural environment. Course I Nature & Identity by Susan Opotow and Susan Clayton Self, Interaction, and the Natural Environment by Andrew Weigart Course II Nature & the Psyche by David Kidner The Experience of Nature by Kaplan and Kaplan Course III The Human Relationship with Nature by Peter Kahn Green Nature/Human Nature by Lewis Course IV The Biophilia Hypothesis by Stephen Kellert and Edward O. Wilson Kinship to Mastery by Stephen Kellert 06.01.013 Nature Deficit Disorder: Restoring Children’s Connection to Nature (3 Credits) This course explores the innate relationship of children to Nature and strategies to restore this connection. Texts: Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv The Nature Principle: Reconnecting with Life in a Virtual Age by Richard Louv 06.01.014 Experience Nature as Wilderness (3 Credits) This course examines the impact of wilderness therapy and wilderness experience upon our perceptions of what is non-human and upon human health. Text: The Long Shore by Jane Wheelwright & Lynda Schmidt. 06.01.015 Special Topics in Ecopsychology (3 Credits) The material in this course varies semester-to-semester and serves to highlight current writers or issues emerging within the field of ecopsychology. 06.01.016 Independent Research in Ecopsychology (3-9 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

125

Students may elect to create their own individual research program under the supervision and with the permission of instructor. 06.01.017 Ecopsychology Master’s Thesis (10 Credits) Students within the master’s program are required to complete a master’s thesis. Handbook provided. 06.01.018 Ecopsychology Doctorate (20 Credits) Students within doctoral program are required to complete a doctoral thesis. Handbook provided. 06.01.019 Ecopsychology Practicum (10 credits) Students seeking ordination are required to participate in a supervised internship following the completion of all coursework. 06.02 Pastoral Counseling Note: Open only to students within a ministerial or combined tract. As counseling textbooks are routinely discontinued and new editions emerge based on more current research, no text books are announced in the catalog. 06.02.001 Foundations in Counseling (3 Credits) Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of counseling, including establishing the therapeutic alliance, the parameters of helping, and fundamental techniques of counseling. Required text: Effective Helping: Interviewing and Counseling Techniques (6th Edition, 2001) by Barbara F. Okun 06.02.002 Counseling Theories (3 Credits) Students will gain a theoretical understanding of various theories of counseling and interventions with specific emphasis on counseling the culturally diverse. Required text: Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy: A Multicultural Perspective (5th Edition, 2001) by Allen Ivey, Michael D’Andrea, Mary Bradford Ivey, and Lynn Simek-Morgan. 06.02.003 The Self-Reflective Counselor (3 Credits) Students will gain important self-reflective skills to ensure they are able to process their own personal issues and biases when counseling. Required texts: The Therapist’s Workbook: Self-Assessment, Self-Care, and Self-Improvement Exercises for Mental Health Professionals by Jeffrey A. Kottler Self Supervision: A Primer for Counselors and Human Service Professionals by Patrick J. Morrissette On Being a Therapist by Jeffrey A Kottler 06.02.004 Assessment (3 Credits) Students will learn how to create a cohesive assessment and interventional plan for any member of their faith they are counseling. Students will specifically develop interview and observational skills to obtain the most complete picture of their member. Text provided. Abnormal Psychology and Life: A Dimensional Approach by Christopher A Kearney and Timothy J. Trull (Recommended Text) 06.02.005 Psychology of Religion (3 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

126

Students will obtain a broad understanding of the psychological foundation of religious and spiritual development including specific discussions on religious identity development, spiritual crises, and spiritual mentoring. Texts: The Psychology of Spirituality: An Introduction by Larry Culliford Spiritual Strategy for Counseling and Psychotherapy by P. Scott Richards and Allen E. Bergin [Recommended: The Psychology of Religion (4th Edition), by Ralph Hood, Peter Hill, and Bernard Spilka] 06.02.006–06.02.007 Techniques of Pastoral Counseling & Spiritual Mentoring I & II (3 Credits) Students will expand upon their fundamental counseling skills and specifically explore the pastoral and spiritual mentoring relationship with members of their specific faith. Students will learn how to apply theological/thealogical interventions toward the amelioration of challenges, while at the same time learn diverse strategies to help members deepen their spiritual beliefs. (Prerequisite: 06.02.001 Foundations in Counseling) Course 1 Revisioning Transpersonal Theory: A Participatory Vision of Human Spirituality by Jorge Ferrer Stages of Faith: The Psychology of Human Development and the Quest for Meaning by James W. Fowler The Unfolding Self: Varieties of Transformative Experience by Ralph Metzner Course 2 Pastoral Counseling Across Cultures by David W. Augsburger The Pastoral Counseling Treatment Planner by James R. Kok and Arthur E Jongsman Simply Sane: The Spirituality of Mental Health by Gerald May How to Know God by Deepak Chopra 06.02.008 Crisis Assessment & Counseling (3 Credits) Students will learn the fundamental skills for effective crisis counseling both from a lay and religious perspective; while at the same time gaining skills in knowing when to refer members to other professionals. Texts: People in Crisis (5th Edition): Clinical and Public Health Perspectives by Lee Ann Hoff The Dark Night of the Soul: A Psychiatrist Explores the Connection between Darkness and Spiritual Growth by Gerald G. May 06.02.009 Pastoral Counseling Across the Lifespan (3 Credits) Students will gain foundational knowledge of human development to better contextualize the challenges facing members of their faith and develop age-appropriate interventions. Texts: Children and Spirituality: Searching for Meaning and Connectedness by Brendan Hyde Pastoral Care of Older Adults by Harold Koenig There’s a Spiritual Solution to Every Problem by Wayne W. Dyer 06.02.010 Group Process (3 Credits) This course emphasizes and empowers the pastoral counselor to establish and facilitate pastoral-based groups to address a wide range of challenges facing members. Students will learn about anticipating group challenges and working with group dynamics to ensure safe and effective group-wide interventions. Texts: Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy (5th Edition) by Irvin D. Yalom

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

127

The Group Therapy Experience: From Theory to Practice by Louis R. Ormon 06.02.011 Boundaries, Ethics, and Professional Practice (3 Credits) This course will ensure that students learn to develop and maintain personal and professional boundaries as well as ground their pastoral work in a best-practice framework. Text: Taking Care: Monitoring Power Dynamics and Relational Boundaries in Pastoral Care and Counseling by Carrie Doehring 06.02.012 Special Topics in Pastoral Counseling: Loss & Bereavement This course will explore pastoral interventions to address experiences of loss and bereavement among membership. Specific focus on both human and nonhuman animal companion losses will be examined, as well as identifying protracted, complicated bereavement that may require referral to a mental health professional. Prerequisite course: 03.01.009 The Afterlife: Religious Perspectives on Death & Dying. Texts: On Grief and Grieving: Finding the Meaning of Grief through the Five Stages of Loss by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross and David A Kessler Grieving Mindfully: A Compassionate and Spiritual Guide to Coping with Loss by Sameet M. Kumar Recovering from Losses in Life by H. Norman Wright Stories from the Edge: A Theology of Grief by Greg Garrett 06.02.013 Special Topics in Pastoral Counseling: Disease & Chronic Illness This course explores pastoral-based interventions to help caregivers and members coping with a chronic illness or facing a disease process. Specific topics in this course will also include an examination of the psychoneuroimmunological pathway of disease to help pastoral counselors intervene in this cycle to help promote improved health and coping of their member. Texts: Spiritual and Psychological Aspects of Illness: Dealing with Sickness, Loss, Dying, and Death by Beverly A. Musgrave and Neil McGettigan Spirituality and Intellectual Disability: International Perspectives on the Effect of Culture and Religion on Healing Body, Mind, and Soul by William C Gavents and David Coulter Disability and the Gospel: How God Uses Our Brokenness to Display His Grace by Michael S. Beates 06.02.014-06.02.015 Special Topics in Pastoral Counseling: Addictions This course will examine issues associated with the development of and treatment for addiction from a pastoral perspective. Students will gain familiarity with 12-step methods and strategies of adapting these methods within their own religious framework. Course I Understanding Addiction by Elizabeth Connell Henderson Addiction and Spirituality: A Multidisciplinary Approach by Oliver J. Morgan and Merle Jordan Course II Addiction and Grace: Love and Spirituality in the Healing of Addictions by Gerald G. May Recovering Spirituality: Achieving Emotional Sobriety in Your Spiritual Practice by Ingrid Mathieu 06.02.016 Practicum & Internship (10 Credits) Students will be required to complete a supervised counseling internship either online with Ocean Seminary College or through a local religious group in their home area. Students who already hold valid state counselor licenses (LPC, LCSW, Psychology Licenses, LMHC are exempt from this requirement as they have already received this training as a component of their graduate counseling degrees).

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

128

07 Department of Spiritual & Religious Art 07.01 General Spiritual & Religious Art 07.01.001 Introduction to Religion, Spirituality, and Creativity (3 credits) This course introduces students to the linkages between creativity and spiritual and religious expression. Required Textbooks: Creativity and Spirituality: Bonds Between Art and Religion by Earle J. Coleman Creative Spirituality: The Way of the Artist by Robert Wuthnow 07.01.002-07.01.003 Religion, Spirituality, & Literary Expression I & II (each course 3 credits) Part One of this course explores how religious and spiritual themes and ideas are expressed in literature. In Part Two of this course, participants begin the process of applying psychospiritual-based methods towards the writing process.. Course I Religion and Literature: A Reader by Robert Detweiler, David Jasper , Heidi L. Nordberg, and S. Brent Plate Additional readings supplied Course II How the Light Gets In: Writing as a Spiritual Practice by Pat Schneider The Soul Tells a Story: Engaging Creativity with Spirituality in the Writing Life by Vinita Hampton Wright 07.01.004 The Artist’s Way (6 Credits; two-semester course) This course is a two-semester course that moves through the Artist Way text and adjunct materials to help artistic students jump-start their creativity and utilize psychospiritual methods to help support the ongoing development and habit of creativity. Required texts: The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron Walking in this World by Julia Cameron Finding Water by Julia Cameron 07.01.005 Music’s Place in Religion and Spirituality (3 Credits) This course looks at the history of music within world religions and the contemporary spiritual themes in modern music. Required texts: Sacred Sound: Experiencing Music in World Religions by Guy L. Beck Traces of the Spirit: The Religious Dimensions of Popular Music by Robin Sylvan 07.01.006 Spirituality, Religion, and Visual Art (3 Credits) This course introduces students to the role of visual art within religious and spiritual expressions. Required text: The Sacred Gaze: Religious Visual Culture in Theory and Practice by David Morgan Windows into the Soul: Art as Spiritual Expression by Michael Radford Sullivan and Michael Sullivan 07.01.007 Dance and Sacrality (3 Credits) This course explores the role of dance as a spiritual practice and expression. Required texts: Soul and Spirit in Dance Movement Psychotherapy: A Transpersonal Approach by Jill Hayes Dance—the Sacred Art: The Joy of Movement as a Spiritual Practice by Cynthia Winton-Henry Dancing Culture Religion by Sam Gill

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

129

07.01.008 Merging Art Therapy and Spirituality (3 Credits) This course introduces the creative arts student to the role of therapy and spirituality. Required texts: Spirituality and Art Therapy: Living the Connection by Mimi Farrelly-Hansen Spiritual Art Therapy: An Alternate Path by Ellen G. Horovitz and Werner I Halpern 07.01.009: Artist and Audience: The Community and Communion (3 Credits) This course explores the relationship between the artist and his or her community through the lens of the artist as a healer and spiritual guide Text: Art as Medicine by Shuan McNiff Art Heals: How Creativity Cures the Soul by Shaun McNiff Additional readings supplied 07.01.010-07.01.011 Nature and the Artist I & II (3 Credits each) Pre-requisite: Ecology and the Sacred. This course expands upon the ecological contexts explored within the pre-requisite class and elaborates on how the manifest or are absented within diverse modes of artistic expression. Text: Course I Drawing Closer to Nature: Making Art in Dialogue with the Natural World by Peter London (I) Thinking Like a Mountain by Robert Bateman (I) Course II Picturing the Beast by Steve Baker (II) Additional readings supplied. 07.01.0012 Incorporating Nature in Art (3 Credits) Prerequisite: Nature and the Artist I & II. This course allows students to assess their own artistic modes of expression and explore how Nature emerges in their work and explore ways to transform Nature from backdrop to foreground and the visceral implications of this type of shift in perspective. Texts Writing about Nature by John Murray Additional reading supplied. 07.01.013 The Joyful Naturalist (3 Credits) This course will explore the identity of the naturalist as a source of spiritual wisdom through diverse readings in literature, spirituality, and science. Text: The Colors of Nature by Alison Deming and Lauret Savoy A Place on Earth by Mark Tredinnick Earth Songs: A Resurgence Anthology of Eco-poetry by Peter Abbs 07.01.014 Independent Study (3-9 Credits) Students may select a topic of their choice to research and create projects with pending approval of professor. 07.01.015 Master’s Thesis/Project (20 Credits) All students within the MFA program are required to complete a thesis or final artistic project as a culmination of their studies. Handbook provided.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

130

07.02 Shamanism Through Art 07.02.001-07.02.002 Shamanism, Creativity, & the Arts I & II (3 Credits each) This course explores how a shamanistic framework may be applied to diverse forms of artistic expression as a means of developing and expanding upon one’s creative center, as well as a means of promoting social and psychological integration of the audience. Texts: Course I Cave Paintings and the Human Spirit: The Origin of Creativity and Belief by David S. Whitley (I) Faces of Your Soul by Elise Dirlam Ching & Kaleo Ching (I) Course II Image and Spirit by Karen Stone (II) Creativity and Spirituality by Robert Wuthnow (II) Additional readings supplied 07.02.003 The Shamanic Call as a Creative Call (3 Credits) This course looks at the call to becoming an artist as a spiritual and shamanic call. Text: Follow the Shaman’s Call: An Ancient Path for Modern Lives by Mike Williams (Optional: The Creative Call by Janice Elsheimer; NOTE: uses Christian imagery). 07.02.004-07.02.005 Developing the Shamanic Narrative I & II (3 Credits each) In this course students explore diverse modes of artistic expression and critically examine elements of the shamanic story and cosmological structures. Prerequisite: 01.01. 006 The Shaman. Course I The Hidden World by Carl Ruck et al. Course II Deep Cinema by Mary Trainor-Brigham Films (II): Spirited Away Whale Rider The Blue Butterfly Mirrormask Pan’s Labyrinth Alice in Wonderland Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium Avatar 07.02.006: The Artist as Shaman (3 Credits) This course examines how each student manifest shamanic themes in their lives and in their craft. Texts: Technicians of Ectasy: Shamanism and the Modern Artist by Mark Levy and Ruth-Inge Heinze Painting the Dream: The Shamanic Life of David Chethlahe Paladin by Chethlahe Paladin Stone Fires—Liquid Clouds: The Shamanic Art of Derek Hyatt by Derek Hyatt & Peter Woodco*ck 07.02.007 Expression Shamanic Cosmologies (3 Credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

131

This course series introduces the artist in greater depth to examine the mythic, psychological, creative, and spiritual themes of the Axis Mundi, as well as provide experiential opportunities to give creative expression to these themes. Text provided. 07.03 Women’s Spirituality Through Art 07.03.001 Women in the History of Art (3 credits) This course looks at the role of women in art through history. Texts: Danger: Women Artists at Work by Debra Mancoff Old Mistresses: Women, Art, and Ideology by Parker and Pollock [Optional: Women Artists in History: From Antiquity to Present by Wendy Slatkin] 07.03.002 The Artistic Expression of Goddess (3 credits) This course explores the emergence of Goddess-based art. Texts: The Once and Future Goddess by Elinor Gadon Goddess: Mother of Living Nature by Adele Getty [Optional: The Heart of the Goddess: Art, Myth, and Meditations of the World’s Sacred Feminine by Hallie Austen] 07.03.003 Sacrality of Dance (3 credits) This course explores the emergence of sacred dance within Goddess-based paths and traditions. Texts: Sacred Women, Sacred Dance: Awakening Spirituality through Movement and Ritual by Iris Stewart The Dancing Goddesses: Folklore, Archaeology, and the Origins of European Dance by Elizabeth Barber 07.03.004 Women and Literature (3 credits) This course explores the history of women writers and the kinds of social barriers and issues of concern. Text: A Literature of Their Own by Elaine Showalter 07.03.005 Women Engaged in Sacred Writing (3 credits) This course explores the ways in which women’s writing may become an act of the sacred. Texts: Women, Writing, and Soul-Making: Creativity and the Sacred Feminine by Peggy Millin Sisters Singing: Blessings, Prayers, Art, Songs, Poetry and the Sacred Stories by Women by Carolyn Flynn 07.04 Christianity Through Art 07.04.001 An Introduction to Art in Christianity (3 credits) This course introduces the student to the world of art within Christianity. Texts: Christian Art: A Very Short Introduction by Beth Williamson Signs and Symbols in Christian Art by George Ferguson 07.04.002 Christian Art as Sacred Call (3 credits) This course explores the process of creating Christian-centered artwork and the spiritual elements of art as a calling from God. Texts: Art for God’s Sake: A Call to Recover the Arts by Philip Graham Ryken Imagine: A Vision for Christians in the Arts by Steve Turner 07.04.003 Art for Prayer and Contemplation (3 credits)

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

132

This course explores how art may become a pathway for greater spiritual awareness and closeness with God. Text: Contemplative Vision: A Guide to Christian Art and Prayer by Juliet Benner 07.04.004 Creating Christian Art (3 credits) This course explores applying Christian themes and values into one’s artistic vision. Text: Art & Soul: Signposts for Christians in the Arts by Hilary Brand and Adrienne Chaplin Art in Action: Towards a Christian Aesthetic by Nicholas Wolterstorff

08 Department of Contemporary Spiritualties 08.01 Compassionate Lifestyle Coach & Careworker 08.01.001 Twelve Steps Toward a Compassionate Life (9 Credits) This course students spend the year actively working toward manifesting a compassionate life and bringing to bear in their own lives the “Charter for Compassion”. Text: Twelve Steps to a Compassionate Life by Karen Armstrong. 08.01.002-08.01.003 Pathways to Peace I and II (3 Credits each) This is a two-part course that explores the ways in which individuals may become agents of change in conflicted environments and manifest peace at both individual and social levels. Course I The Psychology of Peace: An Introduction by Rachel M. MacNair Peace, Conflict, and Violence: Peace Psychology for the 21st Century by Daniel Christie, Richard Wagner, and Deborah DuNann Winter Approaches to Peace: A Reader in Peace Studies by David Barash Course II Creating True Peace: Ending Violence in Yourself, Your Family, Your Community and the World by Thich Nhat Hanh Working for Peace: A Handbook of Practical Psychology and Other Tools by Rachel MacNair and Arun Gandhi Being Peace by Thich Nhat Hanh 08.01.004-08.01.006 Letting Go, Letting Be, Being Still (3 credits each) This course series explores the importance of developing inner peace and being able to live in the present moment. Course I The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle Stillness Speaks by Eckhart Tolle From Stress to Stillness: Tools for Inner Peace by Gina Lake Course II Buddha’s Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom by Rick Hanson Just One Thing: Developing a Buddha Brain One Simply Practice at a Time by Rick Hanson Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm, and Confidence by Rick Hanson Course III Letting Go: The Pathways to Surrender by David Hawkins True Refuge: Finding Peace and Refuge in Your Own Awakened Heart by Tara Brach

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

133

Simplicity: The Freedom of Letting Go by Richard Rohr 08.01.007 Creating Simplicity This course explores ways to simplify one’s life to reduce stress and distractions. Texts: Freedom of Simplicity: Finding Harmony in a Complex World by Richard Foster 7: An Experimental Mutiny Against Excess by Jen Hatmaker Choosing Simplicity: Real People Finding Peace and Fulfillment in a Complex World by Linda Breen Pierce 08.01.008 Embracing Wabi-Sabi: The Value of Imperfection This course explores the importance of embracing the imperfect in life versus striving to become perfect. Texts: The Gift of Imperfection: Letting Go of Who You Think You Should Be and Embrace Who You Are by Brene Brown Wabi Sabi Love: The Ancient Art of Finding Perfect Love in Imperfect Relationships by Arielle Ford Wabi Sabi: Timeless Wisdom for a Stress-Free Life by Agneta Winqvist Wabi Sabi: The Japanese Art of Impermanence by Andrew Juniper 08.01.009 Compassionate Assessment This course explores incorporating ideas of compassionate care within the therapeutic process. Texts: I’m Here: Compassionate Communication in Patient Care by Marcus Engel and Marvelyn Engel The Compassionate Mind: A New Approach to Life’s Challenges by Paul Gilbert Compassion Focused Therapy: Distinctive Features by Paul Gilbert 08.01.010 Supporting Change This course explores the role of life coach and supporting change in clients’ lives. Texts: Therapist as Life Coach: An Introduction for Counselors and Other Helping Professionals by Patrick Williams and Deborah Davis Total Life Coaching: 50+ Life Lessons, Skills and Techniques to Enhance Your Practice and Your Life by Patrick Williams and Lloyd J Thomas Co-active Coaching: Changing Business, Transforming Lives by Karen Kimsey-House, et al. 08.01.011 Compassionate Internship (20 Credits) Students who have completed all their coursework for the program for the Lifestyle Coach and Careworker degree are eligible to begin their supervised internship to complete their degree. 08.02 A Course in Miracles 08.02.001 A Course in Miracles There are no courses in this department outside the primary study course. Texts: A Course in Miracles (combined edition for teachers and students) A Return to Love by Marianne Williamson; students additionally taking teacher training-focused work with the material. 08.03 Contemporary Spiritualties 08.03.001 Introduction to Contemporary Spiritualties This course provides students with an overview of the modern spirituality movement. Students will examine the difference between spirituality and religion. Texts: provided.

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

134

08.03.002 Reading Wayne Dyer This course looks at the work of Wayne Dyer and his influence in shaping the modern spiritual movement in the West. 08.03.003 Reading Eckharte Tolle This course looks at the work of Eckharte Tolle and his influence in shaping the modern spiritual movement in the West. 08.03.004 Reading Doreen Virtue This course looks at the work of Doreen Virtue and his influence in shaping the modern spiritual movement in the West through her Angel theological perspectives. 08.03.005 Reading Marianne Williams This course looks at the critical works of Marianne Williams and her work within the Course in Miracles theology as well as her impact on general spirituality. 08.03.006 Reading Louise Hay & Hay House This course will look at several texts by Louise Hay, plus examine the influence of Hay House publishing and radio on the development of the modern spirituality movement. 08.03.007 Reading Caroline Myss This course will explore critical texts by Caroline Myss and examine the role of medical intuition upon the modern spirituality movements conception of health and wellness. 08.03.008-009 Reading Deepak Chopra & Christiane Northrup This is a 2-part course that will move through critical texts of Deepak Chopra and Christiane Northrup and their broad influence in defining the modern spirituality movement from its holistic structure of mindbody integration. 08.03.010 Love and Relating This course will look at the modern spirituality movements perspectives on love. Writers that will be explored include Thomas Moore, Marianne Williams, Jamie Turndorf and more. 08.03.011 Blending Paths: Modern Spirituality, Shamanism, and Buddhism This course will examine how shamanism and Buddhism have entered into the landscape of the modern spirituality movement. Work explored include Dan Millman, Pema Chodra, Ram Dass, etc. 08.03.012 Reading Richard Bach This course explores the seminal work of Jonathan Livingston Seagull and its impact in shaping the modern spirituality movement. 08.03.013 Connecting to Spirit This course looks at writers such as Neal Donald Walsch, Doreen Virtue, James Van Praagh, Sonia Choquette and others. 08.03.014 Independent Study

Augustus International University, 2015–2016

Students may elect to study a topic of their own choosing within this major with permission from Dr. Batten. 08.03.015 Masters Thesis Students complete their master’s program at the conclusion of coursework. Handbook supplied.

135

[PDF] Augustus International University. Catalog - Free Download PDF (2024)

References

Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Nathanael Baumbach

Last Updated:

Views: 6102

Rating: 4.4 / 5 (55 voted)

Reviews: 94% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Nathanael Baumbach

Birthday: 1998-12-02

Address: Apt. 829 751 Glover View, West Orlando, IN 22436

Phone: +901025288581

Job: Internal IT Coordinator

Hobby: Gunsmithing, Motor sports, Flying, Skiing, Hooping, Lego building, Ice skating

Introduction: My name is Nathanael Baumbach, I am a fantastic, nice, victorious, brave, healthy, cute, glorious person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.